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Politics Of The Philippines
Elections are administered by an independent Commission on Elections every three years starting 1992. Held every second Monday of May, the winners in the elections take office on the following June 30. Local government is produced by local government units from the provinces, cities, municipalities and barangays. While the most regions do not have political power, and exist merely for administration purposes, autonomous regions have expanded powers more than the other local government units. While local government units enjoy autonomy, much of their budget is derived from allocations from the national government, putting their true autonomy in doubt
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Money Bill
In the Westminster system
Westminster system
(and, colloquially, in the United States), a money bill or supply bill is a bill that solely concerns taxation or government spending (also known as appropriation of money), as opposed to changes in public law.Contents1 Conventions 2 Requirements in Westminster systems2.1 Australia 2.2 Bangladesh 2.3 India 2.4 Republic of Ireland 2.5 United Kingdom3 Requirements in non-Westminster systems3.1 United States4 See also 5 ReferencesConventions[edit] It is often a constitutional convention that the upper house may not block a money bill. There is often another requirement that non-money bill-type clauses may not be attached to a money bill. The rationale behind this convention is that the upper house, being appointed or indirectly elected, should not have any right to decide on taxation and public expenditure-related policies as may be framed by the directly elected representatives of the lower house
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Manila
Manila
Manila
(/məˈnɪlə/; Filipino: Maynilà, pronounced [majˈnilaʔ] or [majniˈla]), officially the City of Manila
Manila
(Filipino: Lungsod ng Maynilà [luŋˈsod nɐŋ majˈnilaʔ], Spanish: Ciudad de Manila), is the capital of the Philippines
Philippines
and the most densely populated city proper in the world.[3] It was the first chartered City by virtue of the Philippine Commission Act 183 on July 31, 1901 and gained autonomy with the passage of Republic Act No
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Majority Vote
A majority is the greater part, or more than half, of the total. It is a subset of a set consisting of more than half of the set's elements. "Majority" can be used to specify the voting requirement, as in a "majority vote". A majority vote is more than half of the votes cast. A majority can be compared to a plurality, which is a subset larger than any other subset considered. A plurality is not necessarily a majority as the largest subset considered may consist of less than half the set's elements. This can occur when there are three or more possible choices. In British English the term majority is also alternatively used to refer to the winning margin, i.e
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Adjournment Sine Die
Adjournment sine die (from the Latin
Latin
"without day") means "without assigning a day for a further meeting or hearing".[1] To adjourn an assembly sine die is to adjourn it for an indefinite period
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Veto
A veto – Latin for "I forbid" – is the power (used by an officer of the state, for example) to unilaterally stop an official action, especially the enactment of legislation. A veto can be absolute, as for instance in the United Nations Security Council, whose permanent members (China, France, Russia, United Kingdom, and the United States of America) can block any resolution, or it can be limited, as in the legislative process of the United States, where a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate may override a Presidential veto of legislation.[1] A veto may give power only to stop changes (thus allowing its holder to protect the status quo), like the US legislative veto mentioned before, or to also adopt them (an "amendatory veto"), like the legislative veto of the Indian President, which allows him to propose amendments to bills returned to the Parliament for reconsideration. The concept of a veto body originated with the Roman consuls and tribunes
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Bill (proposed Law)
A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature.[1] A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature, or a statute.Contents1 Usage 2 Preparation 3 Introduction 4 Legislative stages 5 Enactment and after5.1 Approval 5.2 Afterwards6 Numbering of bills 7 See also 8 References 9 External links9.1 Hong Kong 9.2 India 9.3 Ireland 9.4 New Zealand 9.5 United Kingdom 9.6 United StatesUsage[edit] The term bill is primarily used in Anglophone nations
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National Unity Party (Philippines)
National
National
may refer to: Nation or country Nationality
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Lower House
A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.[1] Despite its official position "below" the upper house, in many legislatures worldwide, the lower house has come to wield more power. The lower house typically is the more numerous of the two chambers
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At-large
At-large is a designation for members of a governing body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body (for example, a city, state or province, nation, club or association), rather than a subset of that membership. At-large voting is in contrast to voting by electoral districts. If an at-large election is called to choose a single candidate, a single-winner voting system must necessarily be used
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Plurality-at-large Voting
Plurality-at-large voting, also known as block vote or multiple non-transferable vote (MNTV),[1] is a non-proportional voting system for electing several representatives from a single multimember electoral district using a series of check boxes and tallying votes similar to a plurality election. Multiple winners are elected simultaneously to serve the district. Block voting is not a system for obtaining proportional representation; instead the usual result is that where the candidates divide into definitive parties (especially for example where those parties have party lines which are whipped) the most popular party in the district sees its full slate of candidates elected, resulting in a landslide. The term "voting/plurality at-large" is in common usage in elections for representative members of a body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body
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Upper House
An upper house, sometimes called a senate, is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature (or one of three chambers of a tricameral legislature), the other chamber being the lower house.[1] The house formally designated as the upper house is usually smaller and often has more restricted power than the lower house
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Bicameral
A bicameral legislature divides the legislators into two separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. Bicameralism
Bicameralism
is distinguished from unicameralism, in which all members deliberate and vote as a single group, and from some legislatures that have three or more separate assemblies, chambers, or houses. As of 2015, fewer than half the world's national legislatures are bicameral.[1] Often, the members of the two chambers are elected or selected by different methods, which vary from country to country. This can often lead to the two chambers having very different compositions of members. Enactment of primary legislation often requires a concurrent majority – the approval of a majority of members in each of the chambers of the legislature. When this is the case, the legislature may be called an example of perfect bicameralism
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Government Service Insurance System
The Government Service Insurance System
Government Service Insurance System
(Filipino: Paseguruhan ng mga Naglilingkod sa Pamahalaan, abbreviated as GSIS) is a government-owned and controlled corporation (GOCC) of the Philippines. Created by Commonwealth Act No. 186 passed on November 14, 1936, the GSIS is mandated to provide and administer the following social security benefits for government employees: compulsory life insurance, optional life insurance, retirement benefits, disability benefits for work-related contingencies and death benefits. In addition, the GSIS is entrusted with the administration of the General Insurance Fund by virtue of RA656 of the Property Insurance Law. It provides insurance coverage to assets and properties which have government insurable interests. It is not possible for non-government employees, self-employed or non-working persons to become members of the GSIS
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Economist Intelligence Unit
The Economist
The Economist
Intelligence Unit (EIU) is a British business within the Economist Group
Economist Group
providing forecasting and advisory services through research and analysis, such as monthly country reports, five-year country economic forecasts, country risk service reports, and industry reports.[1] The EIU provides country, industry, and management analysis worldwide and incorporates the former Business International Corporation, a UK company acquired by its parent company in 1986
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Dominant-party System
A dominant-party system or one-party dominant system is a system where there is "a category of parties/political organisations that have successively won election victories and whose future defeat cannot be envisaged or is unlikely for the foreseeable future".[1] Many are de facto one-party systems, and often devolve into de jure one-party systems
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