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Phi Beta Sigma
Phi Beta Sigma
Phi Beta Sigma
(ΦΒΣ) is a social/service collegiate and professional fraternity founded at Howard University
Howard University
in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students with nine other Howard students as charter members. The fraternity's founders, Abram Langston Taylor, Leonard Frances Morse, and Charles Ignatius Brown, wanted to organize a Greek letter fraternity that would exemplify the ideals of Brotherhood, Scholarship and Service while taking an inclusive perspective to serving the community as opposed to having an exclusive purpose
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Selma To Montgomery Marches
DCVL membersUlysses S. Blackmon, Sr. Amelia Boynton Samuel Boynton Bruce Boynton Joseph Ellwanger Rev. Frederick Reese Rev. L.L. Anderson J. L. Chestnut Annie Lee Cooper Marie Foster James E. GildersleeveSCLC membersMartin Luther King, Jr. James Bevel Diane Nash James Orange Hosea Williams SNCC
SNCC
membersStokely Carmichael James Forman Prathia Hall Bernard Lafayette[1] John Lewis Fay Bellamy PowellState of AlabamaGeorge Wallace, Governor Albert J. Lingo, Director of the Alabama Department of Public Safety Major John Cloud, Commander of Alabama State TroopersDallas CountyJudge James Hare, Circuit Court Jim Clark, Sheriff of Dallas County J. P
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Railway Labor Act
The Railway Labor Act is a United States federal law
United States federal law
on US labor law that governs labor relations in the railroad and airline industries. The Act, passed in 1926 and amended in 1934 and 1936, seeks to substitute bargaining, arbitration and mediation for strikes to resolve labor disputes
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A. Philip Randolph
Asa Philip Randolph[1] (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, the American labor movement, and socialist political parties. In 1925, he organized and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first predominantly African-American labor union. In the early Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and the Labor Movement, Randolph was a voice that would not be silenced. His continuous agitation with the support of fellow labor rights activists against unfair labor practices in relation to people of color eventually led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802
Executive Order 8802
in 1941, banning discrimination in the defense industries during World War II. The group then successfully pressured President Harry S. Truman
Harry S

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Harlem
Coordinates: 40°48′32.52″N 73°56′54.14″W / 40.8090333°N 73.9483722°W / 40.8090333; -73.9483722HarlemNeighborhood of ManhattanStately Harlem
Harlem
apartment buildings adjacent to Morningside ParkNickname(s): "Heaven", "Black mecca"Motto(s): "Making It!"Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New YorkCity  New YorkFounded 1658Named for Haarlem, NetherlandsArea[1] • Total 10.03 km2 (3.871 sq mi)Population (2000)[2][3][4] • Total 335,109 • Density 33,000/km2 (87,000/sq mi)EconomicsZIP Codes 10026–10027, 10029–10031, 10035, 10037, 10039Area codes 212, 917, 646, 347 Harlem
Harlem
is a large neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City
City
borough of Manhattan
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Atlanta
Atlanta
Atlanta
(/ætˈlæntə/) is the capital and most populous city of the state of Georgia in the United States. With an estimated 2016 population of 472,522,[12] it is the cultural and economic center of the Atlanta
Atlanta
metropolitan area, home to 5.8 million people and the ninth-largest metropolitan area in the United States.[6] Atlanta
Atlanta
is the seat of Fulton County and a small portion of the city extends eastward into DeKalb County. Atlanta
Atlanta
was founded as a transportation hub at the intersection of two railroad lines in 1837. After being mostly burned to the ground during the American Civil War, the city rose from its ashes to become a national center of commerce and the unofficial capital of the "New South". During the 1960s, Atlanta
Atlanta
became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr
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Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville (/ˈluːəvəl/ ( listen) LOO-ə-vəl, /ˈlʊvəl/ ( listen) LUUV-əl or /ˈluːiːvɪl/ ( listen)) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky
Kentucky
and the 29th-most populous city in the United States.[d][5] It is one of two cities in Kentucky
Kentucky
designated as first-class, the other being the state's second-largest city of Lexington.[e] Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County. Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark
George Rogers Clark
and is named after King Louis XVI of France, making Louisville one of the oldest cities west of the Appalachian Mountains. Sited beside the Falls of the Ohio, the only major obstruction to river traffic between the upper Ohio River
Ohio River
and the Gulf of Mexico, the settlement first grew as a portage site
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Human Branding
Human branding
Human branding
