HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Parent Company
A PARENT COMPANY is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors . The second company is deemed a subsidiary of the parent company. CONTENTS* 1 By country * 1.1 Australia (AU) * 1.2 Singapore * 1.3 United Kingdom (UK) * 2 See also * 3 References BY COUNTRYAUSTRALIA (AU)The parent company-subsidiary company relationship is defined by Part 1.2, Division 6, Section 46 of the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) , which states: A body corporate (in this section called the first body ) is a subsidiary of another body corporate if, and only if: (a) the other body: (i) controls the composition of the first body's board; or (ii) is in a position to cast, or control the casting of, more than one-half of the maximum number of votes that might be cast at a general meeting of the first body; or (iii) holds more than one-half of the issued share capital of the first body (excluding any part of that issued share capital that carries no right to participate beyond a specified amount in a distribution of either profits or capital); or (b) the first body is a subsidiary of a subsidiary of the other body. SINGAPOREThe parent company-subsidiary company relationship is defined by Part 1, Section 5, Subsection 1 of the Companies Act , which states: 5
[...More...]

"Parent Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Talk
TALK may refer to: * Conversation , interactive communication between two or more people * Speech , the production of a spoken language * Interaction , face to face conversations * Compulsive talking , beyond the bounds of what is considered to be a socially acceptable amount of talking * Communication , the encoding and decoding of exchanged messages between peopleCONTENTS * 1 Software * 2 Books * 3 Film and TV * 4 Music * 4.1 Albums * 4.2 Songs SOFTWARE * Google Talk , a Windows- and web-based instant messaging program * talk (software) , a Unix messaging program * AppleTalk , an early networking protocol designed by Apple for their Macintosh computersBOOKS * _Talk_ (play) , a play by Carl Hancock Rux * _Talk_ (magazine) , an American magazineFILM AND TV * _Talk_ (film) , a 1994 Australian film * Talk show , a broadcast program format * Talk radio , a radio formatMUSIC * Talk Talk , a British rock group active from 1981 to 1991ALBUMS * _Talk_ (Yes album) , 1994 * _Talk_ (Paul Kelly album) , 1981SONGS * "Talk" (Coldplay song) * "Talk" (DJ Snake song) * "Talk", by Kreesha Turner on the album _Passion _ * "Talk", by Tracy Bonham on the album _ The Liverpool Sessions _ * "Talk", by M.I.A
[...More...]

"Talk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Company
A COMPANY, abbreviated CO., is a legal entity made up of an association of people, be they natural , legal , or a mixture of both, for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise. Company members share a common purpose and unite in order to focus their various talents and organize their collectively available skills or resources to achieve specific, declared goals . Companies take various forms such as: * Voluntary associations which may include nonprofit organization * A group of soldiers * Business entities with an aim of gaining a profit * Financial entities and banks A company or association of persons can be created at law as legal person so that the company in itself can accept limited liability for civil responsibility and taxation incurred as members perform (or fail) to discharge their duty within the publicly declared _"birth certificate" _ or published policy . Because companies are legal persons, they also may associate and register themselves as companies – often known as a corporate group . When the company closes it may need a _"death certificate" _ to avoid further legal obligations
[...More...]

"Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Common Stock
COMMON STOCK is a form of corporate equity ownership, a type of security . The terms VOTING SHARE and ORDINARY SHARE are also used frequently in other parts of the world; "common stock" being primarily used in the United States . They are known as EQUITY SHARES or Ordinary shares in the UK and other Commonwealth realms. This type of share gives the stockholder the right to share in the profits of the company, and to vote on matters of corporate policy and the composition of the members of the board of directors . It is called "common" to distinguish it from preferred stock . If both types of stock exist, common/equity stockholders usually cannot be paid dividends until all preferred/preference stock dividends are paid in full; it is possible to have common stock that has dividends that are paid alongside the preferred stock. In the event of bankruptcy , common stock investors receive any remaining funds after bondholders, creditors (including employees), and preferred stockholders are paid. As such, common stock investors often receive nothing after a liquidation bankruptcy Chapter 7 . Common stockholders can also earn money through capital appreciation . Common shares may perform better than preferred shares or bonds over time, in part to accommodate the increased risk
[...More...]

"Common Stock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Board Of Directors
A BOARD OF DIRECTORS is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization , which can be either a for-profit business , nonprofit organization , or a government agency . A board of directors' powers, duties and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law ) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws . These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation , non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders and the board is the highest authority in the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction. In corporations with dispersed ownership, the identification and nomination of directors (that shareholders vote for or against) are often done by the board itself, leading to a high degree of self-perpetuation. In a non-stock corporation with no general voting membership, the board is the supreme governing body of the institution; its members are sometimes chosen by the board itself
[...More...]

