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Fifth Council Of Constantinople
Fifth Council of Constantinople
Constantinople
is a name given to a series of six patriarchal councils held in the Byzantine capital Constantinople between 1341 and 1351, to deal with a dispute concerning the mystical doctrine of Hesychasm. These are referred to also as the Hesychast councils or the Palamite councils, since they discussed the theology of Gregory Palamas, whom Barlaam of Seminara
Barlaam of Seminara
opposed in the first of the series, and others in the succeeding five councils. The result of these councils is accepted as having the authority of an ecumenical council by Orthodox Christians[1] who sometimes call it the Ninth Ecumenical Council. Principal supporters of the view that this series of councils comprises the Ninth Ecumenical Council include Metropolitan Hierotheos (Vlachos) of Nafpaktos, Fr. John S. Romanides, and Fr
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Serbian Orthodox Church
The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
(Serbian: Српска православна црква / Srpska pravoslavna crkva) is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Christian Churches. It is the second oldest Slavic Orthodox Church in the world (after the Bulgarian Orthodox Church). The Serbian Orthodox Church
Serbian Orthodox Church
comprises the majority of the population in Serbia, Montenegro, and the Republika Srpska
Republika Srpska
entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Priesthood (Orthodox Church)
Presbyter is, in the Bible, a synonym for bishop (episkopos), referring to a leader in local Church congregations. In modern usage, it is distinct from bishop and synonymous with priest. Its literal meaning in Greek (presbyteros) is "elder." One addresses a Greek Orthodox Priest as “Father”.Contents1 Holy orders 2 Ministry 3 History 4 Modern usage 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksHoly orders[edit] Through the sacrament of holy orders, an ordination to priesthood is performed by the bishop. But this requires the consent of the whole people of God, so at a point in the service, the congregation acclaim the ordination by shouting Axios! (He is worthy!) Orthodox priests consist of both married clergymen and celibate clergymen. In the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
a married man may be ordained to the priesthood. His marriage, however, must be the first for both him and his wife
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Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism
The degrees of Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation. In the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.Contents1 Orthodox monasticism 2 Degrees2.1 Novice 2.2 Rassophore 2.3 Stavrophore 2.4 Great Schema3 Coptic Orthodox monastic degrees 4 See also 5 External linksOrthodox monasticism[edit] Unlike in Western Christianity, where individual religious orders and societies arose, each with its own profession rites, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, there is only one type of monasticism
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Second Council Of Constantinople
The Second Council of Constantinople
Second Council of Constantinople
is the fifth of the first seven ecumenical councils recognized by both the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and the Roman Catholic Church. It is also recognized by the Old Catholics and others. Protestant opinions and recognition of it are varied. Some Protestants, such as Calvinists and Lutherans, recognise the first four councils,[2] whereas most High Church
High Church
Anglicans accept all seven. Constantinople II was convoked by the Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
Justinian
Justinian
I under the presidency of Patriarch Eutychius of Constantinople. It was held from 5 May to 2 June 553
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Christ Pantocrator
In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ)[1] is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God
God
in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth "Lord of Hosts"[2] and for El Shaddai " God
God
Almighty".[3] In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18) and nine times in the Book of Revelation: 1:8, 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, and 21:22
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Council Of Chalcedon
The Council of Chalcedon
Chalcedon
(/kælˈsiːdən, ˈkælsɪdɒn/)[1] was a church council held from October 8 to November 1, AD 451, at Chalcedon. The council is numbered as the fourth ecumenical council by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and most Protestants
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Council Of Ephesus
The Council of Ephesus
Ephesus
was a council of Christian bishops convened in Ephesus
Ephesus
(near present-day Selçuk
Selçuk
in Turkey) in AD 431 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius II. This third ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom,[1] confirmed the original Nicene Creed,[2] and condemned the teachings of Nestorius, Patriarch of Constantinople, who held that the Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
may be called the Christotokos, "Birth Giver of Christ" but not the Theotokos, "Birth Giver of God"
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Romanian Orthodox Church
(as Metropolis of Romania) Nifon Rusailă, Carol I (as Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Romania) Miron Cristea, Ferdinand IIndependence 1872Recognition 25 April 1885Primate Daniel, Patriarch
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First Council Of Nicaea
The First Council of Nicaea
Nicaea
(/naɪˈsiːə/; Greek: Νίκαια [ˈnikεa]) was a council of Christian bishops convened in the Bithynian city of Nicaea
Nicaea
(now İznik, Bursa province, Turkey) by the Roman Emperor Constantine I
Constantine I
in AD 325. Constantine I
Constantine I
organized the council along the lines of the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
and presided over it, but did not cast any official vote. This ecumenical council was the first effort to attain consensus in the Church through an assembly representing all of Christendom
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Bulgarian Orthodox Church
The Bulgarian Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
(Bulgarian: Българска православна църква, Balgarska pravoslavna tsarkva) ) is an autocephalous Orthodox Church. It is the oldest Slavic Orthodox Church with some 6.5 million members in the Republic of Bulgaria
Bulgaria
and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas
Americas
and Australia
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Georgian Orthodox Church
The Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous
Autocephalous
Orthodox Church (Georgian: საქართველოს სამოციქულო ავტოკეფალური მართლმადიდებელი ეკლესია, sakartvelos samotsikulo avt’ok’epaluri martlmadidebeli ek’lesia) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. It is Georgia's dominant religious institution, and a majority of Georgian people
Georgian people
are members. It asserts apostolic foundation, and its historical roots can be traced to the Christianization of Iberia
Christianization of Iberia
by Saint Nino
Saint Nino
in the 4th century AD. As in similar autocephalous Orthodox churches, the Church's highest governing body is the Holy Synod
Holy Synod
of bishops
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First Council Of Constantinople
The First Council of Constantinople
Constantinople
(Greek: Πρώτη σύνοδος της Κωνσταντινουπόλεως commonly known as Greek: Β΄ Οικουμενική, "Second Ecumenical"; Latin: Concilium Constantinopolitanum Primum or Latin: Concilium Constantinopolitanum A) was a council of Christian bishops convened in Constantinople
Constantinople
in AD 381 by the Roman Emperor Theodosius I.[1][2] This second ecumenical council, an effort to attain consensus in the church through an assembly representing all of Christendom,[3] confirmed the Nicene Creed, expanding the doctrine thereof to produce the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed, and dealt with sundry other matters
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Polish Orthodox Church
The Polish Autocephalous
Autocephalous
Orthodox Church, commonly known as the Polish Orthodox Church (Polish: Polski Autokefaliczny Kościół Prawosławny), or (Orthodox) Church of Poland
Poland
is one of the autocephalous Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Churches in full communion
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Orthodox Autocephalous Church Of Albania
The Autocephalous
Autocephalous
Orthodox Church of Albania
Albania
(Albanian: Kisha Ortodokse Autoqefale e Shqipërisë) is one of the newest autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Churches. It declared its autocephaly in 1922 through its Congress of 1922, and gained recognition from the Patriarch of Constantinople in 1937. The church suffered during the Second World War, and in the communist period that followed, especially after 1967 when Albania
Albania
was declared an atheist state, and no public or private expression of religion was allowed. The church has, however, seen a revival since religious freedom was restored in 1991, with more than 250 churches rebuilt or restored, and more than 100 clergy being ordained
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