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Portrait
A portrait is a painting, photograph, sculpture, or other artistic representation of a person, in which the face and its expression is predominant. The intent is to display the likeness, personality, and even the mood of the person. For this reason, in photography a portrait is generally not a snapshot, but a composed image of a person in a still position. A portrait often shows a person looking directly at the painter or photographer, in order to most successfully engage the subject with the viewer.Contents1 History 2 Self-portraiture 3 Official portrait 4 Portrait
Portrait
photography 5 Politics 6 Literature 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: Portrait
Portrait
paintingMoche ceramic portrait. Larco Museum
Larco Museum
Collection
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Angoulême
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Angoulême
Angoulême
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃ɡulɛm] ( listen); Poitevin-Saintongeais: Engoulaeme; Occitan: Engoleime) is a commune, the capital of the Charente
Charente
department, in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region of southwestern France. The inhabitants of the commune are known as Angoumoisins or Angoumoisines.[1] Located on a plateau overlooking a meander of the Charente
Charente
River, the city is nicknamed the "balcony of the southwest"
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Lagash
Lagash[4]/ˈleɪɡæʃ/ (cuneiform: 𒉢𒁓𒆷𒆠 LAGAŠKI; Sumerian: Lagaš) is an ancient city located northwest of the junction of the Euphrates
Euphrates
and Tigris
Tigris
rivers and east of Uruk, about 22 kilometres (14 mi) east of the modern town of Ash Shatrah, Iraq. Lagash
Lagash
(modern Al-Hiba) was one of the oldest cities of the Ancient Near East. The ancient site of Nina (modern Surghul) is around 10 km (6.2 mi) away and marks the southern limit of the state
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Vilhonneur
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Vilhonneur
Vilhonneur
is a commune in the Charente
Charente
department in southwestern France.Contents1 History 2 Population 3 Sights 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Vilhonneur
Vilhonneur
was located on the Angoulême-Limoges Roman road, which was also known as the "English Road" (chemin des Anglais) . The Rochebertier tower is mentioned in a confession to Philip the Bold in 1276. A medieval castle, of which exist only traces of the foundations, is located on a hillock
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Cave Paintings
Cave
Cave
paintings are also known as "parietal art". They are painted drawings on cave walls or ceilings, mainly of prehistoric origin, dated to some 40,000 years ago (around 38,000 BCE) in Eurasia. The exact purpose of the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
cave paintings is not known. Evidence suggests that they were not merely decorations of living areas since the caves in which they have been found do not have signs of ongoing habitation. They are also often located in areas of caves that are not easily accessible. Some theories hold that cave paintings may have been a way of communicating with others, while other theories ascribe a religious or ceremonial purpose to them. The paintings are remarkably similar around the world, with animals being common subjects that give the most impressive images
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New-York Historical Society
The New-York Historical Society
New-York Historical Society
is an American history museum and library located in New York City
New York City
at the corner of 77th Street and Central Park West
Central Park West
in Manhattan, founded in 1804 as New York's first museum. The New-York Historical Society
New-York Historical Society
presents exhibitions, public programs, and research that explore the rich history of New York and the nation. The New-York Historical Society
New-York Historical Society
Museum & Library has been at its present location since 1908. The granite building was designed by York & Sawyer in a classic Roman Eclectic style
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Painterly
Painterliness
Painterliness
is a concept based on the German term malerisch (painterly), a word popularized by Swiss art historian Heinrich Wölfflin (1864–1945) to help focus, enrich and standardize the terms being used by art historians of his time to characterize works of art. It is the opposite of linear, plastic or formal linear design.[1] An oil painting is painterly when there are visible brushstrokes, the result of applying paint in a less than completely controlled manner, generally without closely following carefully drawn lines. Works characterized as either painterly or linear can be produced with any painting media: oils, acrylics, watercolors, gouache, etc. Some artists whose work could be characterized as painterly are Pierre Bonnard, Francis Bacon, Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt, Renoir, and John Singer Sargent
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William Shew
William
William
is a popular given name of an old Germanic origin.[1] It became very popular in the English language
English language
after the Norman conquest of England in 1066,[2] and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Willy, Bill, and Billy. A common Irish form is Liam. Female forms are Willa, Willemina, Willamette, Wilma and Wilhelmina. Etymology[edit]This article is missing information about the etymology of "Bill". Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (October 2015) William
William
comes ultimately from the given name Wilhelm (cf. Old German Wilhelm > German Wilhelm and Old Norse
Old Norse
Vilhjálmr)
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Roger Fenton
Roger Fenton
Roger Fenton
(28 March 1819 – 8 August 1869) was a pioneering British photographer, one of the first war photographers.Contents1 Early life 2 Crimean War 3 Post Crimea 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Fenton was born in Crimble Hall, Rochdale, Lancashire, on 28 March 1819. His grandfather was a wealthy cotton manufacturer and banker, his father a banker and Member of Parliament.[1] Fenton was the fourth of seven children by his father's first marriage
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Early Middle Ages
The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or Early Medieval Period, typically regarded as lasting from the 6th century
6th century
to the 10th century
10th century
CE, marked the start of the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
of European history. The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
followed the decline of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
and preceded the High Middle Ages (c. 10th to 13th centuries). The Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
overlap with Late Antiquity. The term "Late Antiquity" is used to emphasize elements of continuity with the Roman Empire, while "Early Middle Ages" is used to emphasize developments characteristic of the later medieval period. The period saw a continuation of trends begun during late classical antiquity, including population decline, especially in urban centres, a decline of trade, and increased immigration
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Politics
Politics
Politics
(from Greek: πολιτικά, translit. Politiká, meaning "affairs of the cities") is the process of making decisions that apply to members of a group.[1] It refers to achieving and exercising positions of governance—organized control over a human community, particularly a state.[2] In modern nation states, people have formed political parties to represent their ideas. They agree to take the same position on many issues, and agree to support the same changes to law and the same leaders.[3] An election is usually a competition between different parties.[4] Some examples of political parties are the African National Congress (ANC) in South Africa, the Tories
Tories
in Great Britain
Great Britain
and the Indian National Congress. Politics
Politics
is a multifaceted word
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Sumeria
Sumer (/ˈsuːmər/)[note 1] is the earliest known civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq, during the Chalcolithic and Early Bronze ages, and arguably the first civilization in the world with Ancient Egypt and the Indus Valley.[1] Living along the valleys of the Tigris and Euphrates, Sumerian farmers were able to grow an abundance of grain and other crops, the surplus of which enabled them to settle in one place. Proto-writing in the prehistory dates back to c. 3000 BC. The earliest texts come from the cities of Uruk and Jemdet Nasr and date back to 3300 BC; early cuneiform script writing emerged in 3000 BC.[2] Modern historians have suggested that Sumer was first permanently settled between c
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Fresco
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Statues Of Gudea
A statue is a sculpture, representing one or more people or animals (including abstract concepts allegorically represented as people or animals), free-standing (as opposed to a relief) and normally full-length (as opposed to a bust) and at least close to life-size, or larger.[1] A small statue, usually small enough to be picked up, is called a statuette or figurine, while one that is more than twice life-size is called a colossal statue.[2] The definition of a statue is not always clear-cut; equestrian statues, of a person on a horse, are certainly included, and in many cases, such as a Madonna and Child
Madonna and Child
or a Pietà, a sculpture of two people will also be. Statues have been produced in many cultures from prehistory to the present; the oldest known statue dating to about 30,000 years ago
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Sovereign State
A sovereign state is, in international law, a nonphysical juridical entity that is represented by one centralized government that has sovereignty over a geographic area
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