HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Pierre André Latreille
PIERRE ANDRé LATREILLE (29 November 1762 – 6 February 1833) was a French zoologist , specialising in arthropods . Having trained as a Roman Catholic priest before the French Revolution , Latreille was imprisoned, and only regained his freedom after recognising a rare beetle species he found in the prison, Necrobia ruficollis
Necrobia ruficollis
. He published his first important work in 1796 (Précis des caractères génériques des insectes), and was eventually employed by the Muséum National d\'Histoire Naturelle . His foresighted work on arthropod systematics and taxonomy gained him respect and accolades, including being asked to write the volume on arthropods for George Cuvier 's monumental work, Le Règne Animal , the only part not by Cuvier himself. Latreille was considered the foremost entomologist of his time, and was described by one of his pupils as "the prince of entomologists"
[...More...]

"Pierre André Latreille" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Latreille (other)
DISAMBIGUATION is word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. DISAMBIGUATION may also refer to: * Sentence boundary disambiguation , the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end * Memory disambiguation , a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMUSIC * Ø (Disambiguation) , a 2010 album by Underoath * Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album) , a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSEE ALSO * Ambiguity , an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolved This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title DISAMBIGUATION. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Disambiguation_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
[...More...]

"Latreille (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Brive-la-Gaillarde
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. BRIVE-LA-GAILLARDE (French pronunciation: ​ ; Limousin dialect of Occitan language: Briva la Galharda) is a commune of France . It is a sub-prefecture of the Corrèze department . It has around 50,000 inhabitants, while the population of the urban area was 89,260 in 1999. Although it is by far the biggest commune in Corrèze, the capital is Tulle . In French popular culture, the town is associated with a song by Georges Brassens . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Climate * 3 Administration * 4 Population * 5 Transport * 6 Sport * 7 Personalities * 8 International relations * 8.1 Twin towns – Sister cities * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links HISTORYEven though the inhabitants settled around the 1st century, the city only started to grow much later. From around the 5th century onwards, the original city began to develop around a church dedicated to Saint-Martin-l'Espagnol. During the 12th century walls were built around the city and during the Hundred Years\' War a second wall was built. These fortifications no longer exist and have been replaced by boulevards
[...More...]

"Brive-la-Gaillarde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corrèze
CORRèZE (French pronunciation: ​ ; Occitan : Corresa) is a department in south-western France, named after the river Corrèze which runs though it. Its capital is Tulle and its most populated town is Brive-la-Gaillarde The inhabitants of the department are called Corréziens. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Politics * 4 Tourism * 5 People * 6 See also * 7 External links HISTORY Corrèze
Corrèze
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on 4 March 1790. It includes part of the former province of Limousin (the Bas-Limousin). The 1851 census recorded a population of 320,866: this remained relatively constant for the rest of the nineteenth century. During the twentieth century, however, Corrèze
Corrèze
shared the experience of many of the country's rural departments as the population fell steadily. Within Corrèze
Corrèze
the nineteenth-century railway planners, influenced in part by the department's topography, endowed Brive-la-Gaillarde with good connections and a major junction from which railway lines fanned out in six different directions. The railways arrived in 1860, at an opportune moment, directly after phylloxera had destroyed the local wine industry
[...More...]

"Corrèze" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 _Population without double counting _: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. PARIS (locally ( listen )) is the capital and most populous city of France
France
. It has an area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and a population of 2,229,621 in 2015 within its administrative limits. The city is both a commune and department and forms the centre and headquarters of the Île-de- France
France
, or Paris
Paris
Region, which has an area of 12,012 square kilometres (4,638 square miles) and a population in 2016 of 12,142,802, comprising roughly 18 percent of the population of France. By the 17th century, Paris
Paris
was one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts, and it retains that position still today. The Paris Region had a GDP
GDP
of €649.6 billion (US $763.4 billion) in 2014, accounting for 30.4 percent of the GDP
GDP
of France. According to official estimates, the Paris Region has the fourth-highest GDP
GDP
in the world and the largest regional GDP
GDP
in the EU
[...More...]

"Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

France
FRANCE (locally ), officially the FRENCH REPUBLIC (_République française_ ), is a country with territory status in western Europe and several overseas regions and territories . The European, or metropolitan, area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea , and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean . The republic also includes French Guiana on the South American continent and several islands in the Atlantic , Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions (5 of which are situated overseas) span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) which, as of January 2017, has a total population of almost 67 million people. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris , the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban centres include Marseille , Lyon , Lille , Nice , Toulouse and Bordeaux . During the Iron Age , what is now metropolitan France was inhabited by the Gauls , a Celtic people. The area was annexed in 51 BC by Rome , which held Gaul until 486, when the Germanic Franks conquered the region and formed the Kingdom of France
[...More...]

