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Philippe Noiret
Best Actor
Actor
in a Leading Role 1990 Nuovo cinema Paradiso Best Actor 1976 Le Vieux fusil 1990 La Vie et rien d'autre' Philippe Noiret
Philippe Noiret
(French pronunciation: ​[filip nwaʁɛ]; 1 October 1930 – 23 November 2006) was a French film actor.Contents1 Life and career 2 Awards 3 Selected filmography 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Noiret was born in Lille, France, the son of Lucy (Heirman) and Pierre Noiret, a clothing company representative.[1] He was an indifferent scholar and attended several prestigious Paris schools, including the Lycée Janson de Sailly. He failed several times to pass his baccalauréat exams, so he decided to study theater. He trained at the Centre Dramatique de l'Ouest and toured with the Théâtre National Populaire for seven years, where he met Monique Chaumette, whom he married in 1962
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Ted Kotcheff
William Theodore Kotcheff (born Velichko Todorov Tsochev, April 7, 1931) is a Bulgarian-Canadian film and television director and producer,[1] known primarily for his work on several high-profile British and American television
American television
productions such as Armchair Theatre and Law & Order: Special
Special
Victims Unit. He has also directed numerous successful films including the seminal Australian classic Wake in Fright, action films such as First Blood
First Blood
and Uncommon Valor, and comedies like Weekend at Bernie's, Fun with Dick and Jane, and North Dallas Forty. He is sometimes credited as William T
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Jean Racine
Jean Racine
Jean Racine
(French: [ʒɑ̃ ʁasin]), baptismal name Jean-Baptiste Racine (22 December 1639 – 21 April 1699), was a French dramatist, one of the three great playwrights of 17th-century France
France
(along with Molière
Molière
and Corneille), and an important literary figure in the Western tradition
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Joe Leydon
Joseph Patrick Michael "Joe" Leydon (born August 22, 1952) is an American film critic and historian. A critic and correspondent for Variety since 1990, he is the author of Joe Leydon's Guide to Essential Movies You Must See (Michael Wiese Productions) and a contributing critic for Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide. He is also a contributing editor for Cowboys & Indians Magazine. Life and career[edit] Leydon was born in New Orleans, Louisiana and raised in the city's Ninth Ward. He graduated from Loyola University with a degree in Journalism
Journalism
(with a minor in film).[1] At Loyola, he studied under the late Ralph T. Bell. In 2007, he earned a Master of Arts degree at the Jack J. Valenti
Jack J. Valenti
School of Communications at University of Houston. Leydon was a film critic for The Houston Post
Houston Post
from 1982 until the paper’s demise in 1995
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Théophile Gautier
Pierre Jules Théophile Gautier
Théophile Gautier
(French: [pjɛʁ ʒyl teofil ɡotje]; 30 August 1811 – 23 October 1872) was a French poet, dramatist, novelist, journalist, and art and literary critic. While an ardent defender of Romanticism, Gautier's work is difficult to classify and remains a point of reference for many subsequent literary traditions such as Parnassianism, Symbolism, Decadence and Modernism
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Cannes Film Festival
The Cannes
Cannes
Festival (/kæn/; French: Festival de Cannes), named until 2002 as the International Film Festival (Festival international du film) and known in English as the Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France, which previews new films of all genres, including documentaries, from all around the world. Founded in 1946, the invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.[1] On 1 July 2014, co-founder and former head of French pay-TV operator Canal+, Pierre Lescure, took over as President of the Festival, while Thierry Fremaux
Thierry Fremaux
became the General Delegate. The board of directors also appointed Gilles Jacob as Honorary President of the Festival.[2][3] The 2017 Cannes
Cannes
Film Festival, its 70th anniversary, took place between 17 and 29 May 2017
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Georges Franju
Georges Franju
Georges Franju
(French: [fʁɑ̃ʒy]; 12 April 1912 – 5 November 1987) was a French filmmaker. He was born in Fougères, Ille-et-Vilaine.[4]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Film career2 Film style 3 Filmography3.1 As director4 References4.1 Bibliography5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Before working in French cinema, Franju had several different jobs. These included working for an insurance company and a noodle factory. Franju was also briefly in the military in Algeria
Algeria
and was discharged in 1932
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Nord (département)
Nord (French pronunciation: ​[nɔʁ]; English: North; Dutch: Noorderdepartement) is a department in the far north of France. It was created from the western halves of the historical counties of Flanders and Hainaut, and the Bishopric of Cambrai. The modern coat of arms was inherited from the County of Flanders. Nord is the country's most populous department. It also contains the metropolitan region of Lille, the fifth-largest urban area in France after Paris, Lyon, Marseille, and Toulouse
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Sète
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Sète
Sète
(French pronunciation: ​[sɛt]; Seta in Occitan), known as Cette until 1928, is a commune in the Hérault
Hérault
department in the Occitanie
Occitanie
region in southern France. Its inhabitants are called Sétois. Known as the Venice of Languedoc and the singular island (in Paul Valéry's words), it is a port and a seaside resort on the Mediterranean with its own very strong cultural identity, traditions, cuisine and dialect