or stigmatizing is the process which a mark, usually a symbol or ornamental pattern, is burned into the skin of a living person, with the intention that the resulting scar makes it permanent. This is performed using a hot or very cold branding iron. It therefore uses the physical techniques of livestock branding on a human, either with consent as a form of body modification; or under coercion, as a punishment or to identify an enslaved or otherwise oppressed person. It may also be practiced as a "rite of passage", e.g
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Carter G. Woodson
Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950)[1] was an American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. He was one of the first scholars to study African-American history
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Wall Street Crash Of 1929
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Crash of 1929, also known as Black Tuesday (October 29),[1] the Great Crash, or the Stock
Stock
Market Crash of 1929, began on October 24, 1929 ("Black Thursday"), and was the most devastating stock market crash in the hist
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Tuskegee, Alabama
Tuskegee (/tʌsˈkiːɡiː/[3]) is a city in Macon County, Alabama, United States. It was founded and laid out in 1833 by General Thomas Simpson Woodward, a Creek War
Creek War
veteran under Andrew Jackson, and made the county seat that year. It was incorporated in 1843.[4] It is also the largest city in Macon County. At the 2010 census the population was 9,865, down from 11,846 in 2000. Tuskegee has been an important site in African-American
African-American
history and highly influential in United States history since the 19th century. Before the American Civil War, the area was largely used as a cotton plantation, dependent on African-American
African-American
slave labor. After the war, many freedmen continued to work on plantations in the rural area, which was devoted to agriculture
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Brotherhood Of Sleeping Car Porters
The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
(BSCP) was, in 1925, the first labor organization led by African Americans to receive a charter in the American Federation of Labor
American Federation of Labor
(AFL). It merged in 1978 with the Brotherhood of Railway and Airline Clerks (BRAC), now known as the Transportation Communications International Union. The leaders of the BSCP—including A. Philip Randolph, its founder and first president, and C. L. Dellums, its vice president and second president—became leaders in the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and continued to play a significant role in it after it focused on the eradication of segregation in the Southern United States. BSCP members such as E. D
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National Negro Congress
The National Negro Congress (NNC) (1935–ca. 1946) was formed in 1935 at Howard University
Howard University
as a broadly based organization with the goal of fighting for Black liberation; it was the successor to the League of Struggle for Negro Rights, both affiliated with the Communist Party. During the Great Depression, the party worked in the United States to unite black and white workers and intellectuals in the fight for racial justice. This period represented the Party's peak of prestige in African-American communities. NNC was opposed to war, fascism, and discrimination, especially racial discrimination. During the Great Depression era, a majority of Americans faced immense economic problems. Many lost their jobs and as a result, were forced to live at the margins of society
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Morris Brown College
Morris Brown
Morris Brown
College (MBC) is a private, coed, liberal arts college in the Vine City community of Atlanta, Georgia, United States. It is a historically black college affiliated with the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Although Morris Brown
Morris Brown
College is no longer a member of the Atlanta
Atlanta
University Center Consortium, it is located within the Atlanta
Atlanta
University Center (a district designated by the Atlanta
Atlanta
City Council). In 2002 it lost its accreditation and federal funding due to a financial mismanagement scandal during the 1998–2002 tenure of Dolores Cross as school president
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Franklin D. Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Committee On Fair Employment Practice
The Fair Employment Practice Committee
Fair Employment Practice Committee
(FEPC) was created in 1941 in the United States to implement Executive Order 8802
Executive Order 8802
by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, "banning discriminatory employment practices by Federal agencies and all unions and companies engaged in war-related work."[1] This was shortly before the United States entered World War II. The EO also required Federal vocational and training programs to be administered without discrimination. Established in the Office of Production Management, the FEPC was intended to help African Americans and other minorities obtain jobs in the homefront industry during World War II
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