HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Power In International Relations
Power in international relations is defined in several different ways. Modern discourse generally speaks in terms of state power, indicating both economic and military power. Those states that have significant amounts of power within the international system are referred to as small powers, middle powers, regional powers, great powers, superpowers, or hegemons, although there is no commonly accepted standard for what defines a powerful state. NATO
NATO
Quint,the G7, the BRICS
BRICS
nations and the G20
G20
are seen by academics as forms of governments that exercise varying degrees of influence within the international system. Entities other than states can also be relevant in power acquisition in international relations
[...More...]

Power (other)
Power
Power
typically refers to either: Power
Power
(physics), meaning "energy for work" or
[...More...]

picture info

Cooperative
A cooperative (also known as co-operative, co-op, or coop) is "an autonomous association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social, and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly-owned and democratically-controlled enterprise".[1] Cooperatives may include:non-profit community organizations businesses owned and managed by the people who use their services (a consumer cooperative) organisations managed by the people who work there (worker cooperatives) organisations managed by the people to whom they provide accommodation (housing cooperatives) hybrids such as worker cooperatives that are also consumer cooperatives or credit unions multi-stakeholder cooperatives such as those that bring together civil society and local actors to deliver community needs second- and third-tier cooperatives whose members are other cooperativesResearch published by the
[...More...]

picture info

Realism In International Relations
Realism is a school of thought in international relations theory, theoretically formalising the Realpolitik statesmanship of early modern Europe. Although a highly diverse body of thought, it can be thought of as unified by the belief that world politics ultimately is always and necessarily a field of conflict among actors pursuing power. Crudely, realists are of three kinds in what they take the source of ineliminable conflict to be. Classical realists believe that it follows from human nature, neorealists focus upon the structure of the anarchic state system, and neoclassical realists believe that it is a result of a combination of the two and certain domestic variables. Realists also disagree about what kind of action states ought to take to navigate world politics, dividing between (although most realists fall outside the two groups) defensive realism and offensive realism
[...More...]

picture info

Carl Von Clausewitz
French Revolutionary WarsSiege of MainzNapoleonic WarsBattle of Jena–Auerstedt Battle of Borodino Battle of Ligny Battle of WavreCarl Philipp Gottfried (or Gottlieb) von Clausewitz[1] (/ˈklaʊzəvɪts/; 1 June 1780 – 16 November 1831)[2] was a Prussian
Prussian
general and military theorist who stressed the "moral" (meaning, in modern terms, psychological) and political aspects of war. His most notable work, Vom Kriege (On War), was unfinished at his death
[...More...]

picture info

Baron Moser
Claus Adolf Moser, Baron Moser, KCB, CBE (24 November 1922 – 4 September 2015) was a British statistician who made major contributions in both academia and the Civil Service.[1][2] He prided himself rather on being a non-mathematical statistician, and said that the thing that frightened him most in his life was when Maurice Kendall asked him to teach a course on analysis of variance at the LSE.[3]Contents1 Life 2 The Claus Moser Research Centre 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Claus Adolf Moser was born in Berlin in 1922. His father was Dr Ernst (Ernest) Moser (1885–1957), owner of the Bank "Ernst Moser & Co." in Berlin (est. 1902, liquidated in 1937). His mother was Lotte (née Goldberg, 1897–1976), a talented amateur musician. In 1936 he moved to England with his parents and his brother Heinz Peter August. He went to Frensham Heights School
Frensham Heights School
and the London School of Economics (LSE)
[...More...]

picture info

Jean Monnet
Jean Omer Marie Gabriel Monnet (French: [ʒɑ̃ mɔnɛ]; 9 November 1888 – 16 March 1979) was a French political economist and diplomat. An influential supporter of European unity, he is considered as one of the founding fathers of the European Union
[...More...]

picture info

Robert Schuman
Jean-Baptiste Nicolas Robert Schuman
Robert Schuman
(French pronunciation: ​[ʁɔbɛʁ ʃuman]; 29 June 1886 – 4 September 1963) was a Luxembourg-born French statesman. Schuman was a Christian Democrat (MRP) and an independent political thinker and activist
[...More...]

picture info

List Of Countries By Military Expenditures
This article is a list of countries by military expenditure in a given year. Military
Military
expenditure figures are presented in United States dollars based on either constant or current exchange rates.[1] These results can vary greatly from one year to another based on fluctuations in the exchange rates of each country's currency
[...More...]