"France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Entomology
ENTOMOLOGY (from Greek ἔντομον, _entomon_ "insect"; and -λογία, _-logia_) is the scientific study of insects , a branch of zoology . In the past the term "insect" was more vague, and historically the definition of entomology included the study of terrestrial animals in other arthropod groups or other phyla , such as arachnids , myriapods , earthworms , land snails , and slugs . This wider meaning may still be encountered in informal use. Like several of the other fields that are categorized within zoology , entomology is a taxon -based category; any form of scientific study in which there is a focus on insect-related inquiries is, by definition, entomology. Entomology therefore overlaps with a cross-section of topics as diverse as molecular genetics , behavior , biomechanics , biochemistry , systematics , physiology , developmental biology , ecology , morphology , and paleontology . At some 1.3 million described species, insects account for more than two-thirds of all known organisms, date back some 400 million years, and have many kinds of interactions with humans and other forms of life on earth
[...More...]

"Entomology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arachnology
ARACHNOLOGY is the scientific study of spiders and related animals such as scorpions , pseudoscorpions , and harvestmen , collectively called arachnids . Those who study spiders and other arachnids are ARACHNOLOGISTS. The word arachnology derives from Greek ἀράχνη, arachnē, "spider"; and -λογία, -logia . CONTENTS* 1 Arachnology as a science * 1.1 Subdisciplines * 2 Arachnological societies * 3 Arachnological journals * 4 Popular arachnology * 5 See also * 6 External Information Links ARACHNOLOGY AS A SCIENCEArachnologists are primarily responsible for classifying arachnids and studying aspects of their biology. In the popular imagination they are sometimes referred to as 'spider experts'. Disciplines within arachnology include naming species and determining their evolutionary relationships to one another (taxonomy and systematics), studying how they interact with other members of their species and/or their environment (behavioural ecology ), or how they are distributed in different regions and habitats (faunistics ). Other arachnologists perform research on the anatomy or physiology of arachnids, including the venom of spiders and scorpions. Others study the impact of spiders in agricultural ecosystems and whether they can be used as biological control agents. SUBDISCIPLINES Arachnology can be broken down into more specific specialties
[...More...]

"Arachnology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Carcinology
CARCINOLOGY is a branch of zoology that consists of the study of crustaceans , a group of arthropods that includes lobsters , crayfish , shrimp , krill , barnacles and crabs . Other names for carcinology are malacostracology, crustaceology, and crustalogy, and a person who study crustaceans is a CARCINOLOGIST or occasionally a malacostracologist, a crustaceologist, or a crustalogist. The word carcinology derives from Greek καρκίνος, karkínos, "crab"; and -λογία, -logia
[...More...]

"Carcinology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muséum National D'Histoire Naturelle
The French NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, known in French as the MUSéUM NATIONAL D\'HISTOIRE NATURELLE (abbreviation MNHN), is the national natural history museum of France
France
and a grand établissement of higher education part of Sorbonne
Sorbonne
Universities . The main museum is located in Paris
Paris
, France
France
, on the left bank of the River Seine
Seine
. It was founded in 1793 during the French Revolution , but was established earlier in 1635. As of 2017, the museum has 14 sites throughout France, with four in Paris, including the original location at the royal botanical garden , the Jardin des Plantes , which remains one of the seven departments of MNHN. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Origin of the collections * 3 Mission and organization * 4 Location and branches * 5 Chairs * 6 In popular culture * 7 Directors * 8 Friends * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links HISTORYThe museum was formally founded on 10 June 1793, during the French Revolution. Its origins lie, however, in the Jardin royal des plantes médicinales (royal garden of medicinal plants) created by King Louis XIII in 1635, which was directed and run by the royal physicians
[...More...]

"Muséum National D'Histoire Naturelle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Alma Mater
ALMA MATER ( Latin : _alma_ "nourishing/kind", _mater_ "mother"; pl. _almae matres_) is an allegorical Latin phrase for a university or college . In modern usage, it is a school or university which an individual has attended, or a song or hymn associated with a school . The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students. Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its modern usage, _Alma mater_ was an honorific title for various Latin mother goddesses , especially Ceres or Cybele , and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary . It entered academic usage when the University of Bologna adopted the motto "_Alma Mater Studiorum_" ("nurturing mother of studies"), which describes its heritage as the oldest operating university in the Western world . It is related to _alumnus _, a term used for a university graduate that literally means a "nursling" or "one who is nourished"
[...More...]

