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Point Defiance Zoo
The Point Defiance Zoo
Zoo
& Aquarium
Aquarium
(PDZA) is a combined zoo and aquarium located in Tacoma, Washington, US, owned by Metro Parks Tacoma. Situated on 29 acres (12 ha) in Tacoma's Point Defiance Park, the zoo and aquarium are home to over 9,000 specimens representing 367 animal species. The zoo was founded in 1905; the aquarium was founded in 1935 near Commencement Bay
Commencement Bay
and relocated within the zoo in 1963.[1] Both are accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.[4]Contents1 History 2 Exhibits 3 Beluga whales 4 Conservation 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Zoo
Zoo
was founded in 1905, and moved closer to its current location in 1914
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Rat
64 speciesSynonymsStenomys Thomas, 1910Rats are various medium-sized, long-tailed rodents of the superfamily Muroidea. "True rats" are members of the genus Rattus, the most important of which to humans are the black rat, Rattus rattus, and the brown rat, Rattus norvegicus. Many members of other rodent genera and families are also referred to as rats, and share many characteristics with true rats. Rats are typically distinguished from mice by their size. Generally, when someone discovers a large muroid rodent, its common name includes the term rat, while if it is smaller, the name includes the term mouse. The muroid family is broad and complex, and the common terms rat and mouse are not taxonomically specific
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Blacktip Reef Sharks
Carcharias elegans Ehrenberg, 1871 Carcharias marianensis Engelhardt, 1912 Carcharias melanopterus Quoy & Gaimard, 1824 Carcharias playfairii Günther, 1870 Squalus carcharias minor Forsskål, 1775 Squalus commersonii* Blainville, 1816 Squalus ustus* Duméril, 1824* ambiguous synonymThe blacktip reef shark ( Carcharhinus
Carcharhinus
melanopterus) is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, easily identified by the prominent black tips on its fins (especially on the first dorsal fin and its caudal fin). Among the most abundant sharks inhabiting the tropical coral reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, this species prefers shallow, inshore waters. Its exposed first dorsal fin is a common sight in the region. Most blacktip reef sharks are found over reef ledges and sandy flats, though they have also been known to enter brackish and freshwater environments
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Tufted Puffin
     extant (resident)     extant (breeding visitor)      extant (winter visitor)SynonymsAlca cirrhata Pallas, 1769 Lunda cirrhata (Pallas, 1769) Sagmatorrhina lathami Bonaparte, 1851The tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata), also known as crested puffin, is a relatively abundant medium-sized pelagic seabird in the auk family (Alcidae) found throughout the North Pacific Ocean
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Beluga Whale
The beluga whale or white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) is an Arctic and sub-Arctic cetacean. It is one of two members of the family Monodontidae, along with the narwhal, and the only member of the genus Delphinapterus. This marine mammal is commonly referred to as the beluga, melonhead, or sea canary due to its high-pitched twitter. It is adapted to life in the Arctic, so has anatomical and physiological characteristics that differentiate it from other cetaceans. Amongst these are its all-white colour and the absence of a dorsal fin. It possesses a distinctive protuberance at the front of its head which houses an echolocation organ called the melon, which in this species is large and deformable. The beluga's body size is between that of a dolphin's and a true whale's, with males growing up to 5.5 m (18 ft) long and weighing up to 1,600 kg (3,530 lb). This whale has a stocky body. A large percentage of its weight is blubber, as is true of many cetaceans
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Muskox
Generic:Bosovis Kowarzik, 1911[3]Specific: Bos
Bos
moschatus Zimmermann, 1780[4] Bosovis moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780) Kowarzik, 1911The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also spelled musk ox and musk-ox (in Inuktitut: ᐅᒥᖕᒪᒃ, umingmak), is an Arctic
Arctic
hoofed mammal of the family Bovidae,[6] noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor emitted during the seasonal rut by males, from which its name derives. This musky odor is used to attract females during mating season
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Reindeer
Cervus
Cervus
tarandus (Linnaeus, 1758)The reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), also known as the caribou in North America,[3] is a species of deer with circumpolar distribution, native to Arctic, sub-Arctic, tundra, boreal and mountainous regions of northern Europe, Siberia
Siberia
and North America.[2] This includes both sedentary and migratory populations. Rangifer herd size varies greatly in different geographic regions. The Taimyr herd of migrating Siberian tundra reindeer (R. t. sibiricus) in Russia
Russia
is the largest wild reindeer herd in the world,[4][5] with numbers varying between 400,000 and 1,000,000. What was once the second largest herd is the migratory boreal woodland caribou (R. t. caribou) George River herd in Canada, with former variations between 28,000 and 385,000
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Polar Bear
Ursus eogroenlandicus Ursus groenlandicus Ursus jenaensis Ursus labradorensis Ursus marinus Ursus polaris Ursus spitzbergensis Ursus ungavensis Thalarctos maritimusThe polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a carnivorous bear whose native range lies largely within the Arctic
Arctic
Circle, encompassing the Arctic Ocean, its surrounding seas and surrounding land masses. It is a large bear, approximately the same size as the omnivorous Kodiak bear
Kodiak bear
(Ursus arctos middendorffi).[3] A boar (adult male) weighs around 350–700 kg (772–1,543 lb),[4] while a sow (adult female) is about half that size
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Arctic Fox
The Arctic
Arctic
fox ( Vulpes
Vulpes
lagopus), also known as the white fox, polar fox, or snow fox, is a small fox native to the Arctic
Arctic
regions of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and common throughout the Arctic
Arctic
