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Penelope Blount, Countess Of Devonshire
Penelope Rich, Lady Rich, later styled Penelope Blount (née Devereux; January 1563[1] – 7 July 1607) was an English court office holder. She served as lady-in-waiting to the queen consort of England, Anne of Denmark. She was the sister of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex
and is traditionally thought to be the inspiration for "Stella" of Sir Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella
Astrophel and Stella
sonnet sequence (published posthumously in 1591).[2][3] She married Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich (later 1st Earl of Warwick) and had a public liaison with Charles Blount, Baron Mountjoy, whom she married in an unlicensed ceremony following her divorce from Rich
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Nicholas Hilliard
Nicholas Hilliard
Nicholas Hilliard
(c. 1547 – 7 January 1619) was an English goldsmith and limner best known for his portrait miniatures of members of the courts of Elizabeth I and James I of England. He mostly painted small oval miniatures, but also some larger cabinet miniatures, up to about ten inches tall, and at least two famous half-length panel portraits of Elizabeth. He enjoyed continuing success as an artist, and continuing financial troubles, for forty-five years
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Thomas Smythe (East India Company)
Sir Thomas Smythe or Smith (c.1558 – 4 September 1625),[1] was an English merchant, politician and colonial administrator. He was the first governor of the East India Company and treasurer of the Virginia Company from 1609 to 1620 until enveloped by scandal.Contents1 Early life 2 Business and Political career 3 Private life 4 Death and legacy 5 Notes 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] The second surviving son of Thomas "Customer" Smythe of Westenhanger Castle in Kent, by his wife Alice, daughter of Sir Andrew Judde. His grandfather, John Smythe of Corsham, Wiltshire, was described as yeoman, haberdasher and clothier, and was High Sheriff of Essex for the year of 1532. His father was also a haberdasher, and was 'customer' of the port of London. He purchased Westenhanger from Sir Thomas Sackville, and other property from Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester
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Dorothy Percy, Countess Of Northumberland
Dorothy Percy (née Devereux), Countess of Northumberland (formerly Perrot, née Devereux; c. 1564 – 3 August 1619) was the younger daughter of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex
Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex
by Lettice Knollys, and the wife of Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland.Contents1 Family 2 Marriage and children 3 In fiction 4 Notes 5 ReferencesFamily[edit] Dorothy was born in about 1564, the daughter of Walter Devereux, 1st Earl of Essex and Lettice Knollys, a lady-in-waiting of Queen Elizabeth I of England. Her paternal grandparents were Sir Richard Devereux and Dorothy Hastings, after whom she was named. Her maternal grandparents were Sir Francis Knollys and Lady Catherine Carey, the daughter of Mary Boleyn, herself the sister of Queen consort Anne Boleyn. Dorothy had an elder sister Penelope Devereux, who was said to have been the inspiration for Sir Philip Sidney's sonnet sequence Astrophel and Stella
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Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl Of Huntingdon
Sir Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, KG, KB (ca. 1535 – 14 December 1595) was an English Puritan
Puritan
nobleman. Educated alongside the future Edward VI, he was briefly imprisoned by Mary I, and later considered by some as a potential successor to Elizabeth I. He hotly opposed the scheme to marry Mary, Queen of Scots, to the Duke of Norfolk, and was entrusted by Elizabeth to see that the Scottish queen did not escape at the time of the threatened uprising in 1569
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Favourite
A favourite or favorite (American English) was the intimate companion of a ruler or other important person. In medieval and Early Modern Europe, among other times and places, the term is used of individuals delegated significant political power by a ruler. It was especially a phenomenon of the 16th and 17th centuries, when government had become too complex for many hereditary rulers with no great interest in or talent for it, and political institutions were still evolving. From 1600 to 1660 there were particular successions of all-powerful minister-favourites in much of Europe, especially in Spain, England, France and Sweden.[1] The term is also sometimes employed by writers who want to avoid terms such as "royal mistress", or "friend", "companion" or "lover" of either sex
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Robert Dudley, 1st Earl Of Leicester
Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester
Earl of Leicester
KG PC (24 June 1532[note 1] – 4 September 1588) was an English nobleman and the favourite and close friend of Elizabeth I's, from her first year on the throne until his death. He was a suitor for the queen's hand for many years. Dudley's youth was overshadowed by the downfall of his family in 1553 after his father, the Duke
Duke
of Northumberland, had failed to establish Lady Jane Grey
Lady Jane Grey
on the English throne. Robert Dudley was condemned to death but was released in 1554 and took part in the Battle of St. Quentin under Philip II of Spain, which led to his full rehabilitation. On Elizabeth I's accession in November 1558, Dudley was appointed Master of the Horse. In October 1562, he became a Privy Councillor and, in 1587, was appointed Lord Steward
Lord Steward
of the Royal Household
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Katherine Hastings, Countess Of Huntingdon
