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Perpetual Union
The Perpetual Union
Perpetual Union
is a feature of the Articles of Confederation
Articles of Confederation
and Perpetual Union, which established the United States
United States
of America as a national entity. Under modern American constitutional law, this concept means that U.S. states are not permitted to overthrow the U.S. Constitution and withdraw from the Union.Contents1 Historical origins 2 Significance 3 Constitutional basis 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistorical origins[edit] The concept of a Union of the American States originated gradually during the 1770s as the struggle for independence unfolded. In his first inaugural address on March 4, 1861, Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
stated:The Union is much older than the Constitution. It was formed, in fact, by the Articles of Association in 1774. It was matured and continued by the Declaration of Independence in 1776
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Ninth Amendment To The United States Constitution
The Ninth Amendment (Amendment IX) to the United States Constitution addresses rights, retained by the people, that are not specifically enumerated in the Constitution. It is part of the Bill of Rights.Contents1 Text 2 Background before adoption 3 Judicial interpretation 4 Scholarly interpretation 5 Recapitulation 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 Further reading8.1 Books 8.2 Articles9 External linksText[edit] The amendment as proposed by Congress in 1789 reads as follows:The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.[1]The hand-written copy of the proposed Bill of Rights, 1789, cropped to just show the text that would later be ratified as the Ninth AmendmentBackground before adoption[edit] When the U.S. Constitution was put to the states for ratification after being signed on September 17, 1787, the Anti-Federalists argued that a Bill of Rights should be added
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Article Four Of The United States Constitution
Article Four of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
outlines the relationship between each state and the others, and the several States and the federal government.Contents1 Section 1: Full faith and credit 2 Section 2: Rights of state citizens; rights of extradition2.1 Clause 1: Privileges and Immunities 2.2 Clause 2: Extradition
Extradition
of fugitives 2.3 Clause 3: Fugitive Slave Clause3 Section 3: New states and federal property3.1 Clause 1: New states 3.2 Clause 2: Property Clause4 Section 4: Obligations of the United States4.1 Clause 1: Republican government 4.2 Clause 2: Protection from invasion and domestic violence5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Further reading 8 External linksSection 1: Full faith and credit[edit] Main article: Full Faith and Credit ClauseFull Faith and Credit shall be given in each State to the public Acts, Records, and judicial Proceedings of every other State
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List Of United States Supreme Court Cases, Volume 74
This is a list of all the United States Supreme Court cases from volume 74 of the United States Reports. This was the 7th volume reported by John William Wallace.Case name Docket no. Date decidedGirard v. Philadelphia 74 U.S. 1 January 18, 1869Banks v. The Mayor 74 U.S. 16 January 18, 1869Bank v. Supervisors 74 U.S. 26 January 18, 1869The Georgia 74 U.S. 32 February 15, 1869Insurance Company v. Tweed 74 U.S. 44 January 25, 1869The China 74 U.S. 53 January 25, 1869Lane County v. Oregon 74 U.S. 71 February 8, 1869Aurora City v. West 74 U.S. 82 January 11, 1869Durant v. Essex Company 74 U.S. 107 February 22, 1869Kendall v. United States 74 U.S. 113 February 1, 1869Cowles v. Mercer County 74 U.S. 118 February 1, 1869Nichols v. United States (1868) 74 U.S. 122 February 15, 1869Lincoln v. Claflin 74 U.S. 132 February 8, 1869Green v. Van Buskirk 74 U.S. 139 February 8, 1869The Siren 74 U.S. 152 February 15, 1869Dorsheimer v. United States 74 U.S
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United States Reports
The United States Reports
United States Reports
are the official record (law reports) of the rulings, orders, case tables (list of every case decided, in alphabetical order both by the name of the petitioner (the losing party in lower courts) and by the name of the respondent (the prevailing party below)), and other proceedings of the Supreme Court of the United States. United States Reports
United States Reports
are printed and bound and are the final version of court opinions and cannot be changed. Opinions of the court in each case, prepended with a headnote prepared by the Reporter of Decisions, and any concurring or dissenting opinions are published sequentially
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Preamble To The United States Constitution
The Preamble
Preamble
to the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
is a brief introductory statement of the Constitution's fundamental purposes and guiding principles
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Article One Of The United States Constitution
Article One of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress
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Article Two Of The United States Constitution
Article Two of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the executive branch of the federal government, which carries out and enforces federal laws
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Article Three Of The United States Constitution
Article Three of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the judicial branch of the federal government
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Article Five Of The United States Constitution
Article Five of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
describes the process whereby the Constitution, the nation's frame of government, may be altered. Altering the Constitution consists of proposing an amendment or amendments and subsequent ratification. Amendments may be proposed either by the Congress with a two-thirds vote in both the House of Representatives and the Senate or by a convention of states called for by two-thirds of the state legislatures.[1] To become part of the Constitution, an amendment must be ratified by either—as determined by Congress—the legislatures of three-quarters of the states or state ratifying conventions in three-quarters of the states.[2] The vote of each state (to either ratify or reject a proposed amendment) carries equal weight, regardless of a state's population or length of time in the Union. Additionally, Article V temporarily shielded certain clauses in Article I from being amended
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Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry
(May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was an American attorney, planter, and orator well known for his declaration to the Second Virginia Convention
Second Virginia Convention
(1775): "Give me liberty, or give me death!" A Founding Father, he served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia, from 1776 to 1779 and from 1784 to 1786. Henry was born in Hanover County, Virginia, and was for the most part educated at home. After an unsuccessful venture running a store, and assisting his father-in-law at Hanover Tavern, Henry became a lawyer through self-study. Beginning his practice in 1760, he soon became prominent though his victory in the Parson's Cause
Parson's Cause
against the Anglican clergy
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Article Six Of The United States Constitution
Article Six of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the laws and treaties of the United States
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Article Seven Of The United States Constitution
Article Seven of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
sets the number of state ratifications necessary in order for the Constitution to take effect and prescribes the method through which the states may ratify it.Contents1 Text 2 Background 3 Ratification 4 Implementation 5 See also 6 External links 7 ReferencesText[edit]The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.[1]Background[edit] On September 20, 1787, three days after its adoption by the Constitutional Convention, the drafted Constitution was submitted to the Congress of the Confederation
Congress of the Confederation
for its endorsement. After eight days of debate, the opposing sides came to the first of many compromises that would define the ratification process
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