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Post-punk
Post-punk
Post-punk
(originally called new musick[2]) is a broad type of rock music that emerged from the punk movement of the 1970s, in which artists departed from the simplicity and traditionalism of punk rock to adopt a variety of avant-garde sensibilities
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Modernist Art
Modern art
Modern art
includes artistic work produced during the period extending roughly from the 1860s to the 1970s, and denotes the styles and philosophy of the art produced during that era.[1] The term is usually associated with art in which the traditions of the past have been thrown aside in a spirit of experimentation.[2] Modern artists experimented with new ways of seeing and with fresh ideas about the nature of materials and functions of art. A tendency away from the narrative, which was characteristic for the traditional arts, toward abstraction is characteristic of much modern art
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Cliche
A cliché or cliche (/ˈkliːʃeɪ/ or /klɪˈʃeɪ/) is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being trite or irritating, especially when at some earlier time it was considered meaningful or novel.[1] In phraseology, the term has taken on a more technical meaning, referring to an expression imposed by conventionalized linguistic usage
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Avant-garde
The avant-garde (/ˌævɒ̃ˈɡɑːrd/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[avɑ̃ɡaʁd];[2] from French, "advance guard" or "vanguard", literally "fore-guard")[3] are people or works that are experimental, radical, or unorthodox with respect to art, culture, or society.[3][4][5] It may be characterized by nontraditional, aesthetic innovation and initial unacceptability,[6] and it may offer a critique of the relationship between producer and consumer.[4] The avant-garde pushes the boundaries of what is accepted as the norm or the status quo, primarily in the cultural realm. The avant-garde is considered by some to be a hallmark of modernism, as distinct from postmodernism[citation needed]
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World Music
World music
World music
(also called global music or international music[1]) is a musical category encompassing many different styles of music from around the globe, which includes many genres including some forms of Western music represented by folk music, as well as selected forms of ethnic music, indigenous music, neotraditional music, and music where more than one cultural tradition, such as ethnic music and Western popular music, intermingle. World music's inclusive nature and elasticity as a musical category may pose for some obstacles to a universal definition, but its ethic of interest in the culturally exotic is enca
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DIY Ethic
DIY ethic
DIY ethic
refers to the ethic of self-sufficiency through completing tasks without the aid of a paid expert. Literally meaning "do it yourself", the DIY ethic
DIY ethic
promotes the idea that anyone is capable of performing a variety of tasks rather than relying on paid specialists. The DIY ethic
DIY ethic
requires that the adherent seeks out the knowledge required to complete a given task. The term can refer to a variety of disciplines, including home improvement, first aid or creative works. Rather than belittling or showing disdain for those who engage in manual labor or skilled crafts, DIY champions the average individual seeking such knowledge and expertise
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Free Jazz
Free jazz
Free jazz
is an approach to jazz music that was first developed in the 1950s and 60s as musicians attempted to alter, extend, or break down jazz convention, often by discarding fixed chord changes or tempos. Though the music of free jazz composers varied widely, a common feature was dissatisfaction with the limitations of bebop, hard bop, and modal jazz that had developed in the 1940s and 50s. Often described as avant-garde, free jazz has also been described as an attempt to return jazz to its primitive, often religious, roots and emphasis on collective improvisation. As its name implies, free jazz cannot be defined more than loosely, as many musicians draw on free jazz concepts and idioms, and it was never completely distinct as a genre
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Black Music
Black music is a term encompassing music produced or inspired by black people, including Sub-Saharan African music traditions
Sub-Saharan African music traditions
and African popular music as well as the music genres of the African diaspora, including Afro-Caribbean music and African American music. These genres include negro spiritual, gospel, blues, jazz, R&B, rock and roll, soul, funk, ska, reggae, dub reggae, house, detroit techno and hip hop.Contents1 Background 2 Genres 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingBackground[edit] Music
Music
is a monumental part of Black culture because it has the power to unify people, and cross borders. Just one song can have the power to bring millions of people from all different backgrounds together. It is a matter of taste and opinions, not intellectual arguments. Another important fact that ties music to black communities is that it has visible roots in Africa
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Music Production
