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Plantation
A plantation is a large-scale farm that specializes in cash crops. The crops grown include cotton, coffee, tea, cocoa, sugar cane, sisal, oil seeds, oil palms, rubber trees, and fruits. Protectionist policies and natural comparative advantage have sometimes contributed to determining where plantations were located. A plantation house is the main house of a plantation, often a substantial farmhouse, which often serves as a symbol for the plantation as a whole. Plantation
Plantation
houses in the Southern United States and in other areas were often quite grand and expensive architectural works. Among the earliest examples of plantations were the latifundia of the Roman Empire, which produced large quantities of wine and olive oil for export. Plantation
Plantation
agriculture grew rapidly with the increase in international trade and the development of a worldwide economy that followed the expansion of European colonial empires
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Monoculture
Monoculture
Monoculture
is the agricultural practice of producing or growing a single crop, plant, or livestock species, variety, or breed in a field or farming system at a time. Polyculture, where more than one crop is grown in the same space at the same time, is the alternative to monoculture.[1] Monoculture
Monoculture
is widely used in both industrial farming and organic farming and has allowed increased efficiency in planting and harvest. Continuous monoculture, or monocropping, where the same species is grown year after year,[2] can lead to the quicker buildup of pests and diseases, and then rapid spread where a uniform crop is susceptible to a pathogen. The practice has been criticized for its environmental effects and for putting the food supply chain at risk
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Forestry Commission
The Forestry
Forestry
Commission is a non-ministerial government department responsible for forestry in England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
(on 1 April 2013 Forestry
Forestry
Commission Wales merged with other agencies to become Natural Resources Wales[2]). It was set up in 1919 to expand Britain's forests and woodland after depletion during the First World War. To do this, the commission bought large amounts of former agricultural land, eventually becoming the largest land owner in Britain. The Commission is divided into three divisions: Forestry
Forestry
Commission England, Forestry Commission Scotland, and Forest Research. Forestry
Forestry
Commission Scotland reports to the Scottish Government. Over time the purpose of the Commission broadened to include many other activities beyond timber production
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Weyerhaeuser
Weyerhaeuser
Weyerhaeuser
(pronounced "Warehouser"[5]) Company, is one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands, owning or controlling nearly 13 million acres of timberlands in the U.S. and managing additional timberlands under long-term licenses in Canada. The company also manufactures wood products. Weyerhaeuser
Weyerhaeuser
is a real estate investment trust.[2]Contents1 History 2 Operations 3 Corporate governance 4 References4.1 Further reading5 External linksHistory[edit]This section has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This section needs expansion with: further historical highlights, esp. around the very well-sourced founding period. You can help by adding to it. (September 2014)This section needs additional citations for verification
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Sierra Pacific Industries
Sierra Pacific Industries is the second largest lumber producer[1] in the United States. Located in Anderson, California, it manages almost 1.9 million acres of timberland. It is the largest private landholder in California.[2] References[edit]^ About Sierra Pacific Industries. Sierra Pacific Industries. Retrieved January 27, 2014. ^ Curiel, Jonathan (February 29, 2008). "Getting clear with Sierra Pacific Industries". SFGate. This United States
United States
corporation or company article is a stub
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Forest Genetic Resources
Forest genetic resources or tree genetic resources are genetic material of shrub and tree species of actual or future value. Forest genetic resources are essential for forest-depending communities who rely for a substantial part of their livelihoods on timber and non-timber forest products (for example fruits, gums and resins) for food security, domestic use and income generation. These resources are also the basis for large-scale wood production in planted forests to satisfy the worldwide need for timber and paper
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Grand Fir
Abies grandis
Abies grandis
(grand fir, giant fir, lowland white fir, great silver fir, western white fir, Vancouver fir, or Oregon
Oregon
fir) is a fir native to the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
and Northern California
Northern California
of North America, occurring at altitudes of sea level to 1,800 m. It is a major constituent of the Grand Fir/Douglas Fir
Fir