"Alma Mater" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Paris
The UNIVERSITY OF PARIS (French : _Université de Paris_), metonymically known as the SORBONNE (French: , its historical house), was a university in Paris
Paris
, France
France
, from around 1150 to 1970. Emerging around 1150 as a corporation associated with the cathedral school of Notre Dame de Paris
Paris
, it was considered the second-oldest university in Europe . Officially chartered in 1200 by King
King
Philip II (Philippe-Auguste) of France
France
and recognised in 1215 by Pope Innocent III , it was often nicknamed after its theology collegiate institution, College
College
of Sorbonne
Sorbonne
, founded about 1257 by Robert de Sorbon and charted by Saint Louis , King
King
of France
France
. Internationally highly reputed for its academic performance in the humanities ever since the Middle Ages – notably in theology and philosophy – it introduced several academic standards and traditions that have endured ever since and spread internationally, such as doctoral degrees and student nations . Vast numbers of popes , scientists , intellectuals and royalty were educated at the University of Paris. In 1970, following the May 1968 events , the university was divided into 13 autonomous universities
[...More...]

"University Of Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Author Citation (zoology)
In zoological nomenclature , AUTHOR CITATION refers to listing the person (or team) who first makes a scientific name of a taxon available. This is done in a scientific publication while fulfilling the formal requirements under the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature , hereinafter termed "the Code". According to the Code, "the name of the author does not form part of the name of a taxon and its citation is optional, although customary and often advisable" (Article 51.1), however Recommendation 51A suggests: "The original author and date of a name should be cited at least once in each work dealing with the taxon denoted by that name. This is especially important in distinguishing between homonyms and in identifying species-group names which are not in their original combinations". For the purpose of information retrieval, the author citation and year appended to the scientific name, e.g. genus-species-author-year, genus-author-year, family-author-year, etc., is often considered a "de facto" unique identifier, although for a number of reasons discussed below, this usage may often be imperfect
[...More...]

"Author Citation (zoology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Zoology
ZOOLOGY (/zuːˈɒlədʒi/ , zoo-OL-luh-jee or /zoʊˈɒlədʒi/ , zoh-OL-luh-jee) or ANIMAL BIOLOGY is the branch of biology that studies the animal kingdom, including the structure , embryology , evolution , classification , habits , and distribution of all animals , both living and extinct , and how they interact with their ecosystems. The term is derived from Ancient Greek ζῷον, _zōion_, i.e. "animal " and λόγος, _logos_, i.e. "knowledge, study". CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Ancient history to Darwin * 1.2 Post-Darwin * 2 Research * 2.1 Structural * 2.2 Physiological * 2.3 Evolutionary * 2.4 Classification * 2.5 Ethology * 2.6 Biogeography * 3 Branches of zoology * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYANCIENT HISTORY TO DARWIN _ Conrad Gesner (1516–1565). His Historiae animalium _ is considered the beginning of modern zoology. Main article: History of zoology (through 1859) The history of zoology traces the study of the animal kingdom from ancient to modern times. Although the concept of _zoology_ as a single coherent field arose much later, the zoological sciences emerged from natural history reaching back to the works of Aristotle and Galen in the ancient Greco-Roman world
[...More...]

"Zoology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arthropod
Condylipoda Latreille, 1802 An ARTHROPOD (from Greek ἄρθρον _arthron_, "joint" and πούς _pous_, "foot") is an invertebrate animal having an exoskeleton (external skeleton ), a segmented body, and paired jointed appendages . Arthropods form the phylum ARTHROPODA, which includes insects , arachnids , myriapods , and crustaceans . Arthropods are characterized by their jointed limbs and cuticle made of chitin , often mineralised with calcium carbonate . The arthropod body plan consists of segments , each with a pair of appendages . The rigid cuticle inhibits growth, so arthropods replace it periodically by moulting . Their versatility has enabled them to become the most species-rich members of all ecological guilds in most environments. They have over a million described species, making up more than 80% of all described living animal species, some of which, unlike most animals, are very successful in dry environments. Arthropods range in size from the microscopic crustacean _ Stygotantulus _ up to the Japanese spider crab . Arthropods' primary internal cavity is a hemocoel , which accommodates their internal organs , and through which their haemolymph – analogue of blood – circulates; they have open circulatory systems . Like their exteriors, the internal organs of arthropods are generally built of repeated segments
[...More...]

"Arthropod" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

French Revolution
The FRENCH REVOLUTION (French : _Révolution française_ ) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France that lasted from 1789 until 1799, and was partially carried forward by Napoleon during the later expansion of the French Empire . The Revolution overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, experienced violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon that rapidly brought many of its principles to Western Europe and beyond. Inspired by liberal and radical ideas, the Revolution profoundly altered the course of modern history , triggering the global decline of absolute monarchies while replacing them with republics and liberal democracies . Through the Revolutionary Wars , it unleashed a wave of global conflicts that extended from the Caribbean to the Middle East . Historians widely regard the Revolution as one of the most important events in human history . The causes of the French Revolution are complex and are still debated among historians. Following the Seven Years\' War and the American Revolutionary War , the French government was deeply in debt and attempted to restore its financial status through unpopular taxation schemes, which were heavily regressive
[...More...]

"French Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo