HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Port Authority Of Allegheny County
Port Authority of Allegheny County
Port Authority of Allegheny County
(also known as the Port Authority and formerly as Port Authority Transit (PAT) and PATransit) is the second-largest public transit agency in Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the 26th-largest in the United States.[3] The county-owned, state-funded agency is based in Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
and is overseen by a CEO and a nine-member board of unpaid volunteer directors, who are appointed by the county executive and approved by the county council.[4] The Port Authority's bus, light rail and funicular system covers Allegheny County. On a few of its longer-distance routes, service extends into neighboring counties such as Beaver, Washington, and Westmoreland
[...More...]

"Port Authority Of Allegheny County" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

South Hills Village
South Hills Village is a two-level shopping mall located in the Pittsburgh suburbs of Bethel Park and Upper St. Clair. It was developed by the Oxford Development Co. as the first shopping complex in Greater Pittsburgh to be built as a fully enclosed structure. The two-level complex is currently owned by Simon Property Group, who acquired it in 1997. It is anchored by Target, Dick's Sporting Goods, Macy's (formerly Lazarus and Horne's) and Sears. The mall features over 130 specialty stores. The mall also houses a food court and several professional offices. South Hills Village was the largest in Greater Pittsburgh until the Monroeville Mall, also built by the Oxford Development Company, opened in 1969. Located across the street from Macy's is the South Hills Village light rail station
[...More...]

"South Hills Village" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Commuter Rail
Commuter rail, also called suburban rail, is a passenger rail transport service that primarily operates between a city centre and middle to outer suburbs beyond 15 km (10 miles) and commuter towns or other locations that draw large numbers of commuters—people who travel on a daily basis. Trains operate following a schedule at speeds varying from 50 to 200 km/h (30 to 125 mph). Distance charges or zone pricing may be used. Non-English names include Treno suburbano in Italian, Cercanías
Cercanías
in Spanish, Rodalies in Catalan, Proastiakos
Proastiakos
in Greek, S-Bahn
S-Bahn
in German (although Regionalbahn or stopping services occasionally also operate as commuter trains), Train de banlieue in French, Příměstský vlak or Esko in Czech, Elektrichka
Elektrichka
in Russian, Pociąg podmiejski in Polish and Pendeltåg in Swedish
[...More...]

"Commuter Rail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

GMC New Look
The GM New Look bus, also commonly known by the nickname "Fishbowl" (for its six-piece rounded windshield), is a transit bus introduced in 1959 by Truck and Coach Division of General Motors
General Motors
and produced until 1986.[2] More than 44,000 New Look buses were built. Its high production figures and long service career made it an iconic North American transit bus. The design is listed as U.S. Patent D182,998 by Roland E. Gegoux and William P. Strong.Contents1 Production overview 2 Description2.1 Variants based on the New Look3 Model naming3.1 First generation (1959–1962) 3.2 Second generation (1963–1967) 3.3 Third generation (1968–1971) 3.4 Fourth generation (1972–1977 USA; 1972–1986 Canada)4 Production figures by model4.1 Transit 4.2 Suburban5 See also 6 References6.1 Bibliography7 External linksProduction overview[edit] 44,484 New Look buses were built over the production lifespan, of which 33,413 were built in the U.S
[...More...]

"GMC New Look" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Urban Sprawl
Urban sprawl
Urban sprawl
or suburban sprawl describes the expansion of human populations away from central urban areas into low-density, monofunctional and usually car-dependent communities, in a process called suburbanization. In addition to describing a particular form of urbanization, the term also relates to the social and environmental consequences associated with this development. In Continental Europe the term "peri-urbanisation" is often used to denote similar dynamics and phenomena, although the term urban sprawl is currently being used by the European Environment Agency. There is widespread disagreement about what constitutes sprawl and how to quantify it. For example, some commentators measure sprawl only with the average number of residential units per acre in a given area
[...More...]

"Urban Sprawl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Philippine Army Air Corps
World War IIBattle of Bataan Philippines Campaign (1941-1942) Philippines Campaign (1944-1945)CommandersNotable commanders Maj. William L. Lee Maj. Basilio Fernando LCol. Charles A. Backes Capt. Pelagio Cruz (PAAC Inf. Bn.) LCol. John Ryan LCol. Edwin AndrewsWWII Philippine Army DivisionsPrevious Next102nd Division (PA) Philippine Army Offshore PatrolCeremony at Camp Murphy in Rizal marking the induction of the Philippine Army Air Corps into the U.S. Army on 15 August 1941. Behind Lt. Gen. Douglas MacArthur, from left to right, are Lt. Col. Richard K. Sutherland, Col. Harold H. George, Lt. Col. William F. Marquat, and Maj. LeGrande A. Diller.The Philippine Army Air Corps (Tagalog: Pulutong Himpapawid ng Hukbong Katihan ng Pilipinas; Spanish: Cuerpo Aéreo del Ejercito Filipino) was created in 1935 as the air component of the Philippine Army
[...More...]

"Philippine Army Air Corps" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rubber-tyred Metro
A rubber-tyred metro, also spelled rubber-tired metro, is a form of rapid transit system that uses a mix of road and rail technology. The vehicles have wheels with rubber tires that run on rolling pads inside guide bars for traction, as well as traditional railway steel wheels with deep flanges on steel tracks for guidance through conventional switches as well as guidance in case a tyre fails. Most rubber-tyred trains are purpose-built and designed for the system on which they operate
[...More...]