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1] .mw-parser-output .nobold f
[...More...]

Coercive
Coercion /koʊˈɜːrʃən/ is the practice of forcing another party to act in an involuntary manner by use of threats or force.[1] It involves a set of various types of forceful actions that violate the free will of an individual to induce a desired response, for example: a bully demanding lunch money from a student or the student gets beaten. These actions may include, but are not limited to: extortion, blackmail, torture, threats to induce favors, or even sexual assault. In law, coercion is codified as a duress crime. Such actions are used as leverage, to force the victim to act in a way contrary to their own interests. Coercion may involve the actual infliction of physical pain/injury or psychological harm in order to enhance the credibility of a threat
[...More...]

picture info

Competitive
Company competition, or competitiveness, pertains to the ability and performance of a firm, sub-sector or country to sell and supply goods and services in a given market, in relation to the ability and performance of other firms, sub-sectors or countries in the same market.Contents1 Firm competition 2 National competition2.1 History of competition2.1.1 1980's 2.1.2 1990's2.2 Role of infrastructure investments3 Trade competition3.1 Trade Competitiveness Index (TCI)4 Criticism 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksFirm competition[edit] Empirical observation confirms that resources (capital, labor, technology) and talent tend to concentrate geographically (Easterly and Levine 2002). This result reflects the fact that firms are embedded in inter-firm relationships with networks of suppliers, buyers and even competitors that help them to gain competitive advantages in the sale of its products and services
[...More...]

Social Influence
Social influence occurs when a person's emotions, opinions, or behaviors are affected by others.[1] Social influence takes many forms and can be seen in conformity, socialization, peer pressure, obedience, leadership, persuasion, sales, and marketing. In 1958, Harvard psychologist Herbert Kelman identified three broad varieties of social influence.[2]Compliance is when people appear to agree with others but actually keep their dissenting opinions private. Identification is when people are influenced by someone who is liked and respected, such as a famous celebrity. Internalization is when people accept a belief or behavior and agree both publicly and privately.Morton Deutsch and Harold Gerard described two psychological needs that lead humans to conform to the expectations of others
[...More...]

picture info

Concert Of Europe
The Concert of Europe, also known as the Congress System or the Vienna System after the Congress of Vienna, was a system of dispute resolution adopted by the major conservative powers of Europe to maintain their power, oppose revolutionary movements, weaken the forces of nationalism, and uphold the balance of power
[...More...]

picture info

Cold War
Part of a series on the History of the Cold WarOrigins of the Cold WarWorld War II(Hiroshima and Nagasaki)War conferencesEastern BlocWestern BlocIron Curtain Cold War
Cold War
(1947–1953) Cold War
Cold War
(1953–1962) Cold War
Cold War
(1962–1979) Cold War
Cold War
(1979–1985) Cold War
Cold War
(1985–1991)Frozen conflictsTimeline · ConflictsHistoriography Cold War
Cold War
IIThe Cold War
Cold War
was a period of geopolitical tension between the Soviet Union with its satellite states (the Eastern Bloc), and the United States with its allies (the Western Bloc) after World War II. The historiography of the conflict began between 1946 (the year U.S. diplomat George F
[...More...]

picture info

Yalta Conference
The Yalta
Yalta
Conference, also known as the Crimea
Crimea
Conference and code-named the Argonaut Conference, held from February 4 to the 11th 1945, was the World War II
World War II
meeting of the heads of government of the United States, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
for the purpose of discussing Germany
Germany
and Europe's postwar reorganization. The three states were represented by President Franklin D
[...More...]