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Pietism
Pietism
Pietism
(/ˈpaɪ.ɪtɪsm/, from the word piety) was an influential movement in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
that combined its emphasis on Biblical doctrine with the Reformed emphasis on individual piety and living a vigorous Christian life.[1] Although the movement was active exclusively within Lutheranism, it had a tremendous impact on Protestantism
Protestantism
worldwide, particularly in North America and Europe. Pietism
Pietism
originated in modern Germany
Germany
in the late 17th century with the work of Philipp Spener, a Lutheran theologian whose emphasis on personal transformation through spiritual rebirth and renewal, individual devotion and piety laid the foundations for the movement
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Hans Egede
Egede may refer to:PlacesEgede, Nigeria, a town in Enugu State of Nigeria Egede, a hamlet in the Dutch province of Overijssel Egede, a lunar crater Hans Egede Church, in Nuuk, GreenlandPeople Hans Poulsen Egede
Hans Poulsen Egede
(1686–1758), Dano-Norwegian merchant and missionary to Greenland
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Sola Gratia
Sola gratia (Latin: by grace alone) is one of the Five solae propounded to summarise the Lutheran
Lutheran
and Reformed
Reformed
leaders' basic beliefs during the Protestant Reformation.[1] These Lutheran
Lutheran
and Reformed
Reformed
leaders believed that this emphasis was in contradistinction to the teaching of the Catholic Church, though it had explicitly affirmed the doctrine of sola gratia in the year 529 at the Council of Orange, which condemned the Pelagian heresy.[2] As a response to this misunderstanding, Catholic doctrine was further clarified in the Council of Trent
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Luther Rose
The Luther seal or Luther rose
Luther rose
is a widely recognized symbol for Lutheranism. It was the seal that was designed for Martin Luther
Martin Luther
at the behest of John Frederick of Saxony in 1530, while Luther was staying at the Coburg
Coburg
Fortress during the Diet of Augsburg. Lazarus Spengler, to whom Luther wrote his interpretation below, sent Luther a drawing of this seal
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Baptism (Lutheran Church)
Baptism
Baptism
(from the Greek noun βάπτισμα baptisma; see below) is a Christian
Christian
sacrament of admission and adoption,[1] almost invariably with the use of water, into the Christian Church
Christian Church
generally.[2][3] The canonical Gospels report that Jesus
Jesus
was baptized[4]—a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned.[5][6][7] Baptism
Baptism
has been called a holy sacrament and an ordinance of Jesus Christ
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Anointing Of The Sick
Anointing
Anointing
of the sick, known also by other names, is a form of religious anointing or "unction" (an older term with the same meaning) for the benefit of a sick person. It is practiced by many Christian churches and denominations. Anointing
Anointing
of the sick was a customary practice in many civilizations, including among the ancient Greeks and early Jewish communities
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Homosexuality And Lutheranism
Lutheran viewpoints concerning homosexuality are diverse because there is no one worldwide body which represents all Lutherans. The Lutheran World Federation, a worldwide 'communion of churches' and the largest global body of Lutherans, contains member churches on both sides of the issue
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Awakening (religious Movement)
Awakening or The Awakening may refer to:Wakefulness, the state of being consciousContents1 Religion 2 Politics 3 Film and TV3.1 Film 3.2 Television4 Literature 5 Music5.1 Classical 5.2 Albums 5.3 Songs6 Games 7 Other uses 8 See alsoReligion[edit] Awakening (religious movement), a Lutheran movement in Finland Great Awakening, several periods of Anglo-American Christian revival Bodhi
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Athanasian Creed
The Athanasian Creed, also known as Pseudo-Athanasian Creed
Creed
or Quicunque Vult (also Quicumque Vult), is a Christian statement of belief focused on Trinitarian doctrine and Christology. The Latin
Latin
name of the creed, Quicunque vult, is taken from the opening words, "Whosoever wishes". The creed has been used by Christian churches since the sixth century. It is the first creed in which the equality of the three persons of the Trinity
Trinity
is explicitly stated
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Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed
Creed
(Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νικαίας or, τῆς πίστεως, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because it was originally adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day İznik, Turkey) by the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325.[1] In 381, it was amended at the First Council of Constantinople, and the amended form is referred to as the Nicene or the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. The Oriental Orthodox and Assyrian churches use this profession of faith with the verbs in the original plural ("we believe") form, but the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic churches convert those verbs to the singular ("I believe")
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Laestadianism
Laestadianism
Laestadianism
is a conservative Lutheran
Lutheran
revival movement started in Lapland in the middle of the 19th century. Named after Swedish state church administrator and temperance movement leader Lars Levi Laestadius, it is strongly marked by both pietistic and Moravian influences. It is the biggest revivalist movement in the Nordic countries. It has members mainly in Finland, North America, Norway, Russia
Russia
and Sweden. There are also smaller congregations in Africa, South America and Central Europe
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Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
(from Greek γνήσιος [gnesios]: genuine, authentic)[citation needed] is a modern name for a theological party in the Lutheran churches,[1] in opposition to the Philippists[2] after the death of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and before the Formula of Concord. In their own day they were called Flacians by their opponents and simply Lutherans by themselves. Later Flacian became to mean an adherent of Matthias Flacius' view of original sin, rejected by the Formula of Concord. In a broader meaning, the term Gnesio-Lutheran is associated mostly with the defence of the doctrine of Real Presence. Controversies[edit] After the death of Luther, many theological controversies arose among the Lutherans, mostly due to teaching of Philip Melanchthon. Gnesio-Lutherans
Gnesio-Lutherans
were profiled by defending Martin Luther's doctrine, in the beginning led by Matthias Flacius
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Lutheranism By Region
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is present on all inhabited continents with an estimated 80 million adherents,[1] out of which 74.2 million are affiliated with the Lutheran World Federation. A major movement that first began the Reformation, it constitutes one of the largest Protestant
Protestant
branches claiming around 80 million out of 920 million Protestants.[2] The Lutheran World Federation
Lutheran World Federation
brings together the vast majority of Lutherans. Apart from it, there are also other organisations such as the International Lutheran Council
International Lutheran Council
and the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference, as well as multiple independent Lutheran denominations. Today, almost half of Lutherans are living in Europe. Germany
Germany
accounts for one-third of European Lutherans and one-eighth of the world's Lutheran population
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Theology Of The Cross
The theology of the Cross (Latin: Theologia Crucis)[1] or staurology[2] (from Greek stauros: cross, and -logy: "the study of")[3] is a term coined by the theologian Martin Luther[1] to refer to theology that posits the cross as the only source of knowledge concerning who God is and how God saves. It is contrasted with the Theology of Glory[1] (theologia gloriae),[1] which places greater emphasis on human abilities and human reason.Contents1 Catholic understanding 2 As defined by Luther2.1 Theses 2.2 Tenets3 See also 4 Notes 5 Bibliography 6 External linksCatholic understanding[edit] Paragraph 2015 of the CCC describes the way of perfection as passing by way of the Cross. There is no holiness without renunciation and spiritual battle. Spiritual progress entails the ascesis and mortification that gradually leads to living in the peace and joy of the beatitudes. As defined by Luther[edit] The term theologia crucis was used very rarely by Luther
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Lutheran World Federation
The Lutheran World Federation
Lutheran World Federation
(LWF; German: Lutherischer Weltbund) is a global communion of national and regional Lutheran churches headquartered in the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva, Switzerland. The federation was founded in the Swedish city of Lund
Lund
in the aftermath of the Second World War
Second World War
in 1947 to coordinate the activities of the many differing Lutheran churches
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International Lutheran Council
The International Lutheran Council
International Lutheran Council
is a worldwide association of confessional Lutheran denominations. It is to be distinguished from the Lutheran World Federation
Lutheran World Federation
and the Confessional Evangelical Lutheran Conference. The member church bodies of the ILC are not required to be in church-fellowship with one another, though many of them are
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