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Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
Paul Cézanne
(US: /seɪˈzæn/ or UK: /sɪˈzæn/; French: [pɔl sezan]; 19 January 1839 – 22 October 1906) was a French artist and Post-Impressionist
Post-Impressionist
painter whose work laid the foundations of the transition from the 19th-century conception of artistic endeavor to a new and radically different world of art in the 20th century. Cézanne's often repetitive, exploratory brushstrokes are highly characteristic and clearly recognizable. He used planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields. The paintings convey Cézanne's intense study of his subjects. Cézanne is said to have formed the bridge between late 19th-century Impressionism
Impressionism
and the early 20th century's new line of artistic enquiry, Cubism
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Louveciennes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Louveciennes
Louveciennes
is a commune in the Yvelines
Yvelines
department in the Île-de- France
France
region in north-central France
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Retina
The retina is the third and inner coat of the eye which is a light-sensitive layer of tissue. The optics of the eye create an image of the visual world on the retina (through the cornea and lens), which serves much the same function as the film in a camera. Light striking the retina initiates a cascade of chemical and electrical events that ultimately trigger nerve impulses. These are sent to various visual centres of the brain through the fibres of the optic nerve
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Perspective (graphical)
Perspective (from Latin: perspicere "to see through") in the graphic arts is an approximate representation, generally on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye
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Courtauld Institute Of Art
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Courtauld Institute of Art
(UK: /ˈkɔːrtoʊld/), commonly referred to as The Courtauld, is a self-governing college of the University of London
University of London
specialising in the study of the history of art and conservation
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One-point Perspective
Perspective (from Latin: perspicere "to see through") in the graphic arts is an approximate representation, generally on a flat surface (such as paper), of an image as it is seen by the eye
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Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
(also called stereoscopics, or stereo imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision[2]. The word stereoscopy derives from Greek στερεός (stereos), meaning 'firm, solid', and σκοπέω (skopeō), meaning 'to look, to see'.[3][4] Any stereoscopic image is called a stereogram. Originally, stereogram referred to a pair of stereo images which could be viewed using a stereoscope. Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. These two-dimensional images are then combined in the brain to give the perception of 3D depth
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Hippolyte Taine
Hippolyte Adolphe Taine (21 April 1828 – 5 March 1893) was a French critic and historian. He was the chief theoretical influence of French naturalism, a major proponent of sociological positivism and one of the first practitioners of historicist criticism
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Var (department)
The Var (French pronunciation: ​[vaʁ]) is a department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
region in Provence
Provence
in southeastern France. It takes its name from the river Var, which used to flow along its eastern boundary, but the boundary was moved in 1860
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Saint-Zacharie
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Saint-Zacharie
Saint-Zacharie
is a commune in the Var department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur
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Église De La Madeleine (Aix-en-Provence)
Madeleine
Madeleine
may refer to:Contents1 Common meanings 2 Arts and entertainment 3 Places 4 Ships 5 Other 6 See alsoCommon meanings[edit] Madeleine
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Occitania
Occitania
Occitania
(Occitan: Occitània, IPA: [uksiˈtanjɔ], [ukʃiˈtanjɔ], [usiˈtanjɔ], [uksiˈtanja] or [utsiˈtanjɔ][1][2]) is the historical region, and also is a nation,[3] [4] [5] in southern Europe where Occitan
Occitan
was historically the main language spoken,[6] and where it is sometimes still used, for the most part as a second language
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Saint-Sauveur, Hautes-Alpes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Saint-Sauveur is a commune in the Hautes-Alpes
Hautes-Alpes
department in southeastern France. Population[edit]Historical populationYear Pop. ±%1962 181 —    1968 202 +11.6%1975 202 +0.0%1982 270 +33.7%1990 298 +10.4%1999 392 +31.5%2008 442 +12.8%See also[edit]Communes of the
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Disease
A disease is a particular abnormal condition that affects part or all of an organism not caused by external force[1][2] (see 'injury') and that consists of a disorder of a structure or function, usually serving as an evolutionary disadvantage. The study of disease is called pathology, which includes the study of cause. Disease
Disease
is often construed as a medical condition associated with specific symptoms and signs.[3] It may be caused by external factors such as pathogens or by internal dysfunctions, particularly of the immune system, such as an immunodeficiency, or by a hypersensitivity, including allergies and autoimmunity. When caused by pathogens (e.g. malaria by Plasmodium ssp.), the term disease is often misleadingly used even in the scientific literature in place of its causal agent, the pathogen
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Steam Railroad
Various terms are used for passenger rail lines and equipment-the usage of these terms differs substantially between areas:Contents1 Rapid transit1.1 Metro 1.2 Subway 1.3 Underground and Tube 1.4 U-Bahn and S-Bahn 1.5 Elevated and Overhead2 Heavy rail2.1 Europe2.1.1 Austria, Germany, Switzerland 2.1.2 United Kingdom2.2 North America3 At-grade urban rail transit3.1 Tram, streetcar, trolley 3.2 Historical systems 3.3 Light railway 3.4 Light rail 3.5 Interurban 3.6 Tram-train4 Regional and commuter rail4.1 Intercity, Corridor and Long-Distance5 Other types of rail transit 6 Service type6.1 Local service 6.2 Regional service 6.3 Express service7 Passenger boarding7.1 Street-level boarding 7.2 Low-level platforms 7.3 High-level platforms8 Rail terminology with regard to speed8.1 Conventional rail 8.2 Higher-speed rail 8.3 High-speed rail 8.4 Very high-speed rail 8.5 Ultra h
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Binocular Vision
In biology, binocular vision is a type of vision in which an animal having two eyes is able to perceive a single three-dimensional image of its surroundings. Neurological researcher Manfred Fahle has stated six specific advantages of having two eyes rather than just one:[1]It gives a creature a spare eye in case one is damaged. It gives a wider field of view. For example, humans have a maximum horizontal field of view of approximately 190 degrees with two eyes, approximately 120 degrees of which makes up the binocular field of view (seen by both eyes) flanked by two uniocular fields (seen by only one eye) of approximately 40 degrees.[2] It can give stereopsis in which binocular disparity (or parallax) provided by the two eyes' different positions on the head gives precise depth perception
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