HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Poverty Reduction
Poverty
Poverty
reduction, or poverty alleviation, is a set of measures, both economic and humanitarian, that are intended to permanently lift people out of poverty. Measures, like those promoted by Henry George
Henry George
in his economics classic Progress and Poverty, are those that raise, or are intended to raise, ways of enabling the poor to create wealth for themselves as a means of ending poverty forever. In modern times, various economists within the Georgism
Georgism
movement propose measures like the land value tax to enhance access to the natural world for all. Poverty
Poverty
occurs in both developing countries and developed countries
[...More...]

picture info

Maternal Mortality Rate
Maternal death
Maternal death
or maternal mortality is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as "the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes."[1] There are two
[...More...]

Transition Economy
A transition economy or transitional economy is an economy which is changing from a centrally planned economy to a market economy.[1] Transition economies undergo a set of structural transformations intended to develop market-based institutions. These include economic liberalization, where prices are set by market forces rather than by a central planning organization
[...More...]

picture info

Smallpox
Smallpox
Smallpox
was an infectious disease caused by one of two virus variants, Variola major and Variola minor.[7] The last naturally occurring case was diagnosed in October 1977 and the World Health Organization certified the global eradication of the disease in 1980.[10] The risk of death following contracting the disease was about 30%, with higher rates among babies.[6][11] Often those who survive have extensive scarring of their skin and some are left blind.[6] The initial symptoms of the disease include fever and vomiting.[5] This is then followed by formation of sores in
[...More...]

picture info

Development Aid
Development aid
Development aid
or development cooperation (also development assistance, technical assistance, international aid, overseas aid, official development assistance (ODA), or foreign aid) is financial aid given by governments and other agencies to support the economic, environmental, social, and political development of developing countries
[...More...]

picture info

Tied Aid
Tied aid
Tied aid
is foreign aid that must be spent in the country providing the aid (the donor country) or in a group of selected countries. A developed country will provide a bilateral loan or grant to a developing country, but mandate that the money be spent on goods or services produced in the selected country
[...More...]

picture info

Peter Singer
Peter Albert David Singer, AC (born 6 July 1946) is an Australian moral philosopher. He is the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton University, and a Laureate Professor at the Centre for Applied Philosophy
Philosophy
and Public Ethics
Ethics
at the University of Melbourne. He specialises in applied ethics and approaches ethical issues from a secular, utilitarian perspective. He is known in particular for his book Animal Liberation (1975), in which he argues in favour of vegetarianism, and his essay "Famine, Affluence, and Morality", in which he argues in favour of donating to help the global poor
[...More...]

picture info

The Life You Can Save
The Life You Can Save: Acting Now to End World Poverty
Poverty
is a 2009 book by Australian philosopher Peter Singer. The author argues that citizens of affluent nations are behaving immorally if they do not act to end the poverty they know to exist in developing nations. The book is focused on giving to charity, and discusses philosophical considerations, describes practical and psychological obstacles to giving, and lists available resources for prospective donors (e.g. charity evaluators)
[...More...]

picture info

Collective Farming
Collective
Collective
farming and communal farming are various types of "agricultural production in which multiple farmers run their holdings as a joint enterprise".[1] That type of collective is often an agricultural cooperative in which member-owners jointly engage in farming activities. The process by which farmland is aggregated is called collectivization. In some countries (including the Soviet Union, the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
countries, China
China
and Vietnam), there have been state-run and cooperative-run variants
[...More...]

picture info

Free Market
In economics, a free market is an idealized system in which the prices for goods and services are determined by the open market and consumers, in which the laws and forces of supply and demand are free from any intervention by a government, price-setting monopoly, or other authority. Proponents of the concept of free market contrast it with a regulated market, in which a government intervenes in supply and demand through various methods such as tariffs used to restrict trade and protect the economy. In an idealized free market economy, prices for goods and services are set freely by the forces of supply and demand and are allowed to reach their point of equilibrium without intervention by government policy. In scholarly debates, the concept of a free market is contrasted with the concept of a coordinated market in fields of study such as political economy, new institutional economics, economic sociology, and political science
[...More...]

