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Second Council Of Constantinople
The SECOND COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE is the fifth of the first seven ecumenical councils recognized by both the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
. It is also recognized by the Old Catholics and others. Protestant opinions and recognition of it are varied. Some Protestants, such as Calvinists and Lutherans , recognise the first four councils, whereas most High Church Anglicans accept all seven. Constantinople II was convoked by the Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
Justinian
Justinian
I under the presidency of Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople . It was held from 5 May to 2 June 553. Participants were overwhelmingly Eastern bishops – only sixteen Western bishops were present, including nine from Illyricum and seven from Africa, but none from Italy – out of the 152 total
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Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism
MONASTICISM (from Greek μοναχός, monachos, derived from μόνος, monos, "alone") or MONKHOOD is a religious way of life in which one renounces worldly pursuits to devote oneself fully to spiritual work. Monastic life plays an important role in many Christian
Christian
churches, especially in the Catholic and Orthodox traditions. Similar forms of religious life also exist in other faiths, most notably in Buddhism
Buddhism
, but also in Hinduism
Hinduism
and Jainism
Jainism
, although the expressions differ considerably. By contrast, in other religions monasticism is criticized and not practiced, as in Islam
Islam
and Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
, or plays a marginal role, as in Judaism
Judaism
. Males pursuing a monastic life are generally called monks while female monastics are called nuns
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Bishop (Eastern Orthodox Church)
A BISHOP in the Orthodox Christian Church
Christian Church
is the highest spiritual office within the Universal Church. Unlike in some other Christian denominations, an Orthodox bishop cannot interfere with other dioceses that are not under his own jurisdiction
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Autocephaly
AUTOCEPHALY (/ˌɔːtəˈsɛfəli/ ; from Greek : αὐτοκεφαλία, meaning 'self-headed') is the status of a hierarchical Christian Church
Christian Church
whose head bishop does not report to any higher-ranking bishop (used especially in Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches). When an ecumenical council or a high-ranking bishop , such as a patriarch or other primate , releases an ecclesiastical province from the authority of that bishop while the newly independent church remains in full communion with the hierarchy to which it then ceases to belong, the council or primate is granting autocephaly
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Orthodoxy
ORTHODOXY (from Greek ὀρθοδοξία, orthodoxia – "right opinion") is adherence to correct or accepted creeds , especially in religion. In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church". The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments of the Torah
Torah
are often called Orthodox Jews , though the term "orthodox" historically first described Christian beliefs
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Quinisext Council
The QUINISEXT COUNCIL (often called the COUNCIL IN TRULLO, TRULLAN COUNCIL, or the PENTHEKTE SYNOD) was a church council held in 692 at Constantinople
Constantinople
under Justinian II
Justinian II
. It is often known as the COUNCIL IN TRULLO, because like the Sixth Ecumenical Council it was held in a domed hall in the Imperial Palace (τρούλος meaning a cup or dome). Both the Fifth and the Sixth Ecumenical Councils had omitted to draw up disciplinary canons , and as this council was intended to complete both in this respect, it took the name of Quinisext ( Latin
Latin
: Concilium Quinisextum, Koine Greek
Koine Greek
: Πενθέκτη Σύνοδος, Penthékti Sýnodos), i.e. the Fifth-Sixth Council. It was attended by 215 bishops , all from the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire

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Second Council Of Nicaea
The SECOND COUNCIL OF NICAEA is recognized as the last of the first seven ecumenical councils by the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
. In addition, it is also recognized as such by the Old Catholics and others. Protestant opinions on it are varied. It met in AD 787 in Nicaea (site of the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
; present-day İznik
İznik
in Turkey
Turkey
) to restore the use and veneration of icons (or, holy images), which had been suppressed by imperial edict inside the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
during the reign of Leo III (717–741). His son, Constantine V (741–775), had held the Council of Hieria to make the suppression official
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Third Council Of Constantinople
The THIRD COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE, counted as the SIXTH ECUMENICAL COUNCIL by the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
, the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and other Christian groups, met in 680/681 and condemned monoenergism and monothelitism as heretical and defined Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ
