HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
[...More...]

"Pope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Catholic Tradition
Sacred Tradition, or Holy Tradition, is a theological term used in some Christian traditions, primarily those claiming apostolic succession such as the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Assyrian, and Anglican traditions, to refer to the foundation of the doctrinal and spiritual authority of the Christian Church
Christian Church
and of the Bible. The word "tradition" is taken from the Latin
Latin
trado, tradere, meaning "to hand over, to deliver, to bequeath". The teachings of Jesus Christ and the holy Apostles are preserved in writing in the Scriptures
Scriptures
as well as word of mouth and are handed on. This perpetual handing on of the Tradition is called the Living Tradition; it is the faithful and constant transmission of the teachings of the Apostles from one generation to the next
[...More...]

"Catholic Tradition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brother (Catholic)
A religious brother is a member of a Christian religious institute or religious order who commits himself to following Christ in consecrated life of the Church, usually by the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. He is a layman, in the sense of not being ordained as a deacon or priest, and usually lives in a religious community and works in a ministry appropriate to his capabilities. A brother might practice any secular occupation. The term "brother" is used as he is expected to be as a brother to others. Brothers are members of a variety of religious communities, which may be contemplative, monastic, or apostolic in character
[...More...]

"Brother (Catholic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coarb
A coarb, from the Old Irish comarbae (Modern Irish comharba), meaning "heir" or "successor",[1] was a distinctive office of the later medieval church among the Gaels
Gaels
of Ireland and Scotland. In this period coarb appears interchangeable with "erenach", denoting the episcopally nominated lay guardian of a parish church and headman of the family in hereditary occupation of church lands. The coarb, however, often had charge of a church which had held comparatively high rank in pre‐Norman Ireland, or one still possessed of relatively extensive termon lands.[2] Also as per this article "..
[...More...]

"Coarb" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Suffragan Bishop
A suffragan bishop is a bishop subordinate to a metropolitan bishop or diocesan bishop. They may be assigned to an area which does not have a cathedral of its own.Contents1 Anglican
Anglican
Communion1.1 England1.1.1 History 1.1.2 Today1.1.2.1 Area bishops 1.1.2.2 Suffragan bishops1.2 Wales 1.3 Ireland 1.4 United States 1.5 Acting bishops2 Roman Catholic Church 3 See also 4 References Anglican
Anglican
Communion[edit] In the Anglican
Anglican
churches, the term applies to a bishop who is an assistant to a diocesan bishop
[...More...]

"Suffragan Bishop" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Definitor
A definitor is, in Latin, he who defines. In the Catholic Church, however, this is a title with different specific uses. There are secular definitors, who have a limited amount of oversight over a part of a diocese. There are also definitors in religious orders who generally provide counsel and assistance to the superiors general and provincial superiors of their order. Secular definitors[edit] In a deanery or vicarate forane, which is a grouping of several neighboring parishes within a diocese, a definitor is either the second (and unique) highest office, immediately below the dean or vicar forane and his deputy, or is the priest in charge of any of a number of even smaller districts within the deanery, called definitio. They oversee the ecclesiastical property and generally assist the dean, under the ordinary authority of the bishop. Alternative titles for this position are chamberlain or treasurer
[...More...]

"Definitor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chancellor (ecclesiastical)
Chancellor is an ecclesiastical title used by several quite distinct officials of some Christian churches.In some churches, the Chancellor of a diocese is a lawyer who represents the church in legal matters. In the Church of England, the Chancellor is the judge of the consistory court of the diocese
[...More...]

"Chancellor (ecclesiastical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moderator Of The Curia
A moderator of the curia, under the authority of the bishop of a diocese in the Catholic Church, coordinates the exercise of the administrative duties and oversees those who hold offices and minister in diocesan administration. He must be a priest. The office has been variously described[by whom?] as equivalent to a chief operating officer (COO). Although the office was first included in the 1983 Code of Canon Law,[citation needed] the concept is much older.[citation needed] The bishop is not required to appoint a moderator of the curia and may exercise the office himself or delegate its functions to others. Usually, the vicar general, or one of them, is appointed to this office.[1] The moderator of the curia is bound with the bishop to the general principle "that diocesan structures should always be at the service of the good of souls and that administrative demands should not take precedence over the care of persons
[...More...]

