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Polyphaga
Bostrichiformia Cucujiformia Elateriformia Scarabaeiformia Staphyliniformia Polyphaga
Polyphaga
is the largest and most diverse suborder of beetles. It comprises 144 families in 16 superfamilies, and displays an enormous variety of specialization and adaptation, with over 300,000 described species, or approximately 90% of the beetle species so far discovered. Key characteristics of Polyphaga
Polyphaga
are that the hind coxa (base of the leg), does not divide the first and second abdominal/ventral plates which are known as sternites
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Polyphagia
Polyphagia or hyperphagia is excessive hunger or increased appetite.[1]Contents1 In medicine 2 Causes2.1 Diabetic ketoacidosis3 Etymology and pronunciation 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIn medicine[edit] In medicine, polyphagia (sometimes known as hyperphagia) is a medical sign meaning excessive hunger and abnormally large intake of solids by mouth
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Sternites
The sternum (pl. "sterna") is the ventral portion of a segment of an arthropod thorax or abdomen. In insects, the sterna are usually single, large sclerites, and external. However, they can sometimes be divided in two or more, in which case the subunits are called sternites,[1] and may also be modified on the terminal abdominal segments so as to form part of the functional genitalia, in which case they are frequently reduced in size and development, and may become internalized and/or membranous. For a detailed explanation of the terminology, see [2] Kinorhynchs have tergal and sternal plates too, though seemingly not homologous with those of arthropods.[3]Ventrites are externally visible sternites. Usually the first sternite is covered up, so that vertrite numbers do not correspond to sternid numbers. The term is also used in other arthropod groups such as crustaceans, arachnids and myriapods. Sternites on the pleon (abdomen) of a crustacean may be referred to as pleonsternites
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Spiracle
Spiracles (/ˈspɪrəkəl, ˈspaɪ-/[1][2]) are openings on the surface of some animals, which usually lead to respiratory systems. Vertebrates[edit] Spiracle
Spiracle
of a shark (bighead spurdog, Squalus bucephalus) Spiracle
Spiracle
of a bluespotted ribbontail ray, Taeniura lymmaThe spiracle is a small hole behind each eye that opens to the mouth in some fish. In the primitive jawless fish the first gill opening immediately behind the mouth is essentially similar to the other gill opening. With the evolution of the jaw in the early jawed vertebrates, this gill slit was "caught" between the forward gill-rod (now functioning as the jaw) and the next rod, the hyomandibular bone, supporting the jaw hinge and anchoring the jaw to the skull proper. The gill opening was closed off from below, the remaining opening was small and hole-like, and is termed a "spiracle"
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Rhabdom
The compound eyes of arthropods like insects, crustaceans and millipedes[1] are composed of units called ommatidia (singular: ommatidium). An ommatidium contains a cluster of photoreceptor cells surrounded by support cells and pigment cells. The outer part of the ommatidium is overlaid with a transparent cornea. Each ommatidium is innervated by one axon bundle (usually consisting of 6-9 axons, depending on the number of rhabdomeres)[2] and provides the brain with one picture element. The brain forms an image from these independent picture elements. The number of ommatidia in the eye depends upon the type of arthropod and may be as low as 5 as in the Antarctic isopod Glyptonotus antarcticus [3] or range from just a handful in the primitive Zygentoma to around 30 thousand in larger Anisoptera dragonflies as well as in some Sphingidae moths.[4] Ommatidia are typically hexagonal in cross section and approximately ten times longer than wide
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Ommatidium
The compound eyes of arthropods like insects, crustaceans and millipedes[1] are composed of units called ommatidia (singular: ommatidium). An ommatidium contains a cluster of photoreceptor cells surrounded by support cells and pigment cells. The outer part of the ommatidium is overlaid with a transparent cornea. Each ommatidium is innervated by one axon bundle (usually consisting of 6-9 axons, depending on the number of rhabdomeres)[2] and provides the brain with one picture element. The brain forms an image from these independent picture elements
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Malpighian Tubule
The Malpighian tubule system
Malpighian tubule system
is a type of excretory and osmoregulatory system found in some insects, myriapods, arachnids, and tardigrades. The system consists of branching tubules extending from the alimentary canal that absorbs solutes, water, and wastes from the surrounding hemolymph. The wastes then are released from the organism in the form of solid nitrogenous compounds and calcium oxalate. The system is named after Marcello Malpighi, a seventeenth-century anatomist. It is unclear as to whether the Malpighian tubules of arachnids and those of the Uniramia
Uniramia
are homologous or the result of convergent evolution.Contents1 Structure 2 General mode of action2.1 Alternative modes of action3 Other uses 4 See also 5 ReferencesStructure[edit]Malpighian tubules of a dissected cockroach, indicated by yellow arrow
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Phytophagous
A herbivore is an animal anatomically and physiologically adapted to eating plant material, for example foliage, for the main component of its diet. As a result of their plant diet, herbivorous animals typically have mouthparts adapted to rasping or grinding
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Cetonia Aurata
Cetonia
Cetonia
aurata, called the rose chafer or the green rose chafer, is a beetle, 20 mm (¾ in) long, that has a metallic structurally coloured green and a distinct V-shaped scutellum. The scutellum is the small V-shaped area between the wing cases; it may show several small, irregular, white lines and marks
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Furniture Beetle
The common furniture beetle or common house borer (Anobium punctatum) is a woodboring beetle. In the larval stage it bores in wood and feeds upon it. Adult Anobium punctatum measure 2.7–4.5 millimetres (0.11–0.18 in) in length. They have brown ellipsodial bodies with a prothorax resembling a monk's cowl .[1]Contents1 Life cycle 2 Pest control 3 See also 4 ReferencesLife cycle[edit] Adults do not feed; they just reproduce. The female lays her eggs into cracks in wood or inside old exit holes, if available. The eggs hatch after some three weeks, each producing a 1 millimetre (0.039 in) long, creamy white, C-shaped larva. For three to four years the larvae bore semi-randomly through timber, following and eating the starchy part of the wood grain, and grow up to 7 millimetres (0.28 in). They come nearer to the wood surface when ready to pupate. They excavate small spaces just under the wood surface and take up to eight weeks to pupate
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Notopleuron
The notopleuron (plural notopleura) is a region on an insect thorax. Notopleura are useful in characterizing species, particularly, though not uniquely, in the Order Diptera (the "true flies"). The notopleuron is a thoracic pleurite (a sclerite on the pleuron) situated at the end of the transverse suture of Diptera. Apart from in the Diptera, visible notopleural structures occur in the beetle suborder Adephaga and in certain Hemiptera, but this list is not exhaustive. References[edit]Zombori, L. & Henrik Steinmann (1999) Dictionary of Insect Morphology. Walter de Gruyter. ISBN 3-11-014898-6This insect anatomy-related article is a stub
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Wikispecies
Wikispecies
Wikispecies
is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation. Its aim is to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species; the project is directed at scientists, rather than at the general public
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Arthropod Coxa
The arthropod leg is a form of jointed appendage of arthropods, usually used for walking. Many of the terms used for arthropod leg segments (called podomeres) are of Latin
Latin
origin, and may be confused with terms for bones: coxa (meaning hip, plural coxae), trochanter (compare trochanter), femur (plural femora), tibia (plural tibiae), tarsus (plural tarsi), ischium (plural ischia), metatarsus, carpus, dactylus (meaning finger), patella (plural patellae). Homologies of leg segments between groups are difficult to prove and are the source of much argument. Some authors posit up to eleven segments per leg for the most recent common ancestor of extant arthropods[1] but modern arthropods have eight or fewer
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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