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Pe'a
The Pe'a is the popular name of the traditional male tatau (tattoo) of Samoa, also known as the malofie, a term used in the Samoan language chiefly vocabulary and 'respect' register (gagana fa'aaloalo).

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English Language
English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now a global lingua franca. Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic languages"> North Germanic language), as well as by Latin language">Latin and Romance languages, especially French. English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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French Polynesia
French Polynesia (/ˈfrɛn pɒlɪˈnʒə/ (About this soundlisten); French: Polynésie française [pɔlinezi fʁɑ̃sɛːz]; Tahitian: Pōrīnetia Farāni) is an overseas collectivity of the French Republic and the only overseas country of France. It is composed of 118 geographically dispersed islands and atolls stretching over an expanse of more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) in the South Pacific Ocean. Its total land area is 4,167 square kilometres (1,609 sq mi). French Polynesia is divided into five groups of islands: the Society Islands archipelago, composed of the Windward Islands and the Leeward Islands; the Tuamotu Archipelago; the Gambier Islands; the Marquesas Islands; and the Austral Islands. Among its 118 islands and atolls, 67 are inhabited
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Chert
Chert ( /ˈɜːrt/) is a fine-grained Sedimentary rock">sedimentary rock composed of microcrystalline or cryptocrystalline silica. Depending on its origin, it can contain either microfossils, small macrofossils, or both
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Upolu
Upolu is an island in Samoa, formed by a massive basaltic shield volcano which rises from the seafloor of the western Pacific Ocean. The island is 75 kilometres (47 miles) long and 1,125 square kilometres (434 square miles) in area, making it the second largest of the Samoan Islands geographically. With approximately 145,000 people, it is by far the most populated of the Samoan Islands. Upolu is situated to the southeast of Savai'i, the "big island". Apia, the capital, is in the middle of the north coast, with Faleolo International Airport at the western end of the island
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Tonga
Tonga (/ˈtɒŋə/ or /ˈtɒŋɡə/; Tongan: [ˈtoŋa] Puleʻanga Fakatuʻi ʻo Tonga), officially the Kingdom of Tonga, is a Polynesian sovereign state and archipelago comprising 169 islands, of which 36 are inhabited. The total surface area is about 750 square kilometres (290 sq mi) scattered over 700,000 square kilometres (270,000 sq mi) of the southern Pacific Ocean. It has a population of 107,122 people, of whom 70% reside on the main island of Tongatapu. Tonga stretches across approximately 800 kilometres (500 mi) in a north-south line
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Christianity
Christianity is an Abrahamic monotheistic religion based on the Jesus in the New Testament">life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth. Its adherents, known as Christians, believe that Jesus is the Christ (title)">Christ, whose coming as the messiah was Old Testament messianic prophecies quoted in the New Testament">prophesied in the Hebrew Bible, called the Old Testament in Christianity, and chronicled in the New Testament. It is the world's largest religion with about 2.4 billion followers. Christianity began as a Second Temple Judaic Jewish Christian">sect in the 1st century in the Roman province of Judea
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Cook Islands
The Cook Islands ( Cook Islands Māori"> Cook Islands Māori: Kūki 'Āirani) is a self-governing island country in the South Pacific Ocean in free association with New Zealand. It comprises 15 islands whose total land area is 240 square kilometres (92.7 sq mi). The Cook Islands' Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) covers 1,800,000 square kilometres (690,000 sq mi) of ocean. New Zealand is responsible for the Cook Islands' defence and foreign affairs, but they are exercised in consultation with the Cook Islands. In recent times, the Cook Islands have adopted an increasingly independent foreign policy. Although Cook Islanders are New Zealand nationality law">citizens of New Zealand, they have the status of Cook Islands nationals, which is not given to other New Zealand citizens
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Candlenut
Aleurites moluccanus (or moluccana), the candlenut, is a flowering tree in the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae, also known as candleberry, Indian walnut, kemiri, varnish tree, nuez de la India, buah keras, or kukui nut tree, and Kekuna tree. Its native range is impossible to establish precisely because of early spread by humans, and the tree is now distributed throughout the New and Old World tropics. It grows to a height of 15–25 m (49–82 ft), with wide spreading or pendulous branches. The leaves are pale green, simple, and ovate, or trilobed or rarely five-lobed, with an acute apex, 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long
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Hawaii
Coordinates: 21°18′41″N 157°47′47″W / 21.31139°N 157.79639°W / 21.31139; -157.79639
State of Hawaii
Hawaiian language text">Mokuʻāina o Hawaiʻi  (Hawaiian)
Flag of Hawaii State seal of Hawaii
Flag Seal
U.S. state nicknames">Nickname(s): The Aloha State (official), Paradise of the Pacific, The Islands of Aloha
U.S
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Robert J. Flaherty
Robert Joseph Flaherty, FRGS (/ˈflæərti, ˈflɑː-/; February 16, 1884 – July 23, 1951) was an American filmmaker who directed and produced the first commercially successful feature-length documentary film, Nanook of the North (1922). The film made his reputation and nothing in his later life fully equaled its success, although he continued the development of this new genre of narrative documentary, e.g. with Moana (1926), set in the South Seas, and Man of Aran (1934), filmed in Ireland's Aran Islands. He is considered the "father" of both the documentary and the ethnographic film. Flaherty was married to writer Frances H. Flaherty from 1914 until his death in 1951. Frances worked on several of her husband's films, and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Story for Louisiana Story (1948).

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Walt Disney Pictures
Walt Disney Pictures, also known as Disney, Inc. and branded as simply Disney since 2011, is an American film studio and a subsidiary of Walt Disney Studios (division)">The Walt Disney Studios, which is ultimately owned by Walt Disney Company">The Walt Disney Company. The subsidiary is the main producer of live-action feature films within the Walt Disney Studios unit, and is based at the Walt Disney Studios (Burbank)"> Walt Disney Studios in Burbank, California. It took on its current name in 1983
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Moana (2016 Film)
Moana (/mˈɑːnə/) is a 2016 American 3D computer-animated musical adventure film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios"> Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures"> Walt Disney Pictures. It is the 56th Walt Disney Animation Studios films">Disney animated feature film. Directed by Ron Clements and John Musker, co-directed by Don Hall and Chris Williams, the film introduces Auliʻi Cravalho as Moana and features the voices of Dwayne Johnson, Rachel House, Temuera Morrison, Jemaine Clement, Nicole Scherzinger, and Alan Tudyk. The film features songs written by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Opetaia Foa'i and orchestral score composed by Mark Mancina. The film tells the story of Moana, the strong-willed daughter of a chief of a Polynesian village, who is chosen by the ocean itself to reunite a mystical relic with a goddess
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