"Rubber-tyred Metro" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oakland (Pittsburgh)
Oakland is the academic and healthcare center of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
and one of the city's major cultural centers. The neighborhood is home to three universities, museums, and hospitals, as well as an abundance of shopping, restaurants, and recreational activities. Oakland is home to the Schenley Farms National Historic District which encompasses two city designated historic districts: the mostly residential Schenley Farms Historic District and the predominantly institutional Oakland Civic Center Historic District. It is also home to the locally designated Oakland Square Historic District. The Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh
Bureau of Fire has Fire Station No. 14 on McKee Place and Fire Station No
[...More...]

"Oakland (Pittsburgh)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Marketing
Marketing
Marketing
is the study and management of exchange relationships.[1][2] Marketing
Marketing
is used to create, keep and satisfy the customer
[...More...]

"Marketing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baltimore And Ohio Railroad
The Baltimore
Baltimore
and Ohio Railroad (reporting marks B&O, BO) is the oldest railroad in the United States and the first common carrier railroad, with its first section opening in 1830. It came into being mostly because the city of Baltimore
Baltimore
wanted to compete with the newly constructed Erie Canal
Erie Canal
(which served New York City) and another canal being proposed by Pennsylvania, which would have connected Philadelphia
Philadelphia
and Pittsburgh.[not verified in body] At first this railroad was located entirely in the state of Maryland, with an original line built from the port of Baltimore
Baltimore
west to Sandy Hook. At this point to continue westward, it had to cross into Virginia
Virginia
(now West Virginia) over the Potomac River, adjacent to the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah rivers
[...More...]

"Baltimore And Ohio Railroad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pennsylvania General Assembly
253 voting members50 senators 203 representativesHouse of Representatives political groups     Republican Party      Democratic PartyState Senate political groups     Republican Party      Democratic PartyElectionsHouse of Representatives last electionNovember 8, 2016State Senate last electionNovember 8, 2016Meeting place Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State CapitolWebsitewww.legis.state.pa.usThe Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. The legislature convenes in the State Capitol building in Harrisburg. In colonial times (1682–1776), the legislature was known as the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Provincial Assembly. Since the Constitution of 1776, written by American revolutionaries, the legislature has been known as the General Assembly
[...More...]

"Pennsylvania General Assembly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Carnegie, Pennsylvania
Carnegie (/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/)[3] is a borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, United States, and is part of the Pittsburgh Metro Area. The population was 7,972 in the 2010 census.Contents1 Geography 2 Surrounding communities 3 History 4 Culture 5 Government and Politics 6 Education 7 Demographics 8 Notable people8.1 Athletes 8.2 Politicians 8.3 Artists9 See also 10 Gallery 11 References 12 External linksGeography[edit] Carnegie is located at 40°24′25″N 80°5′12″W / 40.40694°N 80.08667°W / 40.40694; -80.08667. It is approximately 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Pittsburgh. Chartiers Creek runs through the center of the borough. According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 1.6 square miles (4.1 km2), all of it land
[...More...]

"Carnegie, Pennsylvania" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

1973 Oil Crisis
The 1973 oil crisis
1973 oil crisis
began in October 1973 when the members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries
Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries
proclaimed an oil embargo. The embargo was targeted at nations perceived as supporting Israel
Israel
during the Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur
War.[1] The initial nations targeted were Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the United States with the embargo also later extended to Portugal, Rhodesia
Rhodesia
and South Africa. By the end of the embargo in March 1974,[2] the price of oil had risen from US$3 per barrel to nearly $12 globally; US prices were significantly higher
[...More...]

"1973 Oil Crisis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Stagflation
In economics, stagflation, a portmanteau of stagnation and inflation, is a situation in which the inflation rate is high, the economic growth rate slows, and unemployment remains steadily high. It raises a dilemma for economic policy, since actions designed to lower inflation may exacerbate unemployment, and vice versa. The term is generally attributed to Iain Macleod, a British Conservative Party politician who became chancellor of the exchequer in 1970 and coined the phrase in his speech to Parliament in 1965.[1][2][3][4] John Maynard Keynes
John Maynard Keynes
did not use the term, but some of his work refers to the conditions that most would recognise as stagflation. In the version of Keynesian
Keynesian
macroeconomic theory that was dominant between the end of World War II and the late 1970s, inflation and recession were regarded as mutually exclusive, the relationship between the two being described by the Phillips curve
[...More...]

"Stagflation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strike Action
Strike action, also called labor strike, labour strike, or simply strike, is a work stoppage caused by the mass refusal of employees to work. A strike usually takes place in response to employee grievances. Strikes became common during the Industrial Revolution, when mass labor became important in factories and mines. In most countries, strike actions were quickly made illegal,[citation needed] as factory owners had far more power than workers. Most Western countries partially legalized striking in the late 19th or early 20th centuries. Strikes are sometimes used to pressure governments to change policies. Occasionally, strikes destabilize the rule of a particular political party or ruler; in such cases, strikes are often part of a broader social movement taking the form of a campaign of civil resistance. Notable examples are the 1980 Gdańsk Shipyard
Gdańsk Shipyard
or 1981 Warning Strike, led by Lech Wałęsa
[...More...]

"Strike Action" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.