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Portsmouth Earthworks
The Portsmouth Earthworks
Portsmouth Earthworks
are a large prehistoric mound complex constructed by the Ohio
Ohio

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Kinzer Mound
The Kinzer Mound
Kinzer Mound
is a Native American mound in Ross County, Ohio, United States. Located outside of the village of South Salem,[1] the mound sits on high ground far from any stream. Built in a sub-conical shape; it is 7.6 feet (2.3 m) tall and has a diameter of approximately 70 feet (21 m).[2] Due to the mound's location and shape, it is believed to have been built by people of the Adena culture. If this is correct, the mound is likely to contain the remains of a wooden structure used for ceremonial purposes.[2] As such, it is a potential archaeological site. In recognition of its prehistoric significance, the Kinzer Mound was listed on the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1974.[1] References[edit]^ a b c National Park Service
National Park Service
(2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places
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Ancient Monuments Of The Mississippi Valley
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley
Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley
(full title Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley: Comprising the Results of Extensive Original Surveys and Explorations) (1848) by the Americans Ephraim George Squier and Edwin Hamilton Davis is a landmark in American scientific research, the study of the prehistoric indigenous mound builders of North America, and the early development of archaeology as a scientific discipline
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Arledge Mounds I And II
The Arledge Mounds are a pair of Native American mounds in the south central part of the U.S. state of Ohio. Located near Circleville in Pickaway County,[1] the two mounds lie in the middle of a farm field, far from any roads. These two mounds are disparate in size: while the smaller mound's height is 5 feet (1.5 m), the other's is 20 feet (6.1 m), and their diameters are approximately 65 feet (20 m) and 120 feet (37 m) respectively.[3]:1140 Most unusual is the proximity of the mounds to each other — while many groups of mounds are known in Ohio,[3]:1238, 1362, 1371 they are not typically connected at the base as these two mounds are; only the Arledge Mounds and the McMurray Mounds, which straddled the border between Franklin and Madison counties, are known to have been conjoined
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Austin Brown Mound
The Austin Brown Mound, also known as the "Dwight Fullerton Mound," is a subconical Native American mound located northwest of the city of Chillicothe in Ross County, Ohio, United States.[1] In 1897, the Ohio Historical Society sponsored an excavation of the mound under the leadership of Clarence Loveberry, who oversaw the digging of a large tunnel into the mound's side. Loveberry's investigation yielded artifacts of the Adena culture and evidence of rotten logs on the floor of the mound, but in publishing the results of his excavation, he observed that neither a tomb nor any isolated burials were discovered within the mound
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Coon Hunters Mound
The Coon Hunters Mound is a Native American mound in the central part of the U.S. state of Ohio. Located near the village of Carroll,[1] it sits on the grounds of the Central Ohio Coonhunters Association.[2]:393 The Coon Hunters Mound is a large structure, measuring 5.5 feet (1.7 m) high and 65 feet (20 m) in diameter at its base. Due to its shape and location, it is believed to have been built by people of the Adena culture, who inhabited southern and central Ohio from approximately 500 BC to approximately AD 400. Mounds such as Coon Hunters were typically constructed as burial mounds atop the graves of leading members of Adena society
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George Deffenbaugh Mound
The George Deffenbaugh Mound
George Deffenbaugh Mound
is a Native American mound in the southeastern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio. Located northeast of Laurelville in Hocking County,[2] the mound sits on a ridgeline; it is 6.5 feet (2.0 m) tall and approximately 50 feet (15 m) in diameter
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Fortner Mounds
The Fortner Mounds are a pair of Native American mounds in the central part of the U.S. state of Ohio. Located northeast of the city of Pickerington in Fairfield County,[2] they are two of several mounds in the Pickerington vicinity, but the only pair of mounds in the area. As such, they are of special interest to archaeologists: some of the mound-building peoples of prehistoric North America lived in groups of two or three houses, which were often covered with piles of earth when the families would move to other places. Therefore, it is likely that these mounds cover groups of postholes, and buried bodies may also be located within them
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Smithsonian Institution
The Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Institution
(/smɪθˈsoʊniən/ smith-SOH-nee-ən), established on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States.[1] The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson.[2] Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.[3] Termed "the nation's attic"[4] for its eclectic holdings of 154 million items,[2] the Institution's nineteen museums, nine research centers, and zoo include historical and architectural landmarks, mostly located in the District of Columbia.[5] Additional facilities are located in Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York City, Pittsburgh, Texas, Virginia, and Panama
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Shawnee
The Shawnee
Shawnee
(Shaawanwaki, Ša˙wano˙ki and Shaawanowi lenaweeki[3]) are an Algonquian-speaking ethnic group indigenous to North America. In colonial times they were a semi-migratory Native American nation, primarily inhabiting areas of the Ohio
Ohio
Valley, extending from what became Ohio
Ohio
and Kentucky
Kentucky
eastward to West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Western Maryland; south to Alabama
Alabama
and South Carolina; and westward to Indiana, and Illinois. Pushed west by European-American pressure, the Shawnee
Shawnee
migrated to Missouri
Missouri
and Kansas, with some removed to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
(Oklahoma) west of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the 1830s
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Protohistory
Protohistory is a period between prehistory and history, during which a culture or civilization has not yet developed writing but other cultures have already noted its existence in their own writings. For example, in Europe, the Celts and the Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
are considered to have been protohistoric when they began appearing in Greek and Roman sources. Protohistoric may also refer to the transition period between the advent of literacy in a society and the writings of the first historians. The preservation of oral traditions may complicate matters as these can provide a secondary historical source for even earlier events. Colonial sites involving a literate group and a non-literate group are also studied as protohistoric situations. It can also refer to a period in which fragmentary or external historical documents, not necessarily including a developed writing system, have been found
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Hillside Haven Mound
The Hillside Haven Mound
Hillside Haven Mound
(designated 33-Cn-14[1]) is a Native American mound in the southwestern part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Ohio. Located southwest of Oakland in Clinton County,[3] it sits in dense woodland on the side of a hill. It is believed to have been conical in shape at the time of construction, but today it is rounded in shape, measuring 2.5 feet (0.76 m) high and 33 feet (10 m) in diameter.[4] During a test excavation of the mound and its immediate vicinity, archaeologists from Wilmington College found pieces of Adena pottery around the mound. Judging by findings from other Adena mound sites, the Hillside Haven Mound
Hillside Haven Mound
is believed to be a burial mound built over the body of a leading member of Adena society
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Conrad Mound Archeological Site
The Conrad Mound Archeological Site is an archaeological site in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Ohio. Located east of Cleves in Hamilton County,[3] the site is centered on an isolated Native American mound. Its location atop a ridgeline has been interpreted as evidence that the mound was constructed by the Adena culture. No artifacts have been found at the site, for no archaeological excavation has ever been carried out; however, experience with other sites has led archaeologists to surmise that the mound is surrounded by a larger zone of archaeological interest.[4] Because of its potential archaeological value, the mound was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[1] References[edit]^ a b National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ Koleszar, Stephen C
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