picture info

Fertilizer
A fertilizer (American English) or fertiliser (British English; see spelling differences) is any material of natural or synthetic origin (other than liming materials) that is applied to soils or to plant tissues to supply one or more plant nutrients essential to the growth of plants.Contents1 Mechanism 2 Classification2.1 Single nutrient ("straight") fertilizers 2.2 Multinutrient fertilizers2.2.1 Binary (NP, NK, PK) fertilizers 2.2.2 NPK fertilizers2.3 Micronutrients3 Production3.1 Nitrogen
Nitrogen
fertilizers 3.2
[...More...]

picture info

Soviet Union
The Soviet Union
Soviet Union
(Russian: Сове́тский Сою́з, tr. Sovétsky Soyúz, IPA: [sɐˈvʲɛt͡skʲɪj sɐˈjus] ( listen)), officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian: Сою́з Сове́тских Социалисти́ческих Респу́блик, tr. Soyúz Sovétskikh Sotsialistícheskikh Respúblik, IPA: [sɐˈjus sɐˈvʲɛtskʲɪx sətsɨəlʲɪsˈtʲitɕɪskʲɪx rʲɪˈspublʲɪk] ( listen)), abbreviated as the USSR (Russian: СССР, tr. SSSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia
Eurasia
that existed from 1922 to 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics,[a] its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow
Moscow
as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic
[...More...]

picture info

Trade Liberalization
Free trade
Free trade
is a free market policy followed by some international markets in which countries' governments do not restrict imports from, or exports to, other countries. In government, free trade is predominately advocated by political parties that hold right-wing economic positions, while economically left-wing political parties generally support protectionism.[1][2][3][4] Most nations are today members of the World Trade Organization
World Trade Organization
(WTO) multilateral trade agreements. Free trade
Free trade
is additionally exemplified by the European Economic Area
European Economic Area
and the Mercosur, which have established open markets
[...More...]

Physical Capital
In economics, physical capital or just capital is a factor of production (or input into the process of production), consisting of machinery, buildings, computers, and the like. The production function takes the general form Y=f(K, L), where Y is the amount of output produced, K is the amount of capital stock used and L is the amount of labor used. In economic theory, physical capital is one of the three primary factors of production, also known as inputs in the production function. The others are natural resources (including land), and labor—the stock of competences embodied in the labor force. "Physical" is used to distinguish physical capital from human capital (a result of investment in the human agent), circulating capital, and financial capital.[1][2] "Physical capital" is fixed capital, any kind of real physical asset that is not used up in the production of a product
[...More...]

picture info

Remittance
A remittance is a transfer of money by a foreign worker to an individual in his or her home country. Money sent home by migrants competes with international aid as one of the largest financial inflows to developing countries. Workers' remittances are a significant part of international capital flows, especially with regard to labour-exporting countries.[1] In 2014, $436 billion went to developing countries, setting a new record. Overall global remittances totaled $582 billion in 2015.[2] Some countries, such as India
India
and China, receive tens of billions of US dollars in remittances each year from their expatriates and diaspora
[...More...]

picture info

Foreign Direct Investment
A foreign direct investment (FDI) is an investment in the form of a controlling ownership in a business in one country by an entity based in another country.[1] It is thus distinguished from a foreign portfolio investment by a notion of direct control. The origin of the investment does not impact the definition, as an FDI: the investment may be made either "inorganically" by buying a company in the target country or "organically" by expanding the operations of an existing business in that country.Contents1 Definitions 2 Theoretical background 3 Types of FDI 4 Methods4.1 Forms of FDI incentives5 Importance and barriers to FDI5.1 Developing world 5.2 China 5.3 India 5.4 United States 5.5 Canada 5.6 United Kingdom 5.7 Armenia 5.8 Russian Federation6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinitions[edit] Broadly, foreign direct investment includes "mergers and acquisitions, building new facilities, reinvesting profits earned from ov
[...More...]

.