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Phillips Head
A screw drive is a system used to turn a screw.[1][2] At a minimum, it is a set of shaped cavities and protrusions on the screw head that allows torque to be applied to it. Usually, it also involves a mating tool, such as a screwdriver, that is used to turn it. The following heads are categorized based on commonality, with some of the less-common drives being classified as "tamper-resistant". Most heads come in a range of sizes, typically distinguished by a number, such as "Phillips #00" or " Torx
Torx
T5"
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Frearson Brothers
The Frearson brothers, Samuel, Septimus and Robert were businessmmen and publishers in the early days of Adelaide, South Australia, perhaps best remembered for The Pictorial Australian, an illustrated monthly newspaper.Contents1 History 2 Family 3 Publications 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Samuel Frearson (1845 – 22 September 1887), Septimus Frearson (1849 – 23 August 1932) and Robert Sands Frearson (c. 1853 – 26 January 1937) were born in London and emigrated with their parents Alfred Frearson (c. 1811–1867) and Frances Frearson (c
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Vehicles
A vehicle (from Latin: vehiculum[1]) is a mobile machine that transports people or cargo. Typical vehicles include wagons, bicycles, motor vehicles (motorcycles, cars, trucks, buses), railed vehicles (trains, trams), watercraft (ships, boats), aircraft and spacecraft.[2] Land vehicles are classified broadly by what is used to apply steering and drive forces against the ground: wheeled, tracked, railed or skied. ISO 3833-1977 is the standard, also internationally used in legislation, for road vehicles types, terms and definitions.[3]Contents1 History 2 Most popular vehicles 3 Locomotion3.1 Energy source 3.2 Motors and engines 3.3 Converting energy to work 3.4 Friction4 Control4.1 Steering 4.2 Stopping5 Legislation5.1 European Union 5.2 Licensing 5.3 Registration 5.4 Mandatory safety equipment6 Right-of-way 7 Safety 8 See also 9 ReferencesHistory[edit]This article may require cleanup to meet's quality standards
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P. L. Robertson
Peter Lymburner Robertson (December 10, 1879 – September 28, 1951) was a Canadian
Canadian
inventor, industrialist, salesman, and philanthropist who popularized the square-socket drive for screws, often called the Robertson drive. Although a square-socket drive had been conceived decades before (having been patented in 1875 by one Allan Cummings of New York City, U.S. Patent 161,390), it had never been developed into a commercial success because the design was difficult to manufacture. Robertson's efficient manufacturing technique using cold forming for the screw's head is what made the idea a commercial success.[1] He produced his screws (patented in Canada
Canada
in 1909) in his Milton, Ontario, factory starting in 1908
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Patent
A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state or intergovernmental organization to an inventor or assignee for a limited period of time in exchange for detailed public disclosure of an invention. An invention is a solution to a specific technological problem and is a product or a process.[1]:17 Patents are a form of intellectual property. The procedure for granting patents, requirements placed on the patentee, and the extent of the exclusive rights vary widely between countries according to national laws and international agreements. Typically, however, a granted patent application must include one or more claims that define the invention. A patent may include many claims, each of which defines a specific property right. These claims must meet relevant patentability requirements, such as novelty, usefulness, and non-obviousness
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Value Proposition
A value proposition is a promise of value to be delivered, communicated, and acknowledged. It is also a belief from the customer about how value (benefit) will be delivered, experienced and acquired. A value proposition can apply to an entire organization, or parts thereof, or customer accounts, or products or services. Creating a value proposition is a part of business strategy. Kaplan and Norton say "Strategy is based on a differentiated customer value proposition. Satisfying customers is the source of sustainable value creation."[1] Developing a value proposition is based on a review and analysis of the benefits, costs, and value that an organization can deliver to its customers, prospective customers, and other constituent groups within and outside the organization
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Rotary Broaching
Broaching is a machining process that uses a toothed tool, called a broach, to remove material. There are two main types of broaching: linear and rotary. In linear broaching, which is the more common process, the broach is run linearly against a surface of the workpiece to effect the cut. Linear broaches are used in a broaching machine, which is also sometimes shortened to broach. In rotary broaching, the broach is rotated and pressed into the workpiece to cut an axisymmetric shape. A rotary broach is used in a lathe or screw machine. In both processes the cut is performed in one pass of the broach, which makes it very efficient. Broaching is used when precision machining is required, especially for odd shapes. Commonly machined surfaces include circular and non-circular holes, splines, keyways, and flat surfaces. Typical workpieces include small to medium-sized castings, forgings, screw machine parts, and stampings
