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Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
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Company
A company, abbreviated as co., is a legal entity made up of an association of people, be they natural, legal, or a mixture of both, for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise. Company
Company
members share a common purpose, and unite in order to focus their various talents and organize their collectively available skills or resources to achieve specific, declared goals
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Common Stock
Common stock
Common stock
is a form of corporate equity ownership, a type of security. The terms voting share and ordinary share are also used frequently in other parts of the world; "common stock" being primarily used in the United States. They are known as Equity shares or Ordinary shares in the UK and other Commonwealth realms. This type of share gives the stockholder the right to share in the profits of the company, and to vote on matters of corporate policy and the composition of the members of the board of directors. It is called "common" to distinguish it from preferred stock
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Board Of Directors
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws. These authorities may specify the number of members of the board, how they are to be chosen, and how often they are to meet. In an organization with voting members, the board is accountable to, and might be subordinate to, the organization's full membership, which usually vote for the members of the board. In a stock corporation, non-executive directors are voted for by the shareholders and the board is the highest authority in the management of the corporation. The board of directors appoints the chief executive officer of the corporation and sets out the overall strategic direction
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Corporations Act 2001
The Corporations Act 2001
Corporations Act 2001
(Cth) (the Corporations Act, or CA 2001) is an Act of the Commonwealth of Australia
Australia
which sets out the laws dealing with business entities in Australia
Australia
at federal and interstate level. It deals primarily with companies, although it also deals with other entities, such as partnerships and managed investment schemes. The Act is the primary basis of Australian corporations law. The Corporate Law Economic Reform Program Act 2004 simplified the statute, which at 3,354 pages dwarfs those of other nations such as Sweden, whose corporations statute, comparatively, is less than 200 pages long. The Corporations Act is the principal legislation regulating companies in Australia
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Legal Personality
A legal person (in legal contexts often simply person, less ambiguously legal entity)[1][2] is any human or non-human entity, in other words, any human being, firm, or government agency that is recognized as having legal rights and obligations, such as having the ability to enter into contracts, to sue, and to be sued.[3][4][5] The term "legal person" is however ambiguous because it is also used in contradistinction to "natural person", i.e
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General Meeting
An annual general meeting (commonly abbreviated as AGM, also known as the annual meeting) is a meeting of the general membership of an organization. These organizations include membership associations and companies with shareholders. These meetings may be required by law or by the constitution, charter, or by-laws governing the body. The meetings are held to conduct business on behalf of the organization or company.Contents1 Purpose 2 Public companies
Public companies
in the United States 3 Private companies in Great Britain 4 See also 5 ReferencesPurpose[edit] An organization may conduct its business at the annual general meeting
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Conglomerate (company)
A conglomerate is the combination of two or more corporations engaged in entirely different businesses that fall under one corporate group, usually involving a parent company and many subsidiaries. Often, a conglomerate is a multi-industry company. Conglomerates are often large and multinational. Conglomerates were popular in the 1960s due to a combination of low interest rates and a repeating bear-bull market, which allowed the conglomerates to buy companies in leveraged buyouts, sometimes at temporarily deflated values
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Holding Company
A holding company is a company that owns other companies' outstanding stock. A holding company usually does not produce goods or services itself; rather, its purpose is to own shares of other companies to form a corporate group. Holding companies allow the reduction of risk for the owners and can allow the ownership and control of a number of different companies. In the United States, 80% of stock, in voting and value, must be owned before tax consolidation benefits such as tax-free dividends can be claimed.[1] That is, if Company A owns 80% or more of the stock of Company B, Company A will not pay taxes on dividends paid by Company B to its stockholders, as the payment of dividends from B to A is essentially transferring cash from one company to the other
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Minority Interest
In accounting, minority interest (or non-controlling interest) is the portion of a subsidiary corporation's stock that is not owned by the parent corporation. The magnitude of the minority interest in the subsidiary company is generally less than 50% of outstanding shares, or the corporation would generally cease to be a subsidiary of the parent.[1] It is, however, possible (such as through special voting rights) for a controlling interest requiring consolidation to be achieved without exceeding 50% ownership, depending on the accounting standards being employed
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AustLII
The Australasian Legal Information Institute
Legal Information Institute
(AustLII) is an institution operated jointly by the Faculties of Law of the University of Technology Sydney and the University of New South Wales. Its public policy purpose is to improve access to justice through access to legal information.[1]Contents1 Inception 2 Content 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksInception[edit] AustLII was established in 1995.[2][3] Founded as joint program of the University of Technology Sydney
University of Technology Sydney
and the University of New South Wales Law schools, its initial funding was provided by the Australian Research Council.[4] Content[edit] AustLII content is publicly available legal information. Its primary source information includes legislation, treaties and decisions of courts and tribunals
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
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