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Palm OS
Palm OS
Palm OS
(also known as Garnet OS) is a discontinued mobile operating system initially developed by Palm, Inc., for personal digital assistants (PDAs) in 1996. Palm OS
Palm OS
was designed for ease of use with a touchscreen-based graphical user interface. It is provided with a suite of basic applications for personal information management. Later versions of the OS have been extended to support smartphones. Several other licensees have manufactured devices powered by Palm OS. Following Palm's purchase of the Palm trademark, the currently licensed version from ACCESS was renamed Garnet OS
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USB
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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API
In computer programming, an application programming interface (API) is a set of subroutine definitions, protocols, and tools for building application software. In general terms, it is a set of clearly defined methods of communication between various software components. A good API makes it easier to develop a computer program by providing all the building blocks, which are then put together by the programmer. An API may be for a web-based system, operating system, database system, computer hardware or software library. An API specification can take many forms, but often includes specifications for routines, data structures, object classes, variables or remote calls. POSIX, Windows API and ASPI are examples of different forms of APIs
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Serial Port
In computing, a serial port is a serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time (in contrast to a parallel port).[1] Throughout most of the history of personal computers, data was transferred through serial ports to devices such as modems, terminals, and various peripherals. While such interfaces as Ethernet, FireWire, and USB
USB
all send data as a serial stream, the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-232
RS-232
standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication device. Modern computers without serial ports may require serial-to-USB converters to allow compatibility with RS-232
RS-232
serial devices. Serial ports are still used in applications such as industrial automation systems, scientific instruments, point of sale systems and some industrial and consumer products
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TCP/IP
The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite is the conceptual model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet
Internet
and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP because the foundational protocols in the suite are the Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) and the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). It is occasionally known as the Department of Defense (DoD) model, because the development of the networking method was funded by the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
through DARPA. The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite provides end-to-end data communication specifying how data should be packetized, addressed, transmitted, routed, and received
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Synchronization (computer Science)
In computer science, synchronization refers to one of two distinct but related concepts: synchronization of processes, and synchronization of data. Process synchronization refers to the idea that multiple processes are to join up or handshake at a certain point, in order to reach an agreement or commit to a certain sequence of action
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Bluetooth
Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF
UHF
radio waves in the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz[3]) from fixed and mobile devices, and building personal area networks (PANs). Invented by telecom vendor Ericsson
Ericsson
in 1994,[4] it was originally conceived as a wireless alternative to RS-232
RS-232
data cables. Bluetooth
Bluetooth
is managed by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group
Bluetooth Special Interest Group
(SIG), which has more than 30,000 member companies in the areas of telecommunication, computing, networking, and consumer electronics.[5] The IEEE standardized Bluetooth
Bluetooth
as IEEE 802.15.1, but no longer maintains the standard
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Motorola
Motorola, Inc. (/ˌmoʊtəˈroʊlə/[4]) was an American multinational telecommunications company founded on September 25, 1928, based in Schaumburg, Illinois. After having lost $4.3 billion from 2007 to 2009, the company was divided into two independent public companies, Motorola Mobility
Motorola Mobility
and Motorola Solutions
Motorola Solutions
on January 4, 2011.[5] Motorola Solutions
Motorola Solutions
is generally considered to be the direct successor to Motorola, as the reorganization was structured with Motorola Mobility being spun off.[6] Motorