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Panhard AML
The Panhard
Panhard
AML (Auto Mitrailleuse Légère, or "Light Armoured Car")[3] is a fast, long-ranged, and relatively cheap first-generation armoured car with excellent reconnaissance capability.[7] Designed on a small, lightly armoured 4X4 chassis, it weighs an estimated 5.5 tonnes—much lighter than a tank—and is therefore more suited to rapid airborne deployments.[8] Since 1959 AMLs have been marketed on up to five continents; several variants remained in continuous production for half a century.[9] These have been operated by fifty-four national governments and other entities worldwide, seeing regular comb
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Musée Des Blindés
The Musée des Blindés
Musée des Blindés
("Museum of Armoured Vehicles") or Musée Général Estienne is a tank museum located in the Loire Valley
Loire Valley
of France, in the town of Saumur. It is now one of the world's largest tank museums. It began in 1977 under the leadership of Colonel Michel Aubry, who convinced both the French military hierarchy and the local political authorities. Started 35 years ago with only a few hundred tracked vehicles, it has become a world-class collection which attracts visitors interested in the history of multinational tank development as well as professional armor specialists
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Syrian Civil War Spillover In Lebanon
Decisive Lebanese government victoryMillions of Syrian refugees enter Lebanon
Lebanon
as a result of the civil war in Syria The Lebanese Army
Lebanese Army
and Hezbollah
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Second Sudanese Civil War
Stalemate[4]Comprehensive Peace Agreement Eastern Sudan
Sudan
Peace Agreement Independence of the Republic of South Sudan
Republic of South Sudan
following a 2011 referendum Sudan–SPLM-N conflictBelligerent
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Djiboutian–Eritrean Border Conflict
Djiboutian Political VictoryEritrean forces seize territory from Djibouti
Djibouti
in April 2008 and withdraw in June 2010 to help facilitate the start of bilateral negotiations Qatari peacekeeping forces are deployed to monitor the disputed area after Eritrea's withdrawal[2]Belligerents Eritrea  Djibouti Supported by:[a]  France[1]Commanders and leaders Isaias Afewerki Sebhat Ephrem Ismail Omar Guelleh Ougoureh Kifleh AhmedCasualties and losses100 killed 267 captured[3] 21 defected[b] 44 killed 55 wounded 19 captureda Logistical, medical and intelligence support
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2004 French–Ivorian Clashes
In 2004, an armed conflict took place between France and Côte d'Ivoire. On 6 November 2004, Ivorians launched an air attack on French peacekeepers in the northern part of Côte d'Ivoire who were stationed there as part of Operation Unicorn (French: Opération Licorne), the French military operation in support of the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire (UNOCI). French military forces subsequently clashed with Ivorian troops and government-loyal mobs, destroying the entire Ivorian Air Force. Those incidents were followed by massive anti-French protests in Côte d'Ivoire.Contents1 Background 2 Ivorian attack on French forces 3 Retaliation by the French and subsequent riots 4 Aftermath 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] In 2002, a civil war broke out in Côte d'Ivoire between Ivorian military and other forces loyal to Laurent Gbagbo, the Ivorian president since 2000, and rebel forces identified with the Forces Nouvelles de Côte d'Ivoire
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First Ivorian Civil War
The First Ivorian Civil War
First Ivorian Civil War
was a conflict in the Ivory Coast
Ivory Coast
(also known as Côte d'Ivoire) that began in 2002. Although most of the fighting ended by late 2004, the country remained split in two, with a rebel-held Muslim
Muslim
north and a government-held Christian
Christian
south. Hostility increased and raids on foreign troops and civilians rose
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Second Ivorian Civil War
The Second Ivorian Civil War[10][11] broke out in March 2011 when the crisis in Ivory Coast
Ivory Coast
escalated into full-scale military conflict between forces loyal to Laurent Gbagbo, the President of Ivory Coast since 2000, and supporters of the internationally recognised president-elect Alassane Ouattara. After months of unsuccessful negotiations and sporadic violence between supporters of the two sides, the crisis entered a critical stage as Ouattara's forces seized control of most of the country with the help of the UNO, with Gbagbo entrenched in Abidjan, the country's largest city. International organizations have reported numerous instances of human rights violations by both sides, in particular in the city of Duékoué
Duékoué
where Ouattara's forces killed hundreds of people. Overall casualties of the war are estimated around 3000
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2007 Lebanon Conflict
Civilian casualties: 53 killed in the fighting, 12 killed in the bombings International Red Cross: 2 killed UNIFIL: 6 soldiers killed, 2 woundedv t eCivil conflicts in Lebanon1958 Lebanon crisis Lebanese Civil War Bab al-Tabbaneh–Jabal Mohsen Dinnieh clashes Cedar Revolution 2007 Lebanon conflict 2008 conflict in Lebanon Syrian Civil War spillover in LebanonThe 2007 Lebanon conflict began when fighting broke out between Fatah al-Islam, an Islamist militant organization, and the Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) on May 20, 2007 in Nahr al-Bared, an UNRWA Palestinian refugee camp near Tripoli. It was the most severe internal fighting since Lebanon's 1975–90 civil war. The conflict revolved mostly around the siege of Nahr el-Bared, but minor clashes also occurred in the Ain al-Hilweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon and several terrorist bombings took place in and around Lebanon's capital, Beirut