A record producer or track producer or music producer oversees and manages the sound recording and production of a band or performer's music, which may range from recording one song to recording a lengthy concept album.[1] A producer has many roles during the recording process.[2] The roles of a producer vary. They may gather musical ideas for the project, collaborate with the artists to select cover tunes or original songs by the artist/group, work with artists and help them to improve their songs, lyrics or arrangements. A producer may also:Select session musicians to play rhythm section accompaniment parts or solos Co-write.[3] Propose changes to the song arrangements, and Coach the singers and musicians in the studioThe producer typically supervises the entire process from preproduction, through to the sound recording and mixing stages, and, in some cases, all the way to the audio mastering stage
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Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
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Electronic Music
Electronic music
Electronic music
is music that employs electronic musical instruments, digital instruments and circuitry-based music technology. In general, a distinction can be made between sound produced using electromechanical means (electroacoustic music), and that produced using electronics only.[1] Electromechanical instruments include mechanical elements, such as strings, hammers, and so on, and electric elements, such as magnetic pickups, power amplifiers and loudspeakers. Examples of electromechanical sound producing devices include the telharmonium, Hammond organ, and the electric guitar, which are typically made loud enough for performers and audiences to hear with an instrument amplifier and speaker cabinet. Pure electronic instruments do not have vibrating strings, hammers, or other sound-producing mechanisms
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Glam Rock
Glam rock
Glam rock
is a style of rock that developed in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the early 1970s performed by musicians who wore outrageous costumes, makeup, and hairstyles, particularly platform shoes and glitter.[1] Glam artists drew on diverse sources across music and throwaway culture,[2] ranging from bubblegum pop and '50s rock and roll to cabaret, science fiction, and complex art rock.[3][4] The flamboyant clothing and visual styles of performers were often camp or androgynous, and have been described as playing with nontraditional gender roles.[5] " Glitter
Glitter
rock" was another term used to refer to a more extreme version of glam.[6] The UK charts were inundated with glam rock acts from 1971 to 1975, with glam also manifesting in all areas of British popular culture during this period.[7] The March 1971 appearance of T
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Avant-garde Music
Avant-garde
Avant-garde
music is music that is considered to be at the forefront of experimentation or innovation in its field, with the term "avant-garde" implying a critique of existing aesthetic conventions, rejection of the status quo in favor of unique or original elements, and the idea of deliberately challenging or alienating audiences.[1]Contents1 Distinctions 2 Popular music 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDistinctions[edit] Further information: Avant-garde <
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Recording Studio As Musical Instrument
The use of recording studios as a distinct musical instrument or compositional tool began in the early to mid 20th-century, as composers started exploiting the newfound potentials of multitrack recording.[1] Before the late 1940s, musical recordings were created with the idea of presenting a faithful rendition of a real-life performance
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Neue Deutsche Welle
Neue Deutsche Welle
Neue Deutsche Welle
(NDW, pronounced [ˈnɔʏə ˈdɔʏtʃə ˈvɛlə], "New German Wave") is a genre of West German rock music originally derived from post-punk and new wave music with electronic influences.[1] The term "Neue Deutsche Welle" was first used in a record shop advertisement by Burkhardt Seiler[2] in the West German magazine Sounds in August 1979, and then coined by journalist Alfred Hilsberg whose article about the movement titled "Neue Deutsche Welle — Aus grauer Städte Mauern" ("New German Wave — From Grey Cities' Walls") was published in Sounds in October 1979.[3]Contents1 History 2 Notable bands2.1 Underground 2.2 Mainstream3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]D.A.F
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Industrial Music
Industrial music
Industrial music
is a genre of electronic music and experimental music which draws on harsh, transgressive or provocative sounds and themes. AllMusic defines industrial music as the "most abrasive and aggressive fusion of rock and electronic music"; "initially a blend of avant-garde electronics experiments (tape music, musique concrète, white noise, synthesizers, sequencers, etc.) and punk provocation".[2] The term was coined in the mid-1970s with the founding of Industrial Records by members of Throbbing Gristle
Throbbing Gristle
and Monte Cazazza. While the genre name originated with Throbbing Gristle's emergence in the United Kingdom, concentrations of artists and labels vital to the genre also emerged in Chicago. The first industrial artists experimented with noise and aesthetically controversial topics, musically and visually, such as fascism, sexual perversion, and the occult
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