as having two energies and two wills (divine and human). CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 Proceedings * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 Bibliography * 6 External links BACKGROUND Main article: Monothelitism The Council settled a set of theological controversies that go back to the sixth century but had intensified under the Emperors Heraclius (610–641) and Constans II
Constans II
(641–668)
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Council Of Ephesus
The COUNCIL OF EPHESUS was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus (near present-day Selçuk
Selçuk
in Turkey
Turkey
) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II
Theodosius II
. This third ecumenical council , an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom
Christendom
, confirmed the original Nicene Creed
Nicene Creed
, and condemned the teachings of Nestorius , Patriarch of Constantinople
Patriarch of Constantinople
, who held that the Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
may be called the Christotokos, "Birth Giver of Christ" but not the Theotokos
Theotokos
, "Birth Giver of God"
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Council Of Chalcedon
The COUNCIL OF CHALCEDON (/kælˈsiːdən/ or /ˈkælsᵻdɒn/ ) was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon . The Council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church , the Eastern Orthodox Church , and most Protestants . Its most important achievement was to issue the Chalcedonian Definition . The Council's judgments and definitions regarding the divine marked a significant turning point in the Christological debates. A minority of Christians do not agree with the council's teachings. Chalcedon was a city in Bithynia , on the Asian side of the Bosphorus ; today the city it is part of the Republic of Turkey and is known as Kadıköy (a district of Istanbul )
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First Council Of Constantinople
The FIRST COUNCIL OF CONSTANTINOPLE (Greek : Πρώτη σύνοδος της Κωνσταντινουπόλεως commonly known as Greek : Β΄ Οικουμενική, "Second Ecumenical"; Latin : Concilium Constantinopolitanum Primum or Latin : Concilium Constantinopolitanum A) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople
Constantinople
in AD 381 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I
Theodosius I
. This second ecumenical council , an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom , confirmed the Nicene Creed
Nicene Creed
, expanding the doctrine thereof to produce the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed , and dealt with sundry other matters. It met from May to July 381 in the Church of Hagia Irene and was affirmed as ecumenical in 451 at the Council of Chalcedon
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First Council Of Nicaea
The FIRST COUNCIL OF NICAEA (/naɪˈsiːə/ ; Greek : Νίκαια ) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea
Nicaea
(now Iznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I
Constantine I
in AD 325. Constantine I
Constantine I
organized the Council along the lines of the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
and presided over it, but did not cast any official vote. This ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the Church through an assembly representing all of Christendom . Hosius of Corduba , who was probably one of the Papal legates , may have presided over its deliberations
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Ecumenical Council
An ECUMENICAL COUNCIL (or OECUMENICAL COUNCIL; also GENERAL COUNCIL) is a conference of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice in which those entitled to vote are convoked from the whole world (oikoumene) and which secures the approbation of the whole Church
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First Seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity
Christianity
, the FIRST SEVEN ECUMENICAL COUNCILS, from the First Council of Nicaea (325) to the Second Council of Nicaea (787), represented an attempt by Church leaders to reach an orthodox consensus, restore peace and develop a unified Christendom . Eastern Orthodox Christians , Oriental Orthodox Christians , Nestorians , and Roman Catholics , all trace the legitimacy of their clergy by apostolic succession back to this period and beyond, to the earlier period referred to as Early Christianity . This era begins with the First Council of Nicaea, which enunciated the Nicene Creed that in its original form and as modified by the First Council of Constantinople
First Council of Constantinople
of 381 was seen by all later councils as the touchstone of orthodoxy on the doctrine of the Trinity
Trinity

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Four Marks Of The Church
The FOUR MARKS OF THE CHURCH is a term describing four distinctive adjectives—ONE, HOLY, CATHOLIC AND APOSTOLIC — of traditional Christian
Christian
ecclesiology as expressed in the Nicene Creed
Nicene Creed
completed at the First Council of Constantinople
First Council of Constantinople
in AD 381: " in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church." In Protestant theology these are sometimes called the ATTRIBUTES OF THE CHURCH. They are still confessed today in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed, recited in the liturgy of the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
(both Latin and Eastern Rites ), the Orthodox Church , the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
, and in many classical Protestant denominations ' worship services
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