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Points Of The Compass
The points of the compass mark the divisions on a compass, which is primarily divided into four points: north, south, east, and west. These cardinal directions are further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal winds. In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between cardinal and ordinal points, such as north-northeast (NNE) are added to give the 16 points of a wind compass.[1]32-point compass roseAt the most complete division are the full thirty-two points of the mariner's compass,[2] which adds points such as north by east (NbE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN) between north-northeast and northeast
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Compass Point (other)
Compass Point
Compass Point
may refer to:Cardinal direction, north, south, east or west Compass point, a direction on a traditional compass Compass Point
Compass Point
(David Allan Coe album)
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Portolan Chart
Portolan or portulan charts are navigational maps based on compass directions and estimated distances observed by the pilots at sea. They were first made in the 13th century in Italy, and later in Spain
Spain
and Portugal, with later 15th and 16th century charts noted for their cartographic accuracy.[1] With the advent of widespread competition among seagoing nations during the Age of Discovery, Portugal
Portugal
and Spain considered such maps to be state secrets. The English and Dutch, relative newcomers, found the description of Atlantic and Indian coastlines extremely valuable for their raiding, and later trading, ships
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Ligurian Language (Romance)
Ligurian (ligure or lengua ligure) is a Gallo-Italic language spoken in Liguria
Liguria
in Northern Italy, parts of the Mediterranean coastal zone of France, Monaco
Monaco
and in the villages of Carloforte
Carloforte
and Calasetta
Calasetta
in Sardinia. It is part of the Gallo-Italic and Western Romance
Western Romance
dialect continuum
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Southeastern (train Operating Company)
London & South Eastern Railway Limited,[5] trading as Southeastern, is a British train operating company owned by the Anglo-French joint venture Govia
Govia
that provides rail services in South East England. It is the key operator for commuter and regional services in South East London and Kent
Kent
but also serves parts of East Sussex. Southeastern trains operate along three main routes: the Southeastern Main Line
Southeastern Main Line
from London Cannon Street
London Cannon Street
and London Charing Cross to Dover
Dover
via Sevenoaks; the Chatham Main Line
Chatham Main Line
between London Victoria and Dover/ Ramsgate
Ramsgate
via the Medway
Medway
towns; and High Speed 1 from London St
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Sicilian Language
51-AAA-re & -rf (mainland 51-AAA-rc & -rd)This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
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Provençal Dialect
Provençal /prɒvɒnˈsæl/[3] (Occitan: Provençau or Prouvençau [pʀuveⁿˈsaw]) is a variety of Occitan
Occitan
spoken by a minority of people in southern France, mostly in Provence. In the English-speaking world, the term Provençal has historically also been used to refer to all of Occitan, but is now mainly understood to refer to the variety spoken in Provence.[4][5] Provençal is also the customary name given to the older version of the Occitan language
Occitan language
used by the troubadours of medieval literature, while Old French
Old French
or the langue d'oïl was limited to the northern areas of France
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Catalan Language
Catalan (/ˈkætəlæn, -ən, ˌkætəˈlæn/;[4] autonym: català [kətəˈla] or [kataˈla]) is a Western Romance
Western Romance
language derived from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
and named after the medieval Principality of Catalonia, in northeastern modern Spain. It is the only official language of Andorra,[5] and a co-official language of the Spanish autonomous communities of Catalonia, the Balearic Islands
Balearic Islands
and Valencia (where the language is known as Valencian). It also has semi-official status in the Italian commune of Alghero.[6] These territories are often called Catalan Countries. Catalan evolved from Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in the Middle Ages around the eastern Pyrenees
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Arabic
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Bora (wind)
The bora[1][2] (Croatian: bura, Montenegrin: bura/бура, Bulgarian and Russian: бора, Greek: μπόρα, Slovene: burja, Italian, Polish and Turkish as well as Venetian: bòra) is a northern to north-eastern katabatic wind in the Adriatic
Adriatic
Sea. Similar nomenclature is used for north-eastern winds in other littoral areas of eastern Mediterranean
Mediterranean
and Black Sea
Black Sea
basins. The same root is found in the name of the Greek mythological figure of Boreas/Βορέας, the North Wind
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Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
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Bearing (navigation)
In navigation bearing may refer, depending on the context, to any of: (A) the direction or course of motion itself[citation needed]; (B) the direction of a distant object relative to the current course (or the "change" in course that would be needed to get to that distant object); or (C), the angle away from North of a distant point as observed at the current point.[citation needed] Absolute bearing
Absolute bearing
refers to the angle between the magnetic North (magnetic bearing) or true North (true bearing) and an object. For example, an object to the East would have an absolute bearing of 90 degrees. Relative bearing refers to the angle between the craft's forward direction, and the location of another object
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Navigation
Navigation
Navigation
is a field of study that focuses on the process of monitoring and controlling the movement of a craft or vehicle from one place to another.[1] The field of navigation includes four general categories: land navigation, marine navigation, aeronautic navigation, and space navigation.[2] It is also the term of art used for the specialized knowledge used by navigators to perform navigation tasks
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TVMDC
TVMDC is a method for converting true, magnetic and compass headings. TVMDC is expressed as: True, variation, magnetic, deviation, compass. The most common use of the TVMDC method is correcting courses during nautical navigation.Contents1 Background 2 Determine variation in North America 3 Determine deviation 4 Formula4.1 Examples 4.2 Reverse5 ReferencesBackground[edit] The Geographic North Pole and the Magnetic North Pole
Magnetic North Pole
are not exactly the same position on the earth. From any position on the globe, a direction can be determined to either the geographic north pole or to the magnetic north pole. These directions are expressed in degrees from 0-360, and also fractions of a degree. The difference between these two directions is known as magnetic variation
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Wind Rose
A wind rose is a graphic tool used by meteorologists to give a succinct view of how wind speed and direction are typically distributed at a particular location. Historically, wind roses were predecessors of the compass rose (found on charts), as there was no differentiation between a cardinal direction and the wind which blew from such a direction. Using a polar coordinate system of gridding, the frequency of winds over a time period is plotted by wind direction, with color bands showing wind speed ranges. The direction of the longest spoke shows the wind direction with the greatest frequency.Contents1 History 2 Use 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit]A medieval wind roseBefore the development of the compass rose, a wind rose was included on maps in order to let the reader know which directions the 8 major winds (and sometimes 8 half winds and 16 quarter winds) blew within the plan view
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