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Mortising Machine
A mortise (or mortice) and tenon joint is a type of joint that connects two pieces of wood or other material. Woodworkers around the world have used it for thousands of years to join pieces of wood, mainly when the adjoining pieces connect at an angle of 90°. In its basic form, it is both simple and strong. There are many variations of this type of joint, but the basic mortise and tenon comprises two components: the mortise hole and the tenon tongue. The tenon, formed on the end of a member generally referred to as a rail, fits into a square or rectangular hole cut into the corresponding member. The tenon is cut to fit the mortise hole exactly and usually has shoulders that seat when the joint fully enters the mortise hole. The joint may be glued, pinned, or wedged to lock it in place. This joint is also used with other materials
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Henry Ford
Henry Ford
Henry Ford
(July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was an American captain of industry and a business magnate, the founder of the Ford Motor Company, and the sponsor of the development of the assembly line technique of mass production. Although Ford did not invent the automobile or the assembly line,[1] he developed and manufactured the first automobile that many middle-class Americans could afford. In doing so, Ford converted the automobile from an expensive curiosity into a practical conveyance that would profoundly impact the landscape of the 20th century. His introduction of the Model T
Model T
automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. As the owner of the Ford Motor Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism": mass production of inexpensive goods coupled with high wages for workers. Ford had a global vision, with consumerism as the key to peace
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Model T
The Ford Model T
Model T
(colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie, Leaping Lena, or flivver) is an automobile produced by Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
from
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Cylinder Head
In an internal combustion engine, the cylinder head (often informally abbreviated to just head) sits above the cylinders on top of the cylinder block. It closes in the top of the cylinder, forming the combustion chamber. This joint is sealed by a head gasket. In most engines, the head also provides space for the passages that feed air and fuel to the cylinder, and that allow the exhaust to escape
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Drive Train
The drivetrain of a motor vehicle is the group of components that deliver power to the driving wheels.[1] This excludes the engine or motor that generates the power. In contrast, the powertrain is considered to include both the engine or motor and the drivetrain. The market for drivetrain components is economically important and is estimated[by whom?] to reach US$314.4 billion by 2019.[citation needed] Market value by layout is approximately half for front-wheel drive, with a quarter each for rear-wheel drive (mostly in light commercial vehicles and trucks) and all-wheel drive.[citation needed]Contents1 Function 2 Components2.1 Manual transmission car 2.2 Automatic transmission car 2.3 Front-wheel drive car 2.4 Four-wheel drive
Four-wheel drive
off-road vehicle3 See also 4 ReferencesFunction[edit] The function of the drivetrain is to couple the engine that produces the power to the driving wheels that use this mechanical power to rotate the axle
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Audi
Audi
Audi
AG (German: [ˈʔaʊ̯diː ʔaːˈgeː] ( listen)) is a German automobile manufacturer that designs, engineers, produces, markets and distributes luxury vehicles. Audi
Audi
is a member of the Volkswagen Group
Volkswagen Group
and has its roots at Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany. Audi-branded vehicles are produced in nine production facilities worldwide. The origins of the company are complex, going back to the early 20th century and the initial enterprises ( Horch
Horch
and the Audiwerke) founded by engineer August Horch; and two other manufacturers ( DKW
DKW
and Wanderer), leading to the foundation of Auto Union
Auto Union
in 1932
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Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
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BMW
BMW
BMW
(Bayerische Motoren Werke in German, or Bavarian Motor Works in English) is a German multinational company which currently produces automobiles and motorcycles, and also produced aircraft engines until 1945. The company was founded in 1916 and has its headquarters in Munich, Bavaria. BMW
BMW
produces motor vehicles in Germany, Brazil, China, India, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States. In 2015, BMW was the world's twelfth largest producer of motor vehicles, with 2,279,503 vehicles produced.[2] The Quandt family are long-term shareholders of the company, with the remaining stocks owned by public float. Automobiles are marketed under the brands BMW
BMW
(with sub-brands BMW
BMW
M for performance models and BMW i
BMW i
for plug-in electric cars), Mini
Mini
and Rolls-Royce
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