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Plympton-Wyoming
Plympton–Wyoming
Plympton–Wyoming
is a town in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in Lambton County
Lambton County
immediately east of Sarnia. It is the seat of the Lambton County
Lambton County
Council.[2] The town was created in 2001, amalgamating the Township of Plympton with the formerly independent Village of Wyoming. The town's first mayor was Patricia Davidson, who was elected to the Canadian House of Commons in the 2006 federal election as the Conservative Member of Parliament for Sarnia—Lambton. Davidson also served as mayor of the village of Wyoming for ten years prior to her election as mayor of the amalgamated town. Davidson was succeeded as mayor by former town councillor and deputy mayor Lonny Napper in March 2006
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Canadian House Of Commons
Her Majesty's Government     Liberal Party (183)Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition     Conservative Party (97)Other parties:Parties with official status     New Democratic Party
New Democratic Party
(44)Parties without official status     Quebec
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Sarnia
Sarnia
Sarnia
is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, and had a 2016 population of 71,594.[1] It is the largest city on Lake Huron
Lake Huron
and in Lambton County. Sarnia
Sarnia
is located on the eastern bank of the junction between the Upper and Lower Great Lakes
Great Lakes
where Lake Huron
Lake Huron
flows into the St. Clair River, which forms the Canada– United States
United States
border, directly across from Port Huron, Michigan. The city's natural harbour first attracted the French explorer La Salle, who named the site "The Rapids" when he had horses and men pull his 45 tonnes (50 short tons; 44 long tons) barque "Le Griffon" up the almost four-knot current[4] of the St. Clair River
St

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Canada 2006 Census
The Canada
Canada
2006 Census
Census
was a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population. Census
Census
day was May 16, 2006. The following census was the 2011 Census. Canada's total population enumerated by the 2006 census was 31,612,897. This count was lower than the official July 1, 2006 population estimate of 32,623,490 people.[1]Contents1 Summary 2 Data products2.1 Population and dwelling counts 2.2 Age and sex 2.3 Families, marital status, households and dwelling characteristics 2.4 Immigration, citizenship, language, mobility and migration 2.5 Aboriginal peoples 2.6 Labour, place of work/commuting to work, education, language 2.7 Ethnic origin, visible minorities 2.8 Income/earnings, shelter costs3 Advertising 4 Outsourcing 5 Forms 6 Controversy 7 See also 8 External links 9 ReferencesSummary[edit] Over 12.7 million households, 32.5 million people were expected to be counted
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Canada 2011 Census
The Canada
Canada
2011 Census
Census
is a detailed enumeration of the Canadian population on May 10, 2011. Statistics Canada, an agency of the Canadian government, conducts a nationwide census every five years. In 2011, it consisted of a mandatory short form census questionnaire and an inaugural National Household Survey (NHS),[1][2] a voluntary survey which replaced the mandatory long form census questionnaire; this substitution was the focus of much controversy
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Wyoming Railway Station (Ontario)
Wyoming railway station is a Via Rail station in Plympton–Wyoming, Ontario. It serves trains running from Toronto west to Sarnia. The station is wheelchair accessible. The shelter is set back off of Broadway Street in downtown Wyoming. Train 84 stops in Wyoming at 06:26 and Train 87 stops at 22:05, 7 days a week. Reservations are required 40 minutes in advance for trains 84 and 87 to stop at this location.[1] External links[edit]Wyoming train station on VIARail.caReferences[edit]^ "Corridor Schedule: Toronto-London-Sarnia" (PDF). VIA Rail. 31 October 2016. Retrieved 24 November 2016. This article about a railway station in Ontario is a stub
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Lake Huron
Lake Huron
Lake Huron
is one of the five Great Lakes
Great Lakes
of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the 5-mile-wide (8.0 km), 20-fathom-deep (120 ft; 37 m) Straits of Mackinac. It is shared on the north and east by the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
and on the south and west by the state of Michigan
Michigan
in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. The Huronian glaciation was named due to evidence collected from Lake Huron region. The northern parts of the lake include the North Channel and Georgian Bay. Across the lake to the southwest is Saginaw Bay. The main inlet is the St
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Statistics Canada
Statistics
Statistics
Canada
Canada
(French: Statistique Canada), which was formed in 1971, is the Government of Canada
Canada
government agency commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. Its headquarters is in Ottawa.[1] The bureau is commonly called StatCan or StatsCan. StatCan is the official abbreviation. It has regularly been considered the best statistical organization in the world by The Economist,[2] such as in the 1991 and 1993 "Good Statistics" surveys. Public Policy Forum
Public Policy Forum
and others have also ranked it first.[citation needed] Statistics
Statistics
is a federal responsibility in Canada
Canada
and Statistics
Statistics
Canada produces statistics for all the provinces as well as the federal government
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Devon
Devon
Devon
(/ˈdɛvən/), also known as Devonshire, which was formerly its common and official name, is a county of England, reaching from the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
in the north to the English Channel
English Channel
in the south. It is part of South West England, bounded by Cornwall
Cornwall
to the west, Somerset
Somerset
to the northeast, and Dorset
Dorset
to the east
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Plympton
Plympton, or Plympton Maurice or Plympton St Maurice or Plympton St Mary or Plympton Erle, in south-western Devon, is a populous, north-eastern suburb of the city of Plymouth of which it officially became part, along with Plymstock, in 1967
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Munsee Language
Munsee (also known as Munsee Delaware, Delaware, Ontario
Ontario
Delaware) is an endangered language of the Eastern Algonquian subgroup of the Algonquian language family, itself a branch of the Algic language family. Munsee is one of the two Delaware languages
Delaware languages
(also known as Lenape
Lenape
languages, after the tribe's autonym). It is very closely related to the extinct Unami Delaware, but the two are sufficiently different that they are considered separate languages
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Conservative Party Of Canada
The Conservative Party of Canada
Canada
(French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a political party in Canada
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Canadian Federal Election, 2006
Paul Martin LiberalPrime Minister-designate Stephen Harper ConservativeMap of the ridings and their popular voteThe 2006 Canadian federal election (more formally, the 39th General Election) was held on January 23, 2006, to elect members of the House of Commons of Canada
Canada
of the 39th Parliament of Canada. The Conservative Party of Canada
Canada
won the greatest number of seats: 40.3% of seats, or 124 out of 308, up from 99 seats in 2004, and 36.3% of votes: up from 29.6% in the 2004 election.[1] The election resulted in a minority government led by the Conservative Party with Stephen Harper
Stephen Harper
becoming the 22nd Prime Minister of Canada. By proportion of seats, this was Canada's smallest minority government since Confederation
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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