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Asinaria, which has been translated as The One with the Asses, is a comic play written in Latin
Latin
by the Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus
Plautus
and is known as one of the great works of ancient Roman comedy. It is famous for containing the lines "Lupus est homo homini, non homo, quom qualis sit non novit," which has been translated as "A man is a wolf rather than a man to another man, when he hasn't yet found out what he's like." and "Facias ipse quod faciamus nobis suades," which has been translated as "Practice yourself what you preach."Contents1 Synopsis 2 Analysis2.1 Characters 2.2 Themes3 Translations 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] The play takes place in Athens, near the homes of the old man Demaenetus and the procuress Cleareta. Demaenetus is submissive to his wife Artemona, but wishes to help his son Argyrippus gain money to free his lover, Cleareta's hetaera Philenium
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Plautus
Titus Maccius Plautus
Plautus
(/ˈplɔːtəs/; c. 254 – 184 BC), commonly known as Plautus, was a Roman playwright of the Old Latin
Old Latin
period. His comedies are the earliest Latin
Latin
literary works to have survived in their entirety. He wrote Palliata comoedia, the genre devised by the innovator of Latin
Latin
literature, Livius Andronicus
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Miles Gloriosus (play)
Miles Gloriosus is a comedic play written by Titus Maccius Plautus
Plautus
(c. 254–184 B.C.). The title can be translated as "The Swaggering Soldier" or "Vainglorious Soldier". His source for Miles Gloriosus was a Greek play, now lost, called Alazon
Alazon
or The Braggart. Although the characters in Miles Gloriosus speak Latin, they are Greeks and largely have Greek names, clothing, and customs
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Casina (play)
Casina is a Latin play by the early Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. Plautus
Plautus
often employed "stock" characters in his plays. For example, the slave who is free born, the wife who is smarter than her husband, the "dirty old man" chasing after the young lady. In Casina, all three of these are seen.Contents1 Plot 2 Translations 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] The action takes place on the streets of Athens, and all the characters are Greek. The plot revolves about a beautiful girl, Casina, who is being fought over by two men. She was abandoned at the door of Lysidamus and his wife Cleostrata, and has been raised as a servant. Euthynicus, son of Lysidamus, has fallen in love with Casina and wants to marry her. As the wedding approaches, however, Lysidamus desires Casina for himself, and devises an elaborate ruse to get Euthynicus out to the country and have Casina marry his servant Olympio instead
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Cistellaria
Cistellaria is a comedic Latin
Latin
play by the early Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. Translations[edit]English translation by Henry Thomas Riley at Perseus: Cistellaria Wolfang de Melo, 2011 [1]References[edit]^ Plautus; Translated by Wolfgang de Melo (2011). Plautus, Vol II: Casina; The Casket Comedy; Curculio; Epidicus; The Two Menaechmuses. Loeb Classical Library
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Curculio (play)
Curculio, also called The Weevil, is a Latin comedic play for the early Roman theatre by Titus Maccius Plautus. It is the shortest of Plautus's surviving plays.Contents1 Plot 2 Translations 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] In Curculio, Phaedromus is in love with Planesium, a slave girl belonging to the pimp Cappadox. Phaedromus sends Curculio (a stock parasite character) to borrow money. Unsuccessful, Curculio happens to run into Therapontigonus, a soldier who intends to purchase Planesium. After Curculio learns of his plans, he steals the soldier's ring and returns to Phaedromus. They fake a letter and seal it using the ring. Curculio takes it to the soldier's banker Lyco, tricking him into thinking he was sent by Therapontigonus. Lyco pays Cappadox, under the conditions that the money will be returned if it is later discovered that she is freeborn. Curculio takes the girl back to Phaedromus
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Epidicus
Epidicus is an ancient Roman play written by T. Maccius Plautus. It is said to be one of Plautus's favorite works. Epidicus is the name of the main character, who is a slave. The plot takes many turns as Epidicus tries to please his master's son, Stratippocles. The main plot was based upon a Greek play, however the story line was changed in order to prevent a brother from marrying his half-sister. This change was made because Romans considered this incest, which deeply disturbed them; the Greeks, however, were not bothered by this. Characters[edit]Periphanes – an aged Athenian
Athenian
who has a son in wedlock, Stratippocles. Had a relationship with a Theban woman, Philippa and had an illegitimate daughter, Telestis, who lives with her mother in Thebes. Stratippocles – son of Periphanes, is summoned to war in Thebes between the Athenians and Thebans
