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Philippine Mythology
Philippine mythology
Philippine mythology
is a body of myths, tales, and superstitions held by Filipinos
Filipinos
(composed of more than a hundred ethnic peoples in the Philippines), mostly originating from beliefs held during the pre-Hispanic era. Some of these beliefs stem from pre-Christian religions that were specially influenced by Hinduism
Hinduism
and were regarded by the Spanish as "myths" and "superstitions" in an effort to de-legitimize legitimate precolonial beliefs by forcefully replacing those native beliefs with colonial Catholic Christian myths and superstitions
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Historiography
Historiography
Historiography
is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Scholars discuss historiography by topic—such as the historiography of the United Kingdom, that of WWII, the British Empire, early Islam, and China—and different approaches and genres, such as political history and social history. Beginning in the nineteenth century, with the development of academic history, there developed a body of historiographic literature
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Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Sanskrit
(English: /ˈsænskrɪt/;[6] Sanskrit: संस्कृतम्, romanized: saṃskṛtam, IPA: [ˈsɐ̃skr̩tɐm] (listen)) is a language of ancient India
India
with a 3,500-year history.[7][8][9] It is the primary liturgical language of Hinduism
Hinduism
and the predominant language of most works of Hindu philosophy
Hindu philosophy
as well as some of the principal texts of Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism
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Duwende
A duende is a fairy- or goblin-like mythological creature from Iberian, South American, Chamorro and Filipino folklore. The word is often considered to be the Spanish and Portuguese equivalent of the English word sprite or the Japanese word yōkai and is used as an umbrella term for any fairy-like being such as goblins, pixies and elves. The Spanish term originated as a contraction of the phrase dueño de casa or duen de casa, "possessor of a house", and was originally conceptualized as a mischievous spirit inhabiting a house.[1]Contents1 Usage1.1 Portuguese 1.2 Latin America 1.3 Philippines and Mariana Islands2 Similar folklore 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksUsage[edit] Portuguese[edit] The word is also used in Portuguese folklore, being used to describe beings of a small stature wearing big hats, whistling a mystical song, while walking in the forest (and rendered in English by "goblins", "pixies", "brownies" and "leprechauns")
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Lycanthropy
A werewolf[a] (Old English: werwulf, "man-wolf") or occasionally lycanthrope /ˈlaɪkənˌθroʊp/ (Greek: λυκάνθρωπος lukánthrōpos, "wolf-person") is a mythological or folkloric human with the ability to shapeshift into a wolf (or, especially in modern film, a therianthropic hybrid wolflike creature), either purposely or after being placed under a curse or affliction (often a bite or scratch from another werewolf). Early sources for belief in this ability or affliction, called lycanthropy /laɪˈkænθrəpi/, are Petronius
Petronius
(27–66) and Gervase of Tilbury
Gervase of Tilbury
(1150–1228). The werewolf is a widespread concept in European folklore, existing in many variants, which are related by a common development of a Christian interpretation of underlying European folklore developed during the medieval period
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Ghoul
A ghoul is a demon or monster in Arabian mythology, associated with graveyards and consuming human flesh.[1] The term was first used in English literature in 1786, in William Beckford's Orientalist novel Vathek,[2] which describes the ghūl of Arabic
Arabic
folklore. In modern fiction, the term has often been used for a certain kind of undead monster
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Negritos
The Negrito
Negrito
(/nɪˈɡriːtoʊ/) are several different ethnic groups who inhabit isolated parts of South and Southeast Asia.[1] Their current populations include the Andamanese peoples
Andamanese peoples
of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, the Semang
Semang
and Batek people
Batek people
of Peninsular Malaysia, the Maniq people of Southern Thailand, and the Aeta
Aeta
people, Ati people, and 30 other ethnic groups in the Philippines. The Negrito
Negrito
peoples show strong physical similarities with the pygmy peoples of Africa
Africa
but are genetically closer to their surrounding populations in Austronesia
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Visayan
The Visayans
Visayans
