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Pillar Of Eliseg
The Pillar of Eliseg
Pillar of Eliseg
— also known as Elise's Pillar or Croes Elisedd in Welsh — stands near Valle Crucis Abbey, Denbighshire, Wales.[1] It was erected by Cyngen ap Cadell (died 855), king of Powys in honour of his great-grandfather Elisedd ap Gwylog. The form Eliseg found on the pillar is thought to be a mistake by the carver of the inscription.Contents1 History 2 Inscription 3 Archaeological examination 4 See also 5 External links 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Whilst the pillar itself dates to the 9th century, the mound is thought to be significantly older, possibly prehistoric. Certainly the mound can be dated to the Bronze Age. Inscription[edit] The Latin
Latin
inscription consisted of some thirty-one lines of insular script
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Denbighshire
Denbighshire
Denbighshire
(Welsh: Sir Ddinbych; [ˌsiːr ˈðɪnbɨ̞χ]) is a county in north-east Wales, named after the historic county of Denbighshire, but with substantially different borders. Denbighshire is the longest known inhabited part of Wales. Pontnewydd (Bontnewydd-Llanelwy) Palaeolithic site has Neanderthal
Neanderthal
remains from 225,000 years ago. Its several castles include Denbigh, Rhuddlan, Ruthin, Castell Dinas Bran
Castell Dinas Bran
and Bodelwyddan. St Asaph, one of the smallest cities in Britain, has one of the smallest Anglican cathedrals. Denbighshire
Denbighshire
has a length of coast to the north and hill ranges to the east, south and west. In the central part, the River Clwyd
Clwyd
has created a broad fertile valley. It is primarily a rural county with little industry
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John Rhys
Sir John Rhys, PC, FBA (also spelled Rhŷs;[1] 21 June 1840 – 17 December 1915) was a Welsh scholar, fellow of the British Academy, Celticist and the first Professor of Celtic at Oxford University.[2]Contents1 Early years and education 2 Career 3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly years and education[edit] He was born John Rees at Ponterwyd
Ponterwyd
in Ceredigion, to a lead miner and farmer, Hugh Rees, and his wife. Rhys was educated at schools in Pantyffynnon
Pantyffynnon
and Ponterwyd
Ponterwyd
before moving to the British School, a recently opened institution at Penllwyn, in 1855. Here Rhys was enrolled as a pupil and teacher, and after leaving studied at Bangor Normal College from 1860 to 1861. Upon leaving Bangor Normal College, Rhys gained employment as headmaster at Rhos-y-bol, Anglesey
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Gratian
Gratian
Gratian
(/ˈɡreɪʃən/; Latin: Flavius Gratianus Augustus;[1] Greek: Γρατιανός; 18 April/23 May 359 – 25 August 383) was Roman emperor from 367 to 383. The eldest son of Valentinian I, Gratian accompanied, during his youth, his father on several campaigns along the Rhine
Rhine
and Danube
Danube
frontiers. Upon the death of Valentinian in 375, Gratian's brother Valentinian II
Valentinian II
was declared emperor by his father's soldiers
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Early Bronze Age
The Bronze
Bronze
Age is a historical period characterized by the use of bronze, proto-writing, and other early features of urban civilization. The Bronze
Bronze
Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze- Iron
Iron
system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies. An ancient civilization is defined to be in the Bronze
Bronze
Age either by producing bronze by smelting its own copper and alloying with tin, arsenic, or other metals, or by trading for bronze from production areas elsewhere
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Cist
A cist (/ˈsɪst/ or /ˈkɪst/; also kist /ˈkɪst/;[1][2] from Greek: κίστη or Germanic Kiste) is a small stone-built coffin-like box or ossuary used to hold the bodies of the dead. Examples can be found across Europe and in the Middle East.[3][4][5][6] A cist may have been associated with other monuments, perhaps under a cairn or long barrow. Several cists are sometimes found close together within the same cairn or barrow
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Edward Lhuyd
Edward Lhuyd
Edward Lhuyd
(pronounced [ˈɬʊɨd]; occasionally written as Llwyd in recent times, in accordance with Modern Welsh orthography) (1660 – 30 June 1709) was a Welsh naturalist, botanist, linguist, geographer and antiquary. He is also known by the Latinized form of his name, Eduardus Luidius.Contents1 Life 2 Pioneering linguist 3 Legacy 4 Further reading 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Lhuyd was born in Loppington, Shropshire, the illegitimate son of Edward Lloyd of Llanforda, Oswestry
Oswestry
and Bridget Pryse of Llansantffraid, near Talybont, Cardiganshire, and was a pupil and later a master at Oswestry
Oswestry
Grammar School. His family belonged to the gentry of south-west Wales; though well-established, his family was not well-off, and his father experimented with agriculture and industry in a manner that brought him into contact with the new science of the day
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English Civil War
Parliamentarian victoryExecution of King Charles I Exile of Charles II Establishment of the republican Commonwealth under Oliver CromwellBelligerentsEnglish, Scottish, Welsh and Irish Royalists English, Scottish, Welsh and Irish ParliamentariansCommanders and leadersKing Charles I   Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert
of the Rhine Charles IIEarl of Essex Thomas Fairfax Oliver CromwellCasualties and losses50,000[1] 34,000[1]127,000 noncombat deaths (including some 40,000 civilians)[a]v t eEnglish Civil WarFirst Second ThirdThe English Civil War
English Civil War
(1642–1651) was a series of armed conflicts and political machinations between Parliamentarians ("Roundheads") and Royalists ("Cavaliers") over, principally, the manner of England's government
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Roundhead
Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
during the English Civil War. Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against Charles I of England
Charles I of England
and his supporters, the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the divine right of kings.[1] The goal of the Roundhead
Roundhead
party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration.[2]Contents1 Beliefs 2 Origins and background 3 Notes 4 ReferencesBeliefs[edit] Most Roundheads sought constitutional monarchy in place of the absolutist monarchy sought by Charles I
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Viking
Vikings
Vikings
(Old English: wicing—"pirate",[1] Danish and Bokmål: vikinger; Swedish and Nynorsk: vikingar; Icelandic: víkingar, from Old Norse) were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of northern, central, eastern and western Europe, during the late 8th to late 11th centuries.[2][3] The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Viking home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age
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Insular Script
Insular script
Insular script
was a medieval script system invented in Ireland
Ireland
that spread to Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
and continental Europe under the influence of Irish Christianity. Irish missionaries also took the script to continental Europe, where they founded monasteries such as Bobbio. The scripts were also used in monasteries like Fulda, which were influenced by English missionaries. It is associated with Insular art, of which most surviving examples are illuminated manuscripts. It greatly influenced Irish orthography
Irish orthography
and modern Gaelic scripts in handwriting and typefaces. Insular script
Insular script
comprised a family of different scripts used for different functions. At the top of the hierarchy was the Insular half-uncial (or "Insular majuscule"), used for important documents and sacred text
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Kingdom Of Powys
The Kingdom of Powys
Powys
was a Welsh successor state, petty kingdom and principality that emerged during the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
following the end of Roman rule in Britain. It very roughly covered the top two thirds of the modern county of Powys
Powys
and part of the West Midlands (see map). More precisely, and based on the Romano-British tribal lands of the Ordovices
Ordovices
in the west and the Cornovii in the east, its boundaries originally extended from the Cambrian Mountains
Cambrian Mountains
in the west to include the modern West Midlands region of England in the east
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