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Bowl Cut
A bowl cut, or bowl haircut, is a simple, plain, and short haircut where the hair is cut with a straight fringe on the front and the rest of the hair is the same length all the way around or is cut short on the sides and back.[1] It is so named because it looks as though someone were to place a bowl on the head and cut off or trim all of the hair to a very short length.[1] A bowl cut is also known for being a cheap and easy haircut often sported by children, typically in less developed countries worldwide. History[edit]Detail of a 1920s Soviet Ukrainian posterHistorically, the bowl haircut was popular among common people of various nationalities as an easy and relatively neat cut by a non-professional.[1] Indeed, it was done by putting a cooking pot of a fit size to the level of the ears, and all hair below the rim was cut or shaved off. In some cultures it was a normal type of haircut
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Everyman
In literature and drama, the term everyman has come to mean an ordinary individual[1][2] with whom the audience or reader is supposed to be able to identify easily and who is often placed in extraordinary circumstances.Contents1 Description 2 Uses 3 Examples3.1 In fiction 3.2 In non-fiction4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The name derives from a 15th-century English morality play called Everyman.[2] The contemporary everyman differs from his (or her) medieval counterpart in many respects. While the medieval everyman was devoid of definite marks of individuality in order to create a universality in the moral message of the play, the contemporary storyteller may use an everyman for amoral, immoral, or demonstrative purposes.[citation needed] Uses[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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André Téchiné
André Téchiné
André Téchiné
(French: [teʃine]; born 13 March 1943) is a French screenwriter and film director
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Gigi (1949 Film)
Gigi is a 1949 French comedy film directed by Jacqueline Audry and starring Gaby Morlay, Jean Tissier and Yvonne de Bray.[1] A young lady (Daniélle Delorme) who is coming of age and being trained as a courtesan by her family, and realises she not only adores the debonair, close family friend Gaston, who has spoiled her with attention and care for most of her life (played beautifully by Franck Villard), but that she is in love with him. Gaston realises the same thing, and despite efforts of Gigi´s down-to-earth, doting Grandmother and charming, socialite Aunt to bring the couple together by the then socially accepted practice, it is the undeniable and compelling love between Gigi and Gaston that triumphs above all. Beautifully directed by Jacqueline Audry, who accentuates the brilliant humor of this piece without losing the utterly remarkable sensitivity of the young love that takes center stage
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André Malraux
André Malraux
André Malraux
DSO (French: [ɑ̃dʁe malʁo]; 3 November 1901 – 23 November 1976) was a French novelist, art theorist and Minister of Cultural Affairs. Malraux's novel La Condition Humaine (Man's Fate) (1933) won the Prix Goncourt. He was appointed by President Charles de Gaulle as Minister of Information (1945–46) and subsequently as France's first Minister of Cultural Affairs during de Gaulle's presidency (1959–69).Contents1 Early years 2 Career2.1 Early years 2.2 Indochina 2.3 The Asian novels 2.4 Searching for Lost Cities 2.5 Spanish Civil War 2.6 World War II 2.7 After the war 2.8 Legacy and honours3 Bibliography 4 Exhibitions 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Malraux was born in Paris in 1901, the son of Fernand-Georges Malraux and Berthe Lamy (Malraux). His parents separated in 1905 and eventually divorced
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Michel Debré
World War II :Operation Torch Operation Overlord Operation DragoonMichel Jean-Pierre Debré[1] (French pronunciation: ​[miʃɛl dəbʁe]; 15 January 1912 – 2 August 1996) was the first Prime Minister of the French Fifth Republic. He is considered the "father" of the current Constitution of France. He served under President Charles de Gaulle
Charles de Gaulle
from 1959 to 1962. In terms of political personality, he was intense and immovable, with a tendency to rhetorical extremism.[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Career 1.3 Family2 Government2.1 Politics in Réunion3 Political career3.1 Debré's Government, 8 January 1959 – 15 April 19624 References 5 Further reading5.1 Primary sourcesBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Debré was born in Paris, the son of Robert Debré, the well-known Jewish professor of medicine, who is today considered by many to be the founder of modern pediatrics
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Charles De Gaulle
Charles André Joseph Marie de Gaulle (French: [ʃaʁl də ɡol] ( listen); 22 November 1890 – 9 November 1970) was a French general and statesman who led the French Resistance
French Resistance
against Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in World War II
World War II
and chaired the Provisional Government of the French Republic from 1944 to 1946 in order to reestablish democracy in France. In 1958, he came out of retirement when appointed Prime Minister of France
Prime Minister of France
by President René Coty. He was asked to rewrite the Constitution of France
France
and founded the Fifth Republic after approval by referendum. He was elected President of France
President of France
later that year, a position he was reelected to in 1965 and held until his resignation in 1969. He twice served as ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra
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