HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Percy Bysshe Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley
Shelley
(/ˈpɜːrsi ˈbɪʃ ˈʃɛli/ ( listen);[2] 4 August 1792 – 8 July 1822) was one of the major English Romantic poets, and is regarded by some as among the finest lyric poets in the English language, and one of the most influential. A radical in his poetry as well as in his political and social views, Shelley
Shelley
did not see fame during his lifetime, but recognition for his poetry grew steadily following his death. Shelley
Shelley
was a key member of a close circle of visionary poets and writers that included Lord Byron, Leigh Hunt, Thomas Love Peacock, and his own second wife, Mary
Mary
Shelley, the author of Frankenstein. Shelley
Shelley
is perhaps best known for classic poems such as Ozymandias, Ode to the West Wind, To a Skylark, Music, When Soft Voices Die, The Cloud and The Masque of Anarchy
[...More...]

"Percy Bysshe Shelley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isadora Duncan
Angela Isadora
Isadora
Duncan (May 26, 1877 or May 27, 1878[1] – September 14, 1927) was an American dancer who performed to acclaim throughout Europe. Born in California, she lived in Western Europe
Western Europe
and the Soviet Union from the age of 22 until her death at age 49 or 50, when her scarf became entangled in the wheels and axle of the car in which she was riding.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Work 3 Philosophy and technique 4 Gallery 5 Personal life 6 Later life 7 Death 8 Legacy 9 In popular culture 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEarly life[edit] Isadora
Isadora
Duncan was born in San Francisco, the youngest of the four children of Joseph Charles Duncan (1819–1898), a banker, mining engineer and connoisseur of the arts, and Mary Isadora
Isadora
Gray (1849–1922)
[...More...]

"Isadora Duncan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Leo Tolstoy
Count
Count
Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (/ˈtoʊlstɔɪ, ˈtɒl-/;[1] Russian: Лев Никола́евич Толсто́й, tr. Lev Nikoláyevich Tolstóy, IPA: [lʲef nʲɪkɐˈlaɪvʲɪtɕ tɐlˈstoj] ( listen); 9 September [O.S. 28 August] 1828 – 20 November [O.S. 7 November] 1910), usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time. Born to an aristocratic Russian family in 1828, he is best known for the novels War and Peace
War and Peace
(1869) and Anna Karenina
Anna Karenina
(1877), often cited as pinnacles of realist fiction. He first achieved literary acclaim in his twenties with his semi-autobiographical trilogy, Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth (1852–1856), and Sevastopol Sketches
Sevastopol Sketches
(1855), based upon his experiences in the Crimean War
[...More...]

"Leo Tolstoy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morality
Morality
Morality
(from Latin: mōrālis, lit. 'manner, character, proper behavior') is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.[1] Morality
Morality
can be a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal.[2] Morality
Morality
may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness". Moral philosophy includes moral ontology, which is the origin of morals; and moral epistemology, which is the knowledge of morals. Different systems of expressing morality have been proposed, including deontological ethical systems which adhere to a set of established rules, and normative ethical systems which consider the merits of actions themselves
[...More...]

"Morality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chartism
Chartism
Chartism
was a working-class movement for political reform in Britain that existed from 1838 to 1857. It took its name from the People's Charter of 1838 and was a national protest movement, with particular strongholds of support in Northern England, the East Midlands, the Staffordshire Potteries, the Black Country, and the South Wales Valleys. Support for the movement was at its highest in 1839, 1842, and 1848, when petitions signed by millions of working people were presented to the House of Commons. The strategy employed was to use the scale of support which these petitions and the accompanying mass meetings demonstrated to put pressure on politicians to concede manhood suffrage
[...More...]

"Chartism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sedition
Sedition
Sedition
is overt conduct, such as speech and organization, that tends toward insurrection against the established order. Sedition
Sedition
often includes subversion of a constitution and incitement of discontent towards, or resistance against lawful authority. Sedition
Sedition
may include any commotion, though not aimed at direct and open violence against the laws. Seditious words in writing are seditious libel. A seditionist is one who engages in or promotes the interest of sedition. Typically, sedition is considered a subversive act, and the overt acts that may be prosecutable under sedition laws vary from one legal code to another. Where the history of these legal codes has been traced, there is also a record of the change in the definition of the elements constituting sedition at certain points in history
[...More...]