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Internal Conflict In Burma
OngoingInsurgency since 1948, shortly after Myanmar gained independence from the United Kingdom Major ethnic conflicts in Kachin, Kayah, Kayin, Rakhine and Shan State In 2011, the ruling military junta concedes official rule over Myanmar Numerous ceasefires and peace agreements signed by various groups following political reforms by the government Ongoing sporadic violence between government forces and insurgent groupsTerritorial changes Autonomous self-administered zones created for ethnic minorities in 2010Belligerents Myanmar TatmadawSupported by:  China[1][2][3]  Russia[4][5][6]Former combatants: Union of Burma (1948–1962)AFPFL Military governments (1962–2011)Socialist Republic of the Union of Burma (1962–1988) Union of Myanmar (1988–2011)DKBA (1994–2010) Formerly supported by:  Yugoslavia (1952–1988)[7][8][9][10]Insurgent groups:[a] ABSDF (since 1988) Arakan
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Operation Linda Nchi
Allied victoryAl-Shabaab weakened Kenyan forces integrated into AMISOMTerritorial changes Co-ordinated forces capture Qoqani,[6] Kolbio,[7] Beledweyne,[8] Fafadun,[9] Elade,[10] Hosingo,[11] Badhadhe,[12] Baidoa,[13] El Buur,[14] Afgooye[15]Belligerents Kenya[1] TFG[1] Raskamboni Front[2]  Ethiopia[3] ASWJ[4] Azania[5] Al-ShabaabCommanders and leaders Julius Karangi[16] Leonard Ngondi[17] Mohamed Yusuf Haji[18] Hussein Arab Isse[18] Ahmed Madobe[2][19][20][21][22] Ibrahim al-Afghani[23][24] Ahmad Godane[25][not in citation given] Mukhtar Robow[26] Hassan Turki[27][28] Sheikh Aweys[29]StrengthKenya: More than 6,000 security personnel at peak, including police[30] Al-Shabaab: Total size of 3,000 "hard-core fighters", 2,000 "allied militants" at end of 2012[31]Casualties and lossesTotal: 21–72 killed, 152 injured10–31 TFG soldiers killed,[32][33] 128 injured[34] 13 KDF soldiers k
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Yemeni Crisis (2011–present)
AQAP campaign (2011–15)1st Zinjibar Dofas 1st Abyan 1st Sana'a Radda (2013) 2nd Sana'a Rescue operations Rada' Ibb 3rd Sana'aHouthi rebellion (2014–15)2nd Dammaj Amran 2nd Sana'a Houthi takeoverYemeni Civil War (2015–present)1st Shabwah Aden
Aden
Airport 4th & 5th Sana'a Ma'rib Ad Dali' Saudi-led intervention 1st Aden 2nd Abyan Lahij Saudi–Yemeni border conflict 2nd Shabwah 1st Mukalla 2nd Ta'izz Ma'rib missile strike Aden
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Short Ton
The short ton is a unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds (907.18474 kg). The term is most commonly used in the United States where it is known simply as the ton.[1]Contents1 United States 2 United Kingdom 3 International usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesUnited States[edit] In the United States, a short ton is usually known simply as a "ton",[1] without distinguishing it from the tonne (1,000 kilograms or 2,204.62262 pounds), known there as the "metric ton", or the long ton also known as the "Imperial ton" (2,240 pounds or 1,016.0469088 kilograms). There are, however, some U.S. applications where unspecified tons normally means long tons (for example, naval ships)[2] or metric tons (world grain production figures). Both the long and short ton are defined as 20 hundredweights, but a hundredweight is 100 pounds (45.359237 kg) in the U.S
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Saumur
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.City coat of arms from 1699 to 1985City coat of arms since 1986 Saumur
Saumur
(French pronunciation: ​[somyʁ]) is a commune in the Maine-et- Loire
Loire
department in western France. The historic town is located between the Loire
Loire
and Thouet
Thouet
rivers, and is surrounded by the vineyards of Saumur
Saumur
itself, Chinon, Bourgueil, Coteaux du Layon, etc
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Long Ton
Long ton,[1] also known as the imperial ton or displacement ton,[1][2] is the name for the unit called the "ton" in the avoirdupois or Imperial system of measurements. It was standardised in the thirteenth century and is used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and several other British Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
countries alongside the mass-based metric tonne defined in 1799. It is not to be confused with the short ton a unit of weight equal to 2,000 pounds (907.18474 kg) used in the United States and in Canada before metrication also referred to simply as a "ton".Contents1 Unit definition 2 Unit equivalences 3 International usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesUnit definition[edit] A long ton is defined as exactly 2,240 pounds
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Nexter
Nexter
Nexter
Systems (formerly known as GIAT Industries or Groupement des Industries de l'Armée de Terre, Army Industries Group) is a French government-owned weapons manufacturer, based in Roanne, Loire.Contents1 Group organization 2 History2.1 Merger with KMW3 Products 4 References 5 External linksGroup organization[edit] The Nexter
Nexter
group is divided in several smaller entities, with the main one being Nexter
Nexter
Systems. The other sub-companies are: Nexter
Nexter
Munitions Nexter
Nexter
Mechanics Nexter
Nexter
Electronics Nexter
Nexter
Robotics Nexter
Nexter
Training OptSys NBC Sys Euro-Shelter Mecar Simmel DifesaHistory[edit] The GIAT group was founded in 1973 by combining the industrial assets of the technical direction of Army weapons of the French Ministry of Defense
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