"Board Of Directors" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Subsidiary
A SUBSIDIARY, SUBSIDIARY COMPANY or DAUGHTER COMPANY is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the _parent company _, _parent_, or _holding company _. The subsidiary can be a company, corporation , or limited liability company . In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise . In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints . In the United States railroad industry, an OPERATING SUBSIDIARY is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock . In contrast, a NON-OPERATING SUBSIDIARY would exist on paper only (i.e., stocks, bonds, articles of incorporation) and would use the identity of the parent company . Subsidiaries are a common feature of business life, and most multinational corporations organize their operations in this way. Examples include holding companies such as Berkshire Hathaway
Berkshire Hathaway
, Leucadia National Corporation
Corporation
, Time Warner
Time Warner
, or Citigroup
Citigroup
; as well as more focused companies such as IBM
IBM
or Xerox . These, and others, organize their businesses into national and functional subsidiaries, often with multiple levels of subsidiaries
[...More...]

"Subsidiary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Corporations Act 2001
The CORPORATIONS ACT 2001 (CTH) (the Corporations Act, or informally as the 'Corps' Act) is an act of the Commonwealth of Australia that sets out the laws dealing with business entities in Australia at federal and interstate level. It focuses primarily on companies , although it also covers some laws relating to other entities such as partnerships and managed investment schemes. The Corporate Law Economic Reform Program Act 2004 reforms simplified the statute. At several thousand pages long, the statute dwarfs those of other nations such as Sweden, whose corporations statute, comparatively, is less than 200 pages long. The Corporations Act is the principal legislation regulating companies in Australia. It regulates matters such as the formation and operation of companies (in conjunction with a constitution that may be adopted by a company), duties of officers, takeovers and fundraising. CONTENTS * 1 Constitutional basis * 2 Outline of the Act * 2.1 Volume 1 * 2.1.1 Chapters 1–2K (ss. 1 – 282) * 2.2 Volume 2 * 2.2.1 Chapters 2L–5B (ss. 283AA – 601DJ) * 2.3 Volume 3 * 2.3.1 Chapters 5C–6D (ss. 601EA – 742) * 2.4 Volume 4 * 2.4.1 Chapter 7 (ss
[...More...]

"Corporations Act 2001" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Legal Personality
A LEGAL PERSON, in legal contexts often simply PERSON, less ambiguously LEGAL ENTITY, is any human or non-human entity, in other words, any human being, firm, or government agency that is recognized as having legal rights and obligations, such as having the ability to enter into contracts, to sue, and to be sued. The term "legal person" is however ambiguous because it is also used in contradistinction to "natural person", i.e. as a synonym of terms used to refer only to non-human legal entities. So there are of two kinds of legal entities, human and non-human: natural persons (also called physical persons) and juridical persons (also called juridic, juristic, artificial, legal, or fictitious persons, Latin : persona ficta), which are other entities (such as corporations) that are treated in law as if they were persons. While human beings acquire legal personhood when they are born, juridical persons do so when they are incorporated in accordance with law. Legal personhood is a prerequisite to legal capacity , the ability of any legal person to amend (enter into, transfer, etc.) rights and obligations . In international law, consequently, legal personality is a prerequisite for an international organization to be able to sign international treaties in its own name
[...More...]

"Legal Personality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

General Meeting
An ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (commonly abbreviated as AGM, also known as the ANNUAL MEETING) is a meeting of the general membership of an organization. These organizations include membership associations and companies with shareholders . These meetings may be required by law or by the constitution , charter , or by-laws governing the body. The meetings are held to conduct business on behalf of the organization or company. CONTENTS * 1 Purpose * 2 Public companies in the United States * 3 Private companies in Great Britain * 4 See also * 5 References PURPOSEAn organization may conduct its business at the annual general meeting. The business may include electing a board of directors , making important decisions regarding the organization, and informing the members of previous and future activities. At this meeting, the shareholders and partners may receive copies of the company's accounts, review fiscal information for the past year, and ask any questions regarding the directions the business will take in the future. At the annual general meeting, the president or chairman of the organization presides over the meeting and may give an overall status of the organization. The secretary prepares the minutes and may be asked to read important papers. The treasurer may present a financial report. Other officers, the board of directors , and committees may give their reports
[...More...]

"General Meeting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom
The UNITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTHERN IRELAND, commonly known as the UNITED KINGDOM (UK) or BRITAIN, is a sovereign country in western Europe. Lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland , the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
includes the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland
Ireland
and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
, with the North Sea to its east, the English Channel to its south and the Celtic Sea to its south-south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world . The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world and the 11th-largest in Europe
Europe
. It is also the 21st-most populous country , with an estimated 65.1 million inhabitants
[...More...]

"United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conglomerate (company)
A CONGLOMERATE is the combination of two or more corporations engaged in entirely different businesses that fall under one corporate group , usually involving a parent company and many subsidiaries . Often, a conglomerate is a MULTI-INDUSTRY COMPANY. Conglomerates are often large and multinational . Conglomerates were popular in the 1960s due to a combination of low interest rates and a repeating bear/bull market , which allowed the conglomerates to buy companies in leveraged buyouts , sometimes at temporarily deflated values. Famous examples from the 1960s include Ling-Temco-Vought , ITT
ITT
Corporation
Corporation
, Litton Industries , Textron , Teledyne
Teledyne
. Because of low interest on the loans, the overall return on investment of the conglomerate appeared to grow. Also, the conglomerate had a better ability to borrow in the money market , or capital market , than the smaller firm at their community bank . For many years this was enough to make the company's stock price rise, as companies were often valued largely on their return on investment. The aggressive nature of the conglomerators themselves was enough to make many investors, who saw a "powerful" and seemingly unstoppable force in business, buy their stock. High stock prices allowed them to raise more loans, based on the value of their stock, and thereby buy even more companies
[...More...]