tundra biome.[1][7] It is well adapted to living in cold environments, and is best known for its thick, warm fur that is also used as camouflage. On average, Arctic
Arctic
foxes only live 3–4 years in the wild.[8] Its body length ranges from 46 to 68 cm (18 to 27 in), with a generally rounded body shape to minimize the escape of body heat. The Arctic
Arctic
fox preys on many small creatures such as lemmings, voles, ringed seal pups, fish, waterfowl, and seabirds. It also eats carrion, berries, seaweed, and insects and other small invertebrates
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Bay Pipefish
The bay pipefish ( Syngnathus
Syngnathus
leptorhyncus) is a pipefish native to the eelgrass beds of the Eastern Pacific
Eastern Pacific
(Southern Baja California
Baja California
to Gulf of Alaska),[1] where its sinuous shape and green color allow it to blend in with the waving blades of eelgrass. Like other members of the seahorse family, male pipefish tend the eggs laid by their female partners in specialized pouches.[2][3] References[edit]^ a b " Syngnathus
Syngnathus
leptorhynchus, Bay pipefish : aquarium." Web. 10 Dec 2009. http://www.fishbase.org/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=3303 ^ "Splendor in the Grass — Bay Nature Institute." Web. 10 Dec 2009. http://baynature.org/articles/apr-jun-2009/splendor-in-the-grass ^ Lamb, A, and Edgell, P. 2010. Coastal Fishes of the Pacific Northwest
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Enteroctopus Dofleini
Enteroctopus
Enteroctopus
dofleini, also known as the giant Pacific octopus or North Pacific
North Pacific
giant octopus, is a large marine cephalopod belonging to the genus Enteroctopus. Its spatial distribution includes the coastal North Pacific, along California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, Alaska, Russia, northern Japan, and Korea.[1] It can be found from the intertidal zone down to 2,000 m (6,600 ft), and is best adapted to cold, oxygen-rich water
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Nurse Sharks
Ginglymostoma Nebrius PseudoginglymostomaThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)The Ginglymostomatidae
Ginglymostomatidae
are a cosmopolitan family of carpet sharks, containing two monotypic genera of nurse sharks.[4] Common in shallow, tropical and subtropical waters, these sharks are sluggish and docile bottom-dwellers.[5] Nurse sharks typically attack humans only if directly threatened. The name nurse shark is thought to be a corruption of nusse, a name which once referred to the catsharks of the family Scyliorhinidae
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Pygmy Goat
The African pygmy goat is a breed of miniature domestic goat. The pygmy goat is quite a hardy animal, and can adapt to virtually all climates.[1]Contents1 Appearance 2 Reproduction 3 Kidding 4 Origin 5 General information 6 References 7 External linksAppearance[edit]Agouti Pygmy Kid being bottle fedNannies weigh 24 to 34 kg (53 to 75 lb), while billies weigh 27 to 39 kg (60 to 86 lb). Wither height ranges from 41 to 58 cm (16 to 23 in). In the U.S., pygmies come only in seven breed standard approved colors, and can be categorized into caramel patterned, agouti patterned, and black patterned. Within these categories, there are caramel with black markings, caramel with brown markings, brown agouti, grey agouti, black agouti, black with white markings, and solid black. The faulting matrix allows for faulting random white markings from moderate to very serious, and these animals will be judged accordingly
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Sea Otter
The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a marine mammal native to the coasts of the northern and eastern North Pacific Ocean. Adult sea otters typically weigh between 14 and 45 kg (31 and 99 lb), making them the heaviest members of the weasel family, but among the smallest marine mammals. Unlike most marine mammals, the sea otter's primary form of insulation is an exceptionally thick coat of fur, the densest in the animal kingdom. Although it can walk on land, the sea otter is capable of living exclusively in the ocean. The sea otter inhabits nearshore environments, where it dives to the sea floor to forage. It preys mostly on marine invertebrates such as sea urchins, various molluscs and crustaceans, and some species of fish. Its foraging and eating habits are noteworthy in several respects. First, its use of rocks to dislodge prey and to open shells makes it one of the few mammal species to use tools
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Black-breasted Hill Turtle
The black-breasted leaf turtle (Geoemyda spengleri ), also commonly called the Vietnamese leaf turtle or the black-breasted hill turtle, is a species of turtle in the family Geoemydidae (formerly called Bataguridae). The species is endemic to Southeast Asia.Contents1 Geographic range 2 Etymology 3 Domestic pet 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksGeographic range[edit] G. spengleri found in China and Vietnam,[1] and it has been recently discovered in Laos, too.[3] Etymology[edit] The specific name, spengleri, is in honor of Danish naturalist Lorenz Spengler.[4] Domestic pet[edit] G. spengleri is sometimes kept as a pet. This species of turtle has a pronounced hook on its upper jaw, which it uses in climbing. Pet owners of this turtle should take care not to trim the hook.[5] References[edit]^ a b Asian Turtle Trade Working Group (2000). "Geoemyda spengleri". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2000: e.T39552A97362363
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Gopher Snake
Arizona, Churchilla, Coluber, Elaphis, Epiglottophis, Pityophis, Rhinechis, Spilotes[1] Pituophis
Pituophis
is a genus of nonvenomous colubrid snakes commonly referred to as gopher snakes, pine snakes, and bull snakes, which are endemic to North America.Contents1 Geographic range 2 Description 3 Modified epiglottis 4 Species 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksGeographic range[edit] Species
Species
and subspecies within the genus Pituophis
Pituophis
are found throughout Mexico, the Southern and Western United States, and Western Canada.[2] Description[edit] All species of Pituophis
Pituophis
are large and powerfully built. The head is relatively small in proportion to the body, and it is only slightly distinct from the neck. The rostral is enlarged and elongated, imparting a characteristic somewhat pointed shape to the head
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