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Polymath
A polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much,"[1] Latin: homo universalis, "universal man"[citation needed]) is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas—such a person is known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. In Western Europe, the first work to use polymathy in its title (De Polymathia tractatio: integri operis de studiis veterum) was published in 1603 by Johann von Wower, a Hamburg philosopher.[2][3][4][5] Wower defined polymathy as "knowledge of various matters, drawn from all kinds of studies [...] ranging freely through all the fields of the disciplines, as far as the human mind, with unwearied industry, is able to pursue them".[3] Wower lists erudition, literature, philology, philomathy and polyhistory as synonyms
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History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Poetry
Poetry
Poetry
(the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic[1][2][3] qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning. Poetry
Poetry
has a long history, dating back to the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh. Early poems evolved from folk songs such as the Chinese Shijing, or from a need to retell oral epics, as with the Sanskrit Vedas, Zoroastrian Gathas, and the Homeric epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey. Ancient attempts to define poetry, such as Aristotle's Poetics, focused on the uses of speech in rhetoric, drama, song and comedy
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Ideal (ethics)
An ideal is a principle or value that one actively pursues as a goal, usually in the context of ethics, and one's prioritization of ideals can serve to indicate the extent of one's dedication to each. For example, someone who espouses the ideal of honesty, but is willing to lie to protect a friend, demonstrates not only devotion to friendship, but also belief in its supersedence of honesty in importance.Contents1 In applied ethics 2 In politics 3 Idols and heroes 4 Ideal and virtue 5 Relative ideal 6 See also 7 Sources 8 External linksIn applied ethics[edit] In some theories of applied ethics, such as that of Rushworth Kidder, there is importance given to such orders as a way to resolve disputes. In law, for instance, a judge is sometimes called on to resolve the balance between the ideal of truth, which would advise hearing out all evidence, and the ideal of fairness. In politics[edit] In politics ideals play a pivotal role
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University
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Scivias
Scivias
Scivias
is an illustrated work by Hildegard von Bingen, completed in 1151 or 1152, describing 26 religious visions she experienced. It is the first of three works that she wrote describing her visions, the others being Liber vitae meritorum and De operatione Dei (also known as Liber divinorum operum). The title comes from the Latin
Latin
phrase "Sci vias Domini" ("Know the Ways of the Lord").[1] The book is illustrated by 35 miniature illustrations, more than that are included in her two later books of visions.[1] The work is divided into three parts, reflecting the Trinity.[2] The first and second parts are approximately equal in length, while the third is as long as the other two together.[3] The first part includes a preface describing how she was commanded to write the work, and includes six visions dealing with themes of creation and the Fall
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Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
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Eratosthenes
Sieve of Eratosthenes Foundation of Geography Eratosthenes
Eratosthenes
of Cyrene (/ɛrəˈtɒsθəniːz/; Greek: Ἐρατοσθένης ὁ Κυρηναῖος, IPA: [eratostʰénɛːs]; c. 276 BC[1] – c. 195/194 BC[2]) was a Greek mathematician, geographer, poet, astronomer, and music theorist. He was a man of learning, becoming the chief librarian at the Library of Alexandria. He invented the discipline of geography, including the terminology used today.[3] He is best known for being the first person to calculate the circumference of the Earth, which he did by comparing altitudes of the mid-day sun at two places a known North-South distance apart. His calculation was remarkably accurate. He was also the first to calculate the tilt of the Earth's axis (again with remarkable accuracy)
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Encyclopedia
An encyclopedia or encyclopaedia is a reference work or compendium providing summaries of information from either all branches of knowledge or from a particular field or discipline.[1] Encyclopedias are divided into articles or entries that are often arranged alphabetically by article name[2] and sometimes by thematic categories
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Benjamin Howard Baker
Benjamin Howard Baker[1] (13 February 1892 – 10 September 1987) was an English athlete who excelled in a wide range of sports, mostly in association football and high jump.[2][3] In team sports, Baker was goalkeeper for England, Chelsea,[4] Everton and Oldham Athletic football clubs, having previously played for the renowned amateur team, the Corinthians
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Courtier
A courtier (/ˈkɔːrtiə/; French: [kuʁtje]) is a person who is often in attendance at the court of a monarch or other royal personage.[1] The earliest historical examples of courtiers were part of the retinues of rulers. Historically the court was the centre of government as well as the residence of the monarch, and the social and political life were often completely mixed together.Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Examples of courtiers 4 In literature 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit]Portrait of a Persian courtierMadame de PompadourMonarchs very often expected the more important nobles to spend much of the year in attendance on them at court. Not all courtiers were noble, as they included clergy, soldiers, clerks, secretaries, agents and middlemen with business at court. All those who held a court appointment could be called courtiers but not all courtiers held positions at court
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Creative Class
The creative class is a posited socioeconomic class identified by American economist and social scientist Richard Florida, a professor and head of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto. According to Florida, the creative class are a key driving force for economic development of post-industrial cities in the United States.Contents1 Overview 2 Background 3 Occupations 4 The global economy 5 Places of high creative class populations 6 Lifestyle 7 Criticisms7.1 Statistical indices and composition 7.2 Economic growth 7.3 Grassroots resistance8 See also 9 References9.1 Notes 9.2 Cited works 9.3 Further reading 9.4 Web references10 External linksOverview[edit] Florida describes the creative class as comprising 40 million workers (about 30 percent of the U.S. workforce)
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The Voyage Of The Space Beagle
The Voyage of the Space Beagle (1950) is a science fiction novel by A. E. van Vogt in the space opera subgenre. The novel is a "fix-up" compilation of four previously published SF stories:"Black Destroyer" (cover story of the July, 1939, issue of Astounding magazine—the first published SF by A. E. van Vogt) (chapters 1 to 6) "War of Nerves" (May, 1950, Other Worlds magazine) (chapters 9 to 12) "Discord in Scarlet" (cover story of the December, 1939, issue of Astounding magazine—the second published SF by A. E
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Opsimath
An opsimath is a person who begins, or continues, to study or learn late in life.[1] The word is derived from the Greek ὀψέ (opsé), meaning 'late', and μανθάνω (manthánō), meaning 'learn'.[2] Opsimathy was once frowned upon, used as a put-down with implications of laziness,[3] and considered less effective by educators than early learning.[4] The emergence of "opsimath clubs"[5] has demonstrated that opsimathy has shed much of this negative connotation,[6] and that this approach may, in fact, be desirable. Notable opsimaths include 19th century army officer and Orientalist Sir Henry Rawlinson, Grandma Moses, mathematician Paul Erdős (who published papers until his death at age 83), Rabbi Akiva (according to the Talmud he began studying at age 40), and Cato the Elder, who learned Greek only at the age of 80. References[edit]^ The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, page 2010
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Polygraph (author)
A polygraph (from Ancient Greek: πολύς, poly = "many" and γράφειν, graphein = "to write") is an author who writes in a variety of fields.[1] In literature, the term polygraph is often applied to certain writers of antiquity such as Aristotle, Plutarch, Varro, Cicero and Pliny the Elder. Polygraphs still existed in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, but, other than writers of books for children, they have become rarer in modern times due to the specialisation of knowledge
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