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Menaechmi
Menaechmi, a Latin-language play, is often considered Plautus' greatest play. The title is sometimes translated as The Brothers Menaechmus or The Two Menaechmuses. The Menaechmi
Menaechmi
is a comedy about mistaken identity, involving a set of twins, Menaechmus of Epidamnus
Epidamnus
and Menaechmus of Syracuse. It incorporates various Roman stock characters including the parasite, the comic courtesan, the comic servant, the domineering wife, the doddering father-in-law and the quack doctor. As with most of Plautus' plays, much of the dialogue was sung.[1]Contents1 Plot 2 Adaptations and influences 3 Translations 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] Moschus has twin sons, Menaechmus and Sosicles. Moschus decides to take only one of the twins, Menaechmus, with him on a business trip, while the twins are still young. During the trip, Menaechmus is abducted and adopted by a businessman who lives in Epidamnus, separating the twins
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Mercator (play)
Mercator, or The Merchant, is a Latin comedic play for the early Roman theatre by Titus Maccius Plautus. It is based on the Greek play Emporos (the Merchant) by the Greek comedy playwright Philemon
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Mostellaria
Mostellaria is a play by the Roman author Plautus. Its name translates from Latin
Latin
as The Haunted House (with the word Domus understood in the title). It is a comedy with a very linear plot
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Bacchides (play)
Bacchides is a Latin play by the early Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. The title has been translated as The Bacchises, and the plot revolves around the misunderstandings surrounding two sisters, each called Bacchis, who work in a local house of ill-repute
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Persa (play)
Persa is a comedic Latin
Latin
play by the early Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. Translations[edit]English translation by Henry Thomas Riley at Perseus: Persa Amy Richlin, 2005 Wolfang de Melo, 2011 [1]References[edit]^ Plautus; Translated by Wolfgang de Melo (2011). Plautus, Vol III: The Merchant; The Braggart Soldier; The Ghost; The Persian. Loeb Classical Library
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Poenulus
Poenulus, also called The Little Carthaginian
Carthaginian
or The Little Punic, is a Latin comedic play for the early Roman theatre by Titus Maccius Plautus, probably written between 195 and 189 BC.[1] The play is noteworthy for containing text in Carthaginian
Carthaginian
Punic, spoken by the character Hanno in the fifth act.[2]Contents1 Plot 2 Translations 3 References 4 External linksPlot[edit] Agorastocles is in love with a woman named Adelphasium who is a slave that belongs to the pimp Lycus. Like Agorastocles, she and her sister Anterastilis were stolen (as children) from Carthage and sold. Agorastocles was purchased as an adopted son, whereas the girls were bought to become prostitutes. Milphio, the slave of Agorastocles, attempts to help his master obtain Adelphasium. Their plan is to trick Lycus and get him into legal trouble
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Pseudolus
Pseudolus is a play by the ancient Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. It is one of the earliest examples of Roman literature. The play begins with the shortest prologue of any of the known plays of Plautus, though it is not known whether Plautus
Plautus
wrote this prologue himself or if it was added later. Pseudolus was first shown in 191 B.C
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Rudens (play)
Rudens is a play by Roman author Plautus, thought to have been written around 211 BC. Its name translates from Latin
Latin
as 'The Rope'. It is a comedy, which describes how a girl, Palaestra, stolen from her parents by pirates, is reunited with her father, Daemones, ironically, by means of her pimp, Labrax. The story is, however, far more complex; in particular, humour is derived from the interactions between slaves and masters, and the changes in friendships throughout. The play is set in Cyrene, in northern Africa, although the characters come from a range of cities around the Mediterranean, most notably, Athens.Contents1 The story 2 Modern versions2.1 The Storm 2.2 Tug of War3 Translations 4 References 5 External linksThe story[edit]This article's plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise
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Stichus
Stichus is a comedic Latin
Latin
play by the early Roman playwright Titus Maccius Plautus. Translations[edit]English translation by Henry Thomas Riley at Perseus: Stichus Wolfang de Melo, 2013 [1]References[edit]^ Plautus; Translated by Wolfgang de Melo (2013). Plautus, Vol V: Stichus; Three-Dollar Day; Truculentus; The Tale of a Traveling-Bag. Loeb Classical Library
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