"Sedition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Blasphemy
Blasphemy
Blasphemy
is the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence to a deity, to religious or holy persons or sacred things, or toward something considered sacred or inviolable.[1][2][3][4] Some religions consider blasphemy to be a religious crime.[5] As of 2012, anti-blasphemy laws existed in 32 countries, while 87 nations had hate speech laws that covered defamation of religion and public expression of hate against a religious group.[6] Anti-blasphemy laws are particularly common in Muslim-majority nations, such as those in the Middle East and North Africa,[6] although they are also present in some
[...More...]

"Blasphemy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Unfinished Work
An unfinished creative work is a painting, novel, musical composition, or other creative work, that has not been brought to a completed state. Its creator may have chosen not to finish it, or may have been prevented from doing so by circumstances outside of their control, such as death. Such pieces are often the subject of speculation as to what the finished piece would have been like had the original creator completed the work. Sometimes artworks are finished by others and released posthumously. Unfinished works have had profound influences on their genres and have inspired others in their own projects. The term can also refer to ongoing work which could eventually be finished (i.e. the creator is still living) and is distinguishable from "incomplete work", which can be a work that was finished but is no longer in its complete form. There are many reasons for work not being completed
[...More...]

"Unfinished Work" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
[...More...]

"Victorian Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pre-Raphaelite
The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
(later known as the Pre-Raphaelites) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, founded in 1848 by William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais
John Everett Millais
and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The three founders were joined by William Michael Rossetti, James Collinson, Frederic George Stephens
Frederic George Stephens
and Thomas Woolner
Thomas Woolner
to form the seven-member "brotherhood"
[...More...]

"Pre-Raphaelite" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dante Gabriel Rossetti
Gabriel Charles Dante
Dante
Rossetti (12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882), generally known as Dante
Dante
Gabriel Rossetti (/ˈdænti ˈɡeɪbriəl rəˈzɛti/),[1] was a British poet, illustrator, painter and translator. He founded the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood
in 1848 with William Holman Hunt
William Holman Hunt
and John Everett Millais. Rossetti was later to be the main inspiration for a second generation of artists and writers influenced by the movement, most notably William Morris
William Morris
and Edward Burne-Jones. His work also influenced the European Symbolists and was a major precursor of the Aesthetic movement. Rossetti's art was characterised by its sensuality and its medieval revivalism. His early poetry was influenced by John Keats
[...More...]

"Dante Gabriel Rossetti" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Percy Shelley (potter)
Percy Shelley (1860 – 1937) was an English potter and a major force in developing Shelley Potteries. He was born in Longton, Staffordshire. He attended Owen’s College, Manchester and then London University, where he gained a B.A. degree. In 1881, he joined his father, Joseph, at Wileman & Co. pottery.[1] Percy had not received any formal training in pottery, but became known first and foremost as a potter and went on to develop the lasting reputation of Shelley China. Wanting to improve the ware that the company was producing and to get a better understanding of the export market, especially America, Percy went to the U.S.A. and visited the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Joseph Shelley father died in June 1896, and Percy took control of the business. To improve the ware he brought in artists and designers who he felt could (and did) change the company
[...More...]

"Percy Shelley (potter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oscar Wilde
Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish poet and playwright. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. He is best remembered for his epigrams and plays, his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, as well as the circumstances of his imprisonment and early death. Wilde's parents were successful Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
intellectuals in Dublin. Their son became fluent in French and German early in life. At university, Wilde read Greats; he proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin, then at Oxford. He became known for his involvement in the rising philosophy of aestheticism, led by two of his tutors, Walter Pater and John Ruskin
[...More...]

"Oscar Wilde" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, he was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism, especially William Wordsworth.[1] He was highly critical of much in Victorian society, especially on the declining status of rural people in Britain, such as those from his native South West England. While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898
[...More...]

"Thomas Hardy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
(26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman
Man and Superman
(1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic
[...More...]

"George Bernard Shaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Karl Marx
Karl Marx[6] (/mɑːrks/;[7] German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈmaɐ̯ks]; 5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Trier
Trier
to a middle-class family, Marx studied law and Hegelian philosophy. Due to his political publications Marx became stateless and lived in exile in London, where he continued to develop his thought in collaboration with German thinker Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
and publish his writings. His best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist
Communist
Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital
[...More...]

"Karl Marx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.