(Visayan: Mga Bisaya; local pronunciation: [mɐˈŋa bisɐˈjaʔ]) is an umbrella term for the Philippine ethnolinguistic groups native to the whole Visayas, to the southernmost islands of Luzon
Luzon
and to most parts of Mindanao. They are speakers of one or more Visayan languages, the most widely spoken being Cebuano, closely followed by Hiligaynon (Ilonggo) and Waray-Waray.[2] Many have, at some point in their lives, migrated to Metro Manila
Metro Manila
out of economic necessity brought about by centralization around it
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Coconut
The coconut tree (Cocos nucifera) is a member of the family Arecaceae (palm family) and the only species of the genus Cocos.[1] The term coconut can refer to the whole coconut palm or the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. The spelling cocoanut is an archaic form of the word.[2] The term is derived from the 16th-century Portuguese and Spanish word coco meaning "head" or "skull", from the three indentations on the coconut shell that resemble facial features.[3] Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics.[4] They form a regular part of the diets of many people in the tropics and subtropics. Coconuts are distinct from other fruits for their endosperm containing a large quantity of water[4] (also called "milk"),[5] and when immature, may be harvested for the potable coconut water
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Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Austronesian Peoples
The Austronesian peoples, or more accurately Austronesian-speaking peoples,[14] is a large group of various peoples in Southeast Asia, Taiwan, Oceania
Oceania
and Madagascar
Madagascar
that speak the Austronesian languages
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Moon
The Moon
The Moon
is an astronomical body that orbits planet Earth, being Earth's only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest natural satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). Following Jupiter's satellite Io, the Moon
Moon
is the second-densest satellite in the Solar System
Solar System
among those whose densities are known. The Moon
The Moon
is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth
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Sun
The Sun
Sun
is the star at the center of the Solar System. It is a nearly perfect sphere of hot plasma,[14][15] with internal convective motion that generates a magnetic field via a dynamo process.[16] It is by far the most important source of energy for life on Earth. Its diameter is about 1.39 million kilometers, i.e. 109 times that of Earth, and its mass is about 330,000 times that of Earth, accounting for about 99.86% of the total mass of the Solar System.[17] About three quarters of the Sun's mass consists of hydrogen (~73%); the rest is mostly helium (~25%), with much smaller quantities of heavier elements, including oxygen, carbon, neon, and iron.[18] The Sun
Sun
is a G-type main-sequence star
G-type main-sequence star
(G2V) based on its spectral class. As such, it is informally referred to as a yellow dwarf
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Deity
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
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Devata
Deva is the Hindu term for deity; however, devata (Devanagari: देवता; Khmer: ទេវតា (tevoda); Javanese, Balinese, Sundanese, Malay and Indonesian: dewata; Batak languages: debata (Toba), dibata (Karo), naibata (Simalungun); Philippine languages: diwata) is a smaller, more focused deva. The term "devata" can also mean deva (pl: devatas, meaning the gods). There are male and female devatas. There are many kinds of devatas: vanadevatas (forest spirits, perhaps descendants of early nature-spirit cults), gramadevata (village gods), devatas of river crossings, caves, mountains, and so on. In Hinduism, the devatas that guard the eight, nine and ten cardinal points are called Lokapala
Lokapala
(Guardians of the Directions) or, more specifically in ancient Java
Java
tradition, Dewata Nawa Sanga (Guardians of Nine Directions)
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Creation Myth
A creation myth (or cosmogonic myth) is a symbolic narrative of how the world began and how people first came to inhabit it.[2][3][4] While in popular usage the term myth often refers to false or fanciful stories, members of cultures often ascribe varying degrees of truth to their creation myths.[5][6] In the society in which it is told, a creation myth is usually regarded as conveying profound truths, metaphorically, symbolically and sometimes in a historical or literal sense.[7][8] They are commonly, although not always, considered cosmogonical myths – that is, they describe the ordering of the cosmos from a state of chaos or amorphousness.[9] Creation myths often share a number of features
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