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Paulton
Paulton
Paulton
is a large village and civil parish, with a population of 5,302,[1] located to the north of the Mendip Hills, in the unitary authority of Bath and North East Somerset
Somerset
(BANES), England. Paulton
Paulton
is a former coal mining village and the terminus of the Somerset
Somerset
Coal Canal is at Paulton
Paulton
basin, just north of the village. Paulton
Paulton
was home to the now-closed Polestar Purnells printing factory and Ashman's boot factory, where 'Voidax' safety footwear was manufactured, and in particular Motorcycle speedway boots
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Volcano
A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle.[1] Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire
Pacific Ring of Fire
has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates
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Public House
A pub, or public house, is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic drinks, which traditionally include beer (such as ale) and cider. It is a relaxed, social drinking establishment and a prominent part of British,[1] Irish,[2] Breton, New Zealand, Canadian, South African and Australian cultures.[3] In many places, especially in villages, a pub is the focal point of the community. In his 17th-century diary Samuel Pepys described the pub as "the heart of England".[4] Pubs can be traced back to Roman taverns,[5] through the Anglo-Saxon alehouse to the development of the tied house system in the 19th century. In 1393, King Richard II of England
King Richard II of England
introduced legislation that pubs had to display a sign outdoors to make them easily visible for passing ale tasters, who would assess the quality of ale sold.[6] Most pubs focus on offering beers, ales and similar drinks. As well, pubs often sell wines, spirits, and soft drinks, meals and snacks
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South West England (European Parliament Constituency)
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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List Of Places In England
Here is a list of places, divided by ceremonial county of England.Northumberland Durham Lancashire Cheshire Derbs. Notts. Lincolnshire Leics. Staffs. Shropshire Warks. Northants. Norfolk Suffolk Essex Herts. Beds. Bucks. Oxon. Glos. Somerset Wiltshire Berkshire Kent Surrey Hampshire Dorset Devon Cornwall Heref. Worcs. Bristol East Riding of Yorkshire Rutland Cambs. Greater London Tyne & Wear Cumbria North Yorkshire South Yorks. West Yorkshire Greater Manc. Merseyside East Sussex West Sussex Isle of Wight West MidlandsSee also[edit]Toponymy of Great Britain Toponymical list of counties of the United Kingdom List of generic forms in British place names List of places in the United Kingdom Subdivisions of the United Kingdom List of places in Northern Ireland List of places in Scotland List of places in Wales List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in Englandv t eList of places in EnglandBedfordshire Berkshire Bristol Buckinghamshire
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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Civil Parishes In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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Unitary Authority
A unitary authority is a type of local authority that has a single tier and is responsible for all local government functions within its area or performs additional functions which elsewhere in the relevant country are usually performed by national government or a higher level of sub-national government. Typically unitary authorities cover towns or cities which are large enough to function independently of county or other regional administration. Sometimes they consist of national sub-divisions which are distinguished from others in the same country by having no lower level of administration.Contents1 Canada 2 Central Europe 3 Denmark 4 New Zealand 5 Poland 6 United Kingdom6.1 England 6.2 Northern Ireland 6.3 Scotland 6.4 Wales7 United States 8 See also 9 ReferencesCanada[edit] In Canada, each province creates its own system of local government, so terminology varies substantially. In certain provinces (e.g
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Planning (Listed Buildings And Conservation Areas) Act 1990
The Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 is an Act of Parliament
Act of Parliament
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that altered the laws on granting of planning permission for building works, notably including those of the listed building system in England and Wales. Secondary Legislation[edit] The Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Amendment No. 2) (England) Regulations 2009 were made on 6 October 2009 and came into force on 2 November 2009
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War Memorial
A war memorial is a building, monument, statue or other edifice to celebrate a war or victory, or (predominating in modern times) to commemorate those who died or were injured in a war.Contents1 Symbolism1.1 Historical usage 1.2 Modern usage2 History2.1 World War I 2.2 Pacifist war memorials and those relating to war and peace 2.3 World War II
World War II
and later3 Types3.1 Tank
Tank
Monument4 In cemeteries 5 Controversy 6 Notable examples6.1 Africa 6.2 Americas 6.3 Asia 6.4 Europe 6.5 Oceania7 See also 8 References 9 External linksSymbolism[edit] Historical usage[edit] The oldest war memorial in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is Oxford University's All Souls College itself
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Emergency Medical Services In The United Kingdom
Emergency medical services
Emergency medical services
in the United Kingdom provide emergency care to people with acute illness or injury and are predominantly provided free at the point of use by the four National Health Services of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
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Military Glider
Military gliders (an offshoot of common gliders) have been used by the military of various countries for carrying troops (glider infantry) and heavy equipment to a combat zone, mainly during the Second World War. These engineless aircraft were towed into the air and most of the way to their target by military transport planes, e.g., C-47 Skytrain or Dakota, or bombers relegated to secondary activities, e.g., Short Stirling. Military gliders do not soar. Once released from the tow craft near the front, they were to land on any convenient open terrain close to target, hopefully with as little damage to the cargo and crew as possible as most landing zones (LZ) were far from ideal. The one-way nature of the missions meant that they were treated as disposable leading to construction from common and inexpensive materials such as wood. Troops landing by glider were referred to as air-landing as opposed to paratroops
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Keevil
Keevil
Keevil
is a village and civil parish in Wiltshire, England, about 4 miles (6 km) east of the centre of Trowbridge
Trowbridge
and a similar distance south of Melksham. The village lies on a slope between Great Hinton and Bulkington.[2] Semington Brook forms much of the northeast boundary of the parish.[3] In the far north of the parish, on the A361, is the hamlet of The Strand.Contents1 History 2 Religious sites2.1 Parish church 2.2 Early church 2.3 Methodist chapel3 Landmarks 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] A settlement of 42 households at Chivele was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086, when the land was held by Ernulf de Hesdin.[4] His son, also Ernulf, held the manor in 1130; it passed through various hands until it was sold in 1560 by Henry, Earl of Arundel to Richard Lambert, a grocer of London. His brother's grandson sold the manor to William Beach in 1681
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Arnhem
Arnhem
Arnhem
/ˈɑːrnəm/ or /-hɛm/ (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɑrnɛm] ( listen) or [-ɦɛm] ( listen); German: Arnheim, Frisian: Arnhim, South Guelderish: Èrnem) is a city and municipality situated in the eastern part of the Netherlands. It is the capital of the province of Gelderland
Gelderland
and located on both banks of the rivers Nederrijn
Nederrijn
and Sint-Jansbeek, which was the source of the city's development. Arnhem
Arnhem
had a population of 156,600 in 2017 and is one of the larger cities of the Netherlands
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Operation Market Garden
Operation Market Garden
Operation Market Garden
(17–25 September 1944) was British planned and predominantly led unsuccessful Allied military operation, fought in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
in the Second World War. Airborne and land forces succeeded in the liberation of the Dutch cities of Eindhoven
Eindhoven
and Nijmegen, but failed in keeping their further positions in and around the city of Arnhem
Arnhem
with its strategically important bridge over the river Rhine. The operation included two sub-operations: an airborne assault to seize key bridges (Market) and a ground attack (Garden). The attack was the largest airborne operation up to that point in World War II.[e] Field Marshal Montgomery's strategic goal was to encircle the heart of German industry, the Ruhr, in a pincer movement
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