"Moderator Of The Curia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Diocesan Administrator
A diocesan administrator is a provisional ordinary of a Roman Catholic particular church.Contents1 Diocesan administrators in canon law 2 Administrators of prince-bishoprics 3 Protestant "elected bishops"3.1 Prince-bishoprics ruled by Protestant bishops4 References 5 External linksDiocesan administrators in canon law[edit] The college of consultors elects an administrator within eight days after the see is known to be vacant.[1] The college must elect as administrator a priest or bishop at least 35 years old.[2] If the college of consultors fails to elect a priest of the required minimum age within the time allotted, the choice of diocesan administrator passes to the metropolitan archbishop or, if the metropolitan see is vacant, to the senior by appointment of the suffragan bishops of the ecclesiastical province.[3] If a diocese has a coadjutor bishop, the coadjutor succeeds immediately to the episcopal see upon the previous bishop's death or resignat
[...More...]

"Diocesan Administrator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consecrator
Consecrator
Consecrator
is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
to designate a bishop who ordains a priest to the episcopal state. The term is also used in Eastern Rite Churches and in Anglican
Anglican
communities.Contents1 History 2 Validity 3 Co-Consecrators 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The church has always sought to assemble as many bishops as possible for the election and consecration of new bishops.[1] Although due to difficulties in travel, timing, and frequency of consecrations, this was reduced to the requirement that all comprovincial (of the same province) bishops participate
[...More...]

"Consecrator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chaplain
A chaplain is a cleric (such as a minister, priest, pastor, rabbi, or imam), or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel. Though originally the word chaplain referred to representatives of the Christian
Christian
faith,[1][2] it is now also applied to people of other religions or philosophical traditions–such as the case of chaplains serving with military forces and an increasing number of chaplaincies at American universities.[3] In recent times, many lay people hav
[...More...]

"Chaplain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Territorial Abbey
A territorial abbey (or territorial abbacy) is a particular church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
comprising defined territory which is not part of a diocese but surrounds an abbey or monastery whose abbot or superior functions as ordinary for all Catholics and parishes in the territory. Such an abbot is called a territorial abbot or abbot nullius diœceseos (abbreviated abbot nullius and Latin for "abbot of no diocese"). A territorial abbot thus differs from an ordinary abbot, who exercises authority only within the monastery's walls or to monks or canons who have taken their vows there
[...More...]

"Territorial Abbey" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ecclesiastical Judge
An ecclesiastical judge (Latin: Judex -, or Judex Ecclesiasticus) is an ecclesiastical person who possesses ecclesiastical jurisdiction either in general or in the strict sense. Up until 1858 when Ecclesiastical courts
Ecclesiastical courts
were abolished, ecclesiastical judges tried church clergy men in church courts or Ecclesiastical courts. Charges dealt in these courts were often very lenient, especially when dealt to church clergymen. Catholic canon law[edit]This article may be too long to read and navigate comfortably. Please consider splitting content into sub-articles, condensing it, or adding or removing subheadings
[...More...]

"Ecclesiastical Judge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consultor
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


[...More...]

"Consultor" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Defender Of The Bond
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


[...More...]

"Defender Of The Bond" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Auditor (ecclesiastical)
In ecclesiastical terminology, an Auditor (from a Latin word meaning "hearer") is a person given authority to hear cases in an ecclesiastical court.Contents1 Roman Catholic Church 2 Church of England 3 Church of Scientology 4 ReferencesRoman Catholic Church[edit]Part of a series on theHierarchy of the Catholic ChurchSaint PeterEcclesiastical titles (order of precedence)Pope CardinalCardinal VicarModerator of the curia Chaplain
Chaplain
of His Holiness Papal legate Papal majordomo Apostolic Nuncio Apostolic Delegate Apostolic Syndic Apostolic visitor Vicar Apostolic Apostolic
[...More...]

"Auditor (ecclesiastical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.