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Persecution Of Sufis
Persecution of Sufis
Persecution of Sufis
and Sufism
Sufism
has included destruction of Sufi shrines and mosques, suppression of orders, murder, and discrimination against adherents in a number of Muslim-majority countries. The Turkish Republican state banned all Sufi orders and abolished their institutions in 1925 after Sufis opposed the new secular order
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Freedom Of Religion In Russia
The constitution provides for freedom of religion, and the Government generally respected this right in practice; however, in some cases authorities imposed restrictions on certain groups. Although the constitution provides for the equality of all religions before the law and the separation of church and state, the Government did not always respect these provisions. The Russian government has a number of laws against religious extremism and foreign funding of non-government organizations including the Yarovaya Law, that can be used to restrict the practices of religious minorities, such as evangelism or the importation of foreign religious literature
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Freedom Of Religion In Afghanistan
Freedom of religion in Afghanistan
Afghanistan
has changed in recent years because the current government of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
has only been in place since 2002, following a U.S.-led invasion which displaced the former Taliban government. The Constitution of Afghanistan
Afghanistan
is dated January 23, 2004, and its initial three articles mandate: Afghanistan
Afghanistan
shall be an Islamic Republic, independent, unitary, and indivisible state. The sacred religion of Islam
Islam
shall be the religion of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
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Freedom Of Religion In Canada
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Freedom Of Religion In Mongolia
The Constitution of Mongolia
Constitution of Mongolia
provides for freedom of religion, and the Mongolian Government generally respects this right in practice; however, the law somewhat limits proselytism, and some religious groups have faced bureaucratic harassment or been denied registration. There have been few reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice.Contents1 Religious demography 2 Status of religious freedom2.1 Legal and policy framework3 Restrictions on religious freedom 4 Societal abuses and discrimination 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 ReferencesReligious demography[edit] The country has an area of 604,247 square miles (1,564,990 km2) and a population of 3.1 million
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Freedom Of Religion In The Maldives
The 1997 Constitution of the Maldives
Constitution of the Maldives
designates Islam
Islam
as the official state religion. The Government interprets this provision to impose a requirement that all citizens must be Muslims, and as such Freedom of religion in the Maldives
Maldives
is formally non-existent. The law prohibits the practice by Maldivian citizens of any religion other than Islam, and the Constitution precludes non-Muslims from voting, obtaining citizenship, and holding public positions. The president, who is required to be a Sunni Muslim, is the "supreme authority to propagate the tenets of Islam." Government regulations are based on Islamic law. Non-Muslim foreigners are prohibited from worshiping publicly, or from encouraging local citizens to participate in any other religion. Only certified Muslim scholars can give fatawa
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Freedom Of Religion In Malaysia
Freedom of religion is enshrined in the Malaysian Constitution. First, Article 11 provides that every person has the right to profess and to practice his or her religion and (subject to applicable laws restricting the propagation of other religions to Muslims) to propagate it. Second, the Constitution also provides that Islam
Islam
is the religion of the country but other religions may be practised in peace and harmony (Article 3). The status of freedom of religion in Malaysia
Malaysia
is a controversial issue. Questions including whether Malaysia
Malaysia
is an Islamic state
Islamic state
or secular state remains unresolved
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Freedom Of Religion In Laos
The Constitution provides for freedom of religion; however, the Government restricted this right in practice. Some government officials committed abuses of citizens' religious freedom. During the period covered by this report, the overall status of respect for religious freedom did not significantly change. While respect for non-Protestant groups appeared to improve slightly, respect for Protestant groups appeared to decline in several parts of the country. In most areas, officials generally respected the constitutionally guaranteed rights of members of most faiths to worship, albeit within strict constraints imposed by the Government. Authorities in some areas continued to display intolerance for minority religious practice especially by Protestant Christians. The Lao Front for National Construction (LFNC), a popular front organization for the Lao People's Revolutionary Party (LPRP), was responsible for oversight of religious practice
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Freedom Of Religion In Kazakhstan
The Constitution of Kazakhstan
Constitution of Kazakhstan