"Conglomerate (company)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Holding Company
A HOLDING COMPANY is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock . The term usually refers to a company that does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group . Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States , 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed. That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially Company A transferring cash from one company to the other. Any other shareholders of Company B will pay the usual taxes on dividends, as they are legitimate and ordinary dividends to these shareholders . Sometimes a company intended to be a pure holding company identifies itself as such by adding "Holding" or "Holdings" to its name. CONTENTS* 1 United States * 1.1 Banking * 1.2 Utilities * 1.3 Broadcasting * 1.4 Personal holding company * 2 Parent company * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links UNITED STATESBANKING Further information: bank holding company After the financial crisis of 2007–08 , many U.S. investment banks converted to holding companies
[...More...]

"Holding Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minority Interest
In accounting , MINORITY INTEREST (or NON-CONTROLLING INTEREST) is the portion of a subsidiary corporation's stock that is not owned by the parent corporation. The magnitude of the minority interest in the subsidiary company is generally less than 50% of outstanding shares , or the corporation would generally cease to be a subsidiary of the parent. It is, however, possible (such as through special voting rights) for a controlling interest requiring consolidation to be achieved without exceeding 50% ownership, depending on the accounting standards being employed. Minority interest
Minority interest
belongs to other investors and is reported on the consolidated balance sheet of the owning company to reflect the claim on assets belonging to other, non-controlling shareholders. Also, minority interest is reported on the consolidated income statement as a share of profit belonging to minority shareholders. The reporting of 'minority interest' is a consequence of the requirement by accounting standards to 'fully' consolidate partly owned subsidiaries. Full consolidation, as opposed to partial consolidation, results in financial statements that are constructed as if the parent corporation fully owns these partly owned subsidiaries; except for two line items that reflect partial ownership of subsidiaries: net income to common shareholders and common equity
[...More...]

"Minority Interest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

AustLII
The AUSTRALASIAN LEGAL INFORMATION INSTITUTE (AUSTLII) is an institution operated jointly by the Faculties of Law of the University of Technology Sydney and the University of New South Wales . Its public policy purpose is to improve access to justice through access to legal information. CONTENTS * 1 Inception * 2 Content * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links INCEPTIONAustLII was established in 1995. Founded as joint program of the University of Technology Sydney and the University of New South Wales Law schools , its initial funding was provided by the Australian Research Council . CONTENTAustLII content is publicly available legal information. Its primary source information includes legislation , treaties and decisions of courts and tribunals . It also hosts secondary legal materials, including law reform and Royal Commission reports, as well as legal journals . The AustLII databases include the complete text of all of the decisions of the High Court , decisions of the Federal Court from 1977 onwards (the decisions between 1977 and 1996 were selected by the Federal Court), and decisions of the Family Court from 1988 onwards (as selected by the Family Court), as well as a number of other federal and state courts and tribunals. SEE ALSO * Free Access to Law Movement * Legal Information Institute * ComLaw REFERENCES * ^ "Australasian Legal Information Institute (AustLII) – Description"
[...More...]

"AustLII" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * _Special_ (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials , a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on _The Blind Leading the Naked _ * "Special", a song on _ The Documentary _ album by GameFILM AND TELEVISION * Special (lighting) , a stage light that is used for a single, specific purpose * "Special" (Lost) , an episode of the television series _Lost_ * _Special_ (film) * _The Specials_ (film) * Television special , television programming that temporarily replaces scheduled programmingOTHER USES * A special price, a form of discounts and allowances * A kit car or one-off home built vehicle * A euphemi
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Parent Company
A PARENT COMPANY is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors . The second company is deemed a subsidiary of the parent company. CONTENTS* 1 By country * 1.1 Australia (AU) * 1.2 Singapore * 1.3 United Kingdom (UK) * 2 See also * 3 References BY COUNTRYAUSTRALIA (AU)The parent company-subsidiary company relationship is defined by Part 1.2, Division 6, Section 46 of the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth) , which states: A body corporate (in this section called the first body ) is a subsidiary of another body corporate if, and only if: (a) the other body: (i) controls the composition of the first body's board; or (ii) is in a position to cast, or control the casting of, more than one-half of the maximum number of votes that might be cast at a general meeting of the first body; or (iii) holds more than one-half of the issued share capital of the first body (excluding any part of that issued share capital that carries no right to participate beyond a specified amount in a distribution of either profits or capital); or (b) the first body is a subsidiary of a subsidiary of the other body. SINGAPOREThe parent company-subsidiary company relationship is defined by Part 1, Section 5, Subsection 1 of the Companies Act , which states: 5
[...More...]

"Parent Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.