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Peter Lougheed
Edgar Peter Lougheed, PC CC AOE QC, (/ˈlɑːhiːd/ LAW-heed; July 26, 1928 – September 13, 2012) was a Canadian lawyer and politician. He served as the tenth Premier of Alberta
Premier of Alberta
from 1971-85 as a Progressive Conservative. Lougheed was the grandson of Sir James Alexander Lougheed, an early senator and prominent Alberta
Alberta
businessman. After a short football career he entered business and practised law in Calgary. In 1965, he was elected leader of the Progressive Conservatives, a party that at the time had no seats in the legislature. He led the party back into the legislature in the 1967 provincial election
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The Honourable
The prefix The Honourable or The Honorable (abbreviated to The Hon., Hon. or formerly The Hon'ble—the latter term is still used in South Asia) is a style that is used before the names of certain classes of people. It is considered to be an honorific styling, and it is only used for living people. American protocol expert Robert Hickey says, "The courtesy title The Honorable is used when addressing or listing the name of a living person. When the name of a deceased person is listed it is just (Full Name) + Office Held."[1] The 2016 Bloomsbury guide to titles and forms of address states that the title 'honourable' in English speaking countries is "held for life or during tenure of office."[2] The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage by Allan M. Siegal (1999), p
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Alberta General Election, 1935
Richard G. Reid United FarmersPremier-designate William Aberhart Social CreditThe Alberta
Alberta
general election of 1935 was the eighth general election for the Province of Alberta, Canada. It was held on August 22, 1935, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta. The newly founded Social Credit Party of Alberta
Alberta
won a sweeping victory, unseating the 14-year government of the United Farmers of Alberta. It was one of only four times that Alberta
Alberta
has changed governments. Premier John E. Brownlee had resigned on July 10, 1934, when he was sued and found liable for the seduction of a young clerk working in the Attorney-General's office. Although the verdict was immediately set aside by the presiding judge, the scandal seriously damaged the UFA's reputation among socially conservative Albertans. Provincial Treasurer Richard G. Reid
Richard G

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Queen's Privy Council For Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
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Liberal Party Of Canada
The Liberal Party of Canada
Canada
(French: Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the Grits, is the oldest federal political party in Canada
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Canadians
Canadians
Canadians
(French: Canadiens / Canadiennes) are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical, or cultural. For most Canadians, several (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian. Canada
Canada
is a multilingual and multicultural society home to people of many different ethnic, religious and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World
Old World
immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization, different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Winter Olympics
The Winter Olympic Games
Olympic Games
(French: Jeux olympiques d'hiver)[nb 1] is a major international sporting event held once every four years for sports practised on snow and ice. The first Winter Olympics, the 1924 Winter Olympics, were held in Chamonix, France. The modern Olympic games were inspired by the ancient Olympic Games, which were held in Olympia, Greece, from the 8th century BC to the 4th century AD. Baron Pierre de Coubertin
Pierre de Coubertin
founded the International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
(IOC) in 1894, leading to the first modern Summer Games in Athens, Greece in 1896
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Chancellor (education)
A chancellor is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the vice-chancellor, who may carry an additional title, such as "president & vice-chancellor". The chancellor may serve as chairman of the governing body; if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector. In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S
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Institute For Research On Public Policy
The Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP) is an independent, national, bilingual, not-for-profit organization based in Montreal. Its mission is to “improve public policy by generating analysis and informed debate on current and emerging issues facing Canadians and their governments.” It publishes peer-reviewed research and acts as a convenor of policy debates by organizing conferences, round tables and panel discussions among stakeholders, academics, policy-makers and the general public
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Cabinet Of Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
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Senate Of Canada
The Senate of Canada
Canada
(French: Sénat du Canada) is a component of the Parliament of Canada, along with the House of Commons and the Monarch (represented by the Governor General). The Senate is modelled after the British House of Lords
House of Lords
and consists of 105 members appointed by the Governor General on the advice of the Prime Minister.[1] Seats are assigned on a regional basis: four regions—defined as Ontario, Quebec, the Maritime provinces, and the Western provinces—each receive 24 seats, with the remaining portions of the country— Newfoundland and Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador
and the three northern territories—assigned the remaining nine seats apart from these regional divisions. Senators may serve until they reach the age of 75. The Senate is the upper house of Parliament and the House of Commons is the lower house
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Legislative Assembly Of Alberta
Government     New Democratic (54)Official Opposition:     United Conservative (25)Other Parties:     Alberta Party
Alberta Party
(3)      Liberal (1)      Progressive Conservative (1)      Independent (1)      Vacant (2)ElectionsLast electionMay 5, 2015Next electionMay 31, 2019 or earlierMeeting place
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Students' Union
A students' union, student government, free student union, student senate, students' association, guild of students, or government of student body is a student organization present in many colleges, universities, and high schools. In higher education, the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social, organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership. In the United States, student union often only refers to a physical building owned by the university with the purpose of providing services for students without a governing body. This building is also referred to as a student activity center, although the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has hundreds of campus organizational members
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