provides for freedom of religion, and the various religious communities worship largely without government interference. Local officials attempt on occasion to limit the practice of religion by some nontraditional groups; however, higher-level officials or courts occasionally intervene to correct such attempts. The government's enforcement of previously amended laws led to increased problems for some unregistered groups. As of 2007[update], the law on religion continues to impose mandatory registration requirements on missionaries and religious organizations. Most religious groups, including those of minority and nontraditional denominations, reported that the religion laws did not materially affect religious activities. Unregistered religious groups experienced an increase in the level of fines imposed for nonregistration in addition to stronger efforts to collect such fines
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Freedom Of Religion In Japan
The Article 20 of the Japanese Constitution provides for freedom of religion in Japan, and the government generally respects this right in practice.Contents1 Religious demography 2 Status of religious freedom2.1 Legal and policy framework 2.2 Restrictions on religious freedom 2.3 Forced religious conversion 2.4 Other cases3 Societal abuses and discrimination 4 See also 5 ReferencesReligious demography[edit] Main article: Religion in Japan The government of Japan
Japan
does not require religious groups to report their membership, so it was difficult to accurately determine the number of adherents to different religious groups. The Agency for Cultural Affairs reported in 2005 that membership claims by religious groups totaled 211 million
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Freedom Of Religion In Nepal
Nepal
Nepal
is a secular state under the Interim Constitution, which was promulgated on January 15, 2007. The Interim Constitution provides for freedom to practice one's religion. The Interim Constitution also specifically denies the right to convert another person. The now-defunct constitution of 1990, which was in effect until January 15, 2007, described the country as a " Hindu
Hindu
Kingdom," although it did not establish Hinduism as the state religion. The Government generally did not interfere with the practice of other religious groups, and religious tolerance was broadly observed; however, there were some restrictions. The Government took positive preliminary steps with respect to religious freedom during the period covered by this report, and government policy contributed to the generally free practice of religion
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Freedom Of Religion In Indonesia
The Indonesian constitution provides for freedom of religion. The government generally respects religious freedom for the six officially recognized religions: Islam, Protestantism, Catholicism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism
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Freedom Of Religion In Bangladesh
Bangladesh
Bangladesh
is a secular country and freedom of religion is guaranteed by constitution. The major religion in Bangladesh
Bangladesh
is Islam (90%), but a significant percentage of the population adheres to Hinduism (9%).[1] Other religious groups include Buddhists (0.6%, mostly Theravada), Christians (0.3%, mostly Roman Catholics), and Animists (0.1%).[note 1] Bangladesh
Bangladesh
was founded as a secular state, but Islam was made the state religion in the 1980s
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Freedom Of Religion In Bhutan
The Bhutanese Constitution of 2008 and previous law provide for freedom of religion in Bhutan; however, the government has limited non- Buddhist
Buddhist
missionary activity, barring non- Buddhist
Buddhist
missionaries from entering the country, limiting construction of non-Buddhist religious buildings, and restricting the celebration of some non- Buddhist
Buddhist
religious festivals. Drukpa Kagyu
Drukpa Kagyu
(Mahayana) Buddhism
Buddhism
is the state religion, although in the southern areas many citizens openly practice Hinduism. Since the year 2015 Hinduism
Hinduism
is also considered as the national religion of country
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Freedom Of Religion In Brunei
The Constitution states, "The religion of Brunei
Brunei
Darussalam shall be the Muslim
Muslim
religion according to the Shafi'i
Shafi'i
sect of that religion: Provided that all other religions may be practiced in peace and harmony by the person professing them in any part of Brunei Darussalam." However, the Government imposed many restrictions on non- Shafi'i
Shafi'i
and non-Islamic religious practice. There was no change in the status of respect for religious freedom by the Government during the period covered by this report. Practitioners of non- Muslim
Muslim
faiths are not allowed to proselytize. All private schools offer voluntary Islamic instruction to Muslim
Muslim
students, and all post-secondary students are required to attend courses on the national Malay Muslim
Muslim
Monarchy ideology
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Freedom Of Religion In Cambodia
The Constitution
Constitution
provides for freedom of religion, and the government generally respected this right in practice. Buddhism
Buddhism
is the state religion. There was no change in the status of respect for religious freedom by the government during the period covered by this report, and government policy continued to contribute to the generally free practice of religion. There were limited reports of societal abuses or discrimination based on religious belief or practice.Contents1 Religious demography 2 Status of religious freedom2.1 Legal and policy framework 2.2 Restrictions on religious freedom 2.3 Forced religious conversion3 Societal abuses and discrimination 4 See also 5 ReferencesReligious demography[edit] Main article: Religion in Cambodia The country has an area of 67,000 square miles (170,000 km2), and a population of approximately 14.1 million
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