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Peter Lougheed
EDGAR PETER LOUGHEED, PC CC AOE QC , (/ˈlɑːhiːd/ LAW-heed ; July 26, 1928 – September 13, 2012) was a Canadian lawyer and politician. He served as the tenth Premier of Alberta from 1971 to 1985 as a Progressive Conservative . Lougheed was the grandson of Sir James Alexander Lougheed , an early senator and prominent Alberta
Alberta
businessman. After a short football career he entered business and practised law in Calgary. In 1965, he was elected leader of the Progressive Conservatives, a party that at the time had no seats in the legislature. He led the party back into the legislature in the 1967 provincial election . Four years later , the Tories won power with 49 of the 75 seats in the legislature, defeating the Social Credit Party which had governed the province since the 1935 election
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Alberta General Election, 1935
Richard G. Reid United Farmers PREMIER-DESIGNATE William Aberhart Social Credit The ALBERTA GENERAL ELECTION OF 1935 was the eighth general election for the Province of Alberta
Alberta
, Canada
Canada
. It was held on August 22, 1935 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
Alberta
. The newly founded Social Credit Party of Alberta
Alberta
won a sweeping victory, unseating the 14-year government of the United Farmers of Alberta
Alberta
. It was one of only four times that Alberta
Alberta
has changed governments. Premier John E. Brownlee had resigned on July 10, 1934 when he was sued and found liable for the seduction of a young clerk working in the Attorney-General's office
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Canadian Football
CANADIAN FOOTBALL (French : _ Football canadien_) is a form of gridiron football played in Canada in which two teams of 12 players each compete for territorial control of a field of play 110 yards (101 m) long and 65 yards (59 m) wide attempting to advance a pointed prolate spheroid ball into the opposing team's scoring area (end zone ). In Canada, the term "FOOTBALL" may refer to Canadian football and American football collectively, or to either sport specifically, depending on context. The two sports have shared origins and are closely related but have significant differences . Rugby football in Canada originated in the early 1860s, and over time, the game known as Canadian football developed
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The Honourable
The prefix THE HONOURABLE or THE HONORABLE (abbreviated to THE HON., HON. or formerly THE HON\'BLE—the latter term is still used in South Asia) is a style that is used before the names of certain classes of people. It is considered to be an honorific styling, and it is only used for living people. Protocol expert Robert Hickey says, "The courtesy title the Honorable is used when addressing or listing the name of a living person
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Canadians
Canadian English and Canadian French Numerous indigenous languages are also recognized. Various other languages . RELIGION Multiple denominations CANADIANS (French : _Canadiens / Canadiennes_) are people identified with the country of Canada . This connection may be residential, legal, historical, or cultural. For most Canadians, several (or all) of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being _Canadian_. Canada is a bilingual and multicultural society home to people of many different ethnic, religious and national origins, with the majority of the population made up of Old World immigrants and their descendants. Following the initial period of French and then the much larger British colonization , different waves (or peaks) of immigration and settlement of non-indigenous peoples took place over the course of nearly two centuries and continue today
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Alma Mater
ALMA MATER ( Latin : _alma_ "nourishing/kind", _mater_ "mother"; pl. _almae matres_) is an allegorical Latin phrase for a university or college . In modern usage, it is a school or university which an individual has attended, or a song or hymn associated with a school . The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students. Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its modern usage, _Alma mater_ was an honorific title for various Latin mother goddesses , especially Ceres or Cybele , and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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Great Depression
The GREAT DEPRESSION was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place during the 1930s. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until 1941. It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century. In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline. The depression originated in the United States
United States
, after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday
Black Tuesday
). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%. By comparison, worldwide GDP fell by less than 1% from 2008 to 2009 during the Great Recession
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Students' Union
A STUDENTS\' UNION, STUDENT GOVERNMENT, FREE STUDENT UNION, STUDENT SENATE, STUDENTS\' ASSOCIATION, GUILD OF STUDENTS, or GOVERNMENT OF STUDENT BODY is a student organization present in many colleges , universities , and high schools . In higher education , the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus , dedicated to social , organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership. In the United States, student union often only refers to a physical building owned by the university with the purpose of providing services for students without a governing body. This building is also referred to as a student activity center , although the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has hundreds of campus organizational members. Outside the US, student union and students' union refer to a representative body, as distinct from a student activity centre
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Liberal Party Of Canada
The LIBERAL PARTY OF CANADA (French : Parti libéral du Canada), colloquially known as the GRITS, is the oldest federal political party in Canada
Canada