Ecoregion of the Cascade Range. The tree typically grows to 40–70 m in height. There are two varieties, the taller coast grand fir, found west of the Cascade Mountains, and the shorter interior grand fir, found east of the Cascades. It was first described in 1831 by David Douglas.[2] It is closely related to white fir. The bark has historical medicinal properties, and it is popular in the United States
United States
as a Christmas tree
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Scotland
Scotland
Scotland
(/ˈskɒtlənd/; Scots: [ˈskɔtlənd]; Scottish Gaelic: Alba
Alba
[ˈal̪ˠapə] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain.[16][17][18] It shares a border with England
England
to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea
North Sea
to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the south-west. In addition to the mainland, the country is made up of more than 790 islands,[19] including the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
and the Hebrides. The Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
emerged as an independent sovereign state in the Early Middle Ages
Early Middle Ages
and continued to exist until 1707
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Tillage
Tillage
Tillage
is the agricultural preparation of soil by mechanical agitation of various types, such as digging, stirring, and overturning. Examples of human-powered tilling methods using hand tools include shovelling, picking, mattock work, hoeing, and raking. Examples of draft-animal-powered or mechanized work include ploughing (overturning with moldboards or chiseling with chisel shanks), rototilling, rolling with cultipackers or other rollers, harrowing, and cultivating with cultivator shanks (teeth). Small-scale gardening and farming, for household food production or small business production, tends to use the smaller-scale methods, whereas medium- to large-scale farming tends to use the larger-scale methods. There is a fluid continuum, however
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Coast Douglas-fir
Pseudotsuga
Pseudotsuga
menziesii var. menziesii, also known as coast Douglas-fir, Oregon
Oregon
pine, or Douglas spruce, is an evergreen conifer native to western North America
North America
from west-central British Columbia, Canada southward to central California, United States. In Oregon
Oregon
and Washington its range is continuous from the Cascades crest west to the Pacific Coast Ranges
Pacific Coast Ranges
and Pacific Ocean. In California, it is found in the Klamath and California
California
Coast Ranges as far south as the Santa Lucia Mountains with a small stand as far south as the Purisima Hills, Santa Barbara County.[1] In the Sierra Nevada it ranges as far south as the Yosemite region. It occurs from near sea level along the coast to 1,800 metres (5,900 ft) in the California
California
Mountains
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Live Crown
The live crown is the top part of a tree, the part that has green leaves (as opposed to the bare trunk, bare branches, and dead leaves). The ratio of the size of a tree's live crown to its total height is used in estimating its health and its level of competition with neighboring trees.Trees portalThis tree-related article is a stub
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Timber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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Particleboard
Particle board
Particle board
– also known as particleboard, low-density fibreboard (LDF), and chipboard – is an engineered wood product manufactured from wood chips, sawmill shavings, or even sawdust, and a synthetic resin or other suitable binder, which is pressed and extruded.[1] Oriented strand board, also known as flakeboard, waferboard, or chipboard, is similar but uses machined wood flakes offering more strength. All of these are composite materials[2] that belong to the spectrum of fiberboard products.Contents1 Characteristics 2 History and development 3 Manufacturing 4 Furniture design 5 Safety 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit]The cross section of a particle board Particle board
Particle board
is cheaper, denser and more uniform than conventional wood and plywood and is substituted for them when cost is more important than strength and appearance
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Oriented Strand Board
Oriented strand board
Oriented strand board
(OSB), also known as flakeboard, sterling board and aspenite in British English, is a type of engineered lumber similar to particle board, formed by adding adhesives and then compressing layers of wood strands (flakes) in specific orientations. It was invented by Armin Elmendorf in California in 1963.[1] OSB may have a rough and variegated surface with the individual strips of around 2.5 cm × 15 cm (1.0 by 5.9 inches), lying unevenly across each other and comes in a variety
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Kyoto Protocol
The Kyoto
Kyoto
Protocol is an international treaty which extends the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change
(UNFCCC) that commits State Parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, based on the scientific consensus that (a) global warming is occurring and (b) it is extremely likely that human-made CO2 emissions have predominantly caused it. The Kyoto
Kyoto
Protocol was adopted in Kyoto, Japan, on December 11, 1997 and entered into force on February 16, 2005
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