Katherine Hastings (née Dudley), Countess of Huntingdon (c. 1538[1] or 1543–1545[2] – 14 August 1620) was an English noblewoman. She was the youngest surviving daughter of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland and his wife, Jane Guildford, and a sister of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, Elizabeth I's favourite. Katherine Dudley was betrothed or married on 25 May 1553 at a very young age to Henry Hastings, the heir of Francis Hastings, 2nd Earl of Huntingdon.[2] From her mother's will it appears that she was still under 12 years of age in January 1555,[2] and a clause regarding her marriage implies that the match could still be dissolved: "if it so chance that my Lord Hastings do refuse her or she him".[2] By the spring of 1559 Katherine Hastings was definitely married,[2] and on the death of her father-in-law in 1560 became Countess of Huntingdon
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William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley
Baron Burghley
KG PC (13 September 1520 – 4 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I
for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–53 and 1558–72) and Lord High Treasurer
Lord High Treasurer
from 1572. Albert Pollard says, "From 1558 for forty years the biography of Cecil is almost indistinguishable from that of Elizabeth and from the history of England."[1] Burghley set as the main goal of English policy the creation of a united and Protestant
Protestant
British Isles. His methods were to complete the control of Ireland, and to forge an alliance with Scotland. Protection from invasion required a powerful Royal Navy
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George Carey (c.1541–1616)
Sir George Cary (c. 1541 – 15 February 1616), of Cockington in the parish of Tor Mohun in Devon, was an English administrator and Member of Parliament who held various offices in Ireland. He was treasurer-at-war to Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex during his campaign in Ireland in 1599, and was appointed a Lord Justice in September 1599 (when Essex left the country) and again in 1603 (on the departure of Charles Blount, 8th Baron Mountjoy). He was Lord Deputy of Ireland from May 1603 to February 1604
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Arthur Lake (MP)
Sir Arthur Lake (1598 – 1633) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1624 to 1626. His reputation was badly damaged by the notorious Lake-Cecil feud which lasted from 1617 to 1621, and both scandalised and fascinated the Jacobean Court.Contents1 Early life 2 The Cecil -Lake feud 3 Politician 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Lake was the eldest son of Sir Thomas Lake, who was Secretary of State to King James I, and his wife Mary Ryder, daughter of Sir William Ryder, Lord Mayor of London. He was a young man of some intellectual promise: he was a student of Middle Temple
Middle Temple
in 1609 and matriculated at New College, Oxford, aged 12 ; his entry to the college is dated 12 October 1610
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Gervase Clifton, 1st Baronet
Sir Gervase Clifton, 1st Baronet, K.B. (25 November 1587 – 28 June 1666) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1666. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War. He was educated at St John's College, Cambridge.[1]Contents1 Political career 2 Family 3 Notes 4 ReferencesPolitical career[edit] In 1603, at the English coronation of King James I, Clifton was made a Knight of the Bath. He became a Justice of the Peace for Nottinghamshire in 1609, remaining until 1646.[2] In 1611 he was third on the list of creations for the new order of baronet.[2][3] He was active in local Nottinghamshire and national politics in both the reign of James I and Charles I
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Thomas Cheek
Sir Thomas Cheek
Thomas Cheek
or Cheke (died March 1659) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons in every parliament between 1614 and 1653.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 See also 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Cheek was the son of Henry Cheke and his wife Frances Radclyffe (daughter of Sir Humphrey Radclyffe of Elstow
Elstow
and sister of Edward Radclyffe, 6th Earl of Sussex), and grandson of Sir John Cheke, royal preceptor and classical scholar. He was educated at York where his school fellows included Thomas Morton, afterwards Bishop of Durham, and Guy Fawkes. He lost his father while a minor: he wrote a Greek letter and Latin verses to the Lord Treasurer in 1586 in which he called himself an orphan, and spoke of his father being gone to the joys of heaven
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East India Company
The East India
India
Company (EIC), also known as the Honourable East India Company (HEIC) or the British East India
India
Company and informally as John Company,[1] was an English and later British joint-stock company,[2] that was formed to pursue trade with the "East Indies"[citation needed] (in present-day terms, Maritime Southeast Asia), but ended up trading mainly with Qing China
Qing China
and seizing control of large parts of the Indian subcontinent. Originally chartered as the "Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading into the East Indies", the company rose to account for half of the world's trade[citation needed], particularly in basic commodities including cotton, silk, indigo dye, salt, saltpetre, tea, and opium
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Kenilworth
Kenilworth
Kenilworth
(/ˈkɛnɪlwərθ/ KEN-il-wərth) is a town and civil parish in Warwickshire, England, about 6 miles (10 km) south-west of the centre of Coventry, 5 miles (8 km) north of Warwick
Warwick
and 90 miles (140 km) north-west of London. The town is on Finham Brook, a tributary of the River Sowe, which joins the River Avon about 2 miles (3 km) north-east of the town centre. The 2011 Census recorded a parish population of 22,413.[1] Kenilworth
Kenilworth
is noted for the extensive ruins of Kenilworth
Kenilworth
Castle
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Longleat House
Longleat
Longleat
is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan
Elizabethan
prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham
Horningsham
and near the towns of Warminster
Warminster
and Westbury in Wiltshire
Wiltshire
and Frome
Frome
in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan
Elizabethan
country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park
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