. The party espouses the principles of liberalism and generally sits at the centre of the Canadian political spectrum. The Liberal Party is traditionally positioned to the left of the Conservative Party of Canada
Canada
and to the right of the New Democratic Party (NDP). The party has dominated federal politics for much of Canada's history, holding power for almost 69 years in the 20th century—more than any other party in a developed country —and as a result, it is sometimes referred to as Canada's "natural governing party "
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Cabinet Of Canada
Provincial and territorial executive councils Premiers Legislative ( Queen-in-Parliament ) Federal parliament Senate Speaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisions House of Commons Speaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty\'s Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinet Provincial and territorial parliaments Judicial (Queen-on-the-Bench ) Court system Supreme court Federal chief justice ( Beverley McLachlin
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Senate Of Canada
The SENATE OF CANADA (French : _Sénat du Canada_) is a component of the Parliament of Canada , along with the House of Commons and the Monarch (represented by the Governor General ). The Senate is modelled after the British House of Lords and consists of 105 members appointed by the Governor General on the advice of the Prime Minister . Seats are assigned on a regional basis: four regions—defined as Ontario , Quebec , the Maritime provinces , and the Western provinces —each receive 24 seats, with the remaining portions of the country— Newfoundland and Labrador and the three northern territories —assigned the remaining 9 seats apart from these regional divisions. Senators may serve until they reach the age of 75. The Senate is the upper house of Parliament and the House of Commons is the lower house
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Institute For Research On Public Policy
THE INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH ON PUBLIC POLICY (IRPP) is one of Canada 's oldest nonpartisan public policy think tanks . It is an independent, national, bilingual, not-for-profit organization. The IRPP's inception was sparked by a proposal by prime minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau in 1968 for the establishment of an "independent and autonomous" institute for public policy research, whose work would be "available to all governments". The Institute was founded in 1972 and is based in Montreal
Montreal
. Graham Fox is the current President and CEO, and Graham W.S. Scott is the current Chair of the Board of Directors. The IRPP publishes Policy Options magazine, currently edited by Jennifer Ditchburn; IRPP Studies; IRPP Insights; and Policy Horizons. In addition, the IRPP initiates and publishes peer-reviewed research, and organizes policy-focused conferences, roundtables, and events. The IRPP has been described as an "information broker"
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Chancellor (education)
A CHANCELLOR is a leader of a college or university, usually either the executive or ceremonial head of the university or of a university campus. In most Commonwealth and former Commonwealth nations, the chancellor is usually a ceremonial non-resident head of the university. In such institutions, the chief executive of a university is the VICE-CHANCELLOR, who may carry an additional title, such as "president if not, this duty is often held by a chairman who may be known as a pro-chancellor. In many countries, the administrative and educational head of the university is known as the president, principal or rector . In the United States, the head of a university is most commonly a university president. In U.S. university systems that have more than one affiliated university or campus, the executive head of a specific campus may have the title of chancellor and report to the overall system's president, or vice versa
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Winter Olympics
The OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES (official name) (French: _Jeux olympiques d'hiver_) is a major international sporting event that occurs once every four years. Unlike the Summer Olympics, the Winter Olympics feature sports practised on snow and ice. The first Winter Olympics, the 1924 Winter Olympics , was held in Chamonix , France. The original five sports (broken into nine disciplines) were bobsleigh , curling , ice hockey , Nordic skiing (consisting of the disciplines military patrol , cross-country skiing , Nordic combined , and ski jumping ), and skating (consisting of the disciplines figure skating and speed skating ). The Games were held every four years from 1924 until 1936, after which they were interrupted by World War II . The Olympics resumed in 1948 and was again held every four years
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Bachelor Of Arts
A BACHELOR OF ARTS (B.A., or A.B. from the Latin _artium baccalaureus_ or _baccalaureus artium_) is a bachelor\'s degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts , sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors. The word _baccalaureus_ (from the Latin _bacca_, a berry, and _laureus_, "of the bay laurel ") should not be confused with _baccalaureatus_ (translatable as "gold-plated scepter" by using the Latina _bacum_ and _aureatus_), which refers to the one- to two-year postgraduate _Bachelor of Arts with Honors _ degree (_Baccalaureatus in Artibus Cum Honore_) in some countries
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Harvard University
HARVARD UNIVERSITY is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts , established in 1636, whose history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities. Established originally by the Massachusetts legislature and soon thereafter named for John Harvard (its first benefactor), Harvard is the United States\' oldest institution of higher learning , and the Harvard Corporation (formally, the _President and Fellows of Harvard College_) is its first chartered corporation . Although never formally affiliated with any denomination , the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites . Following the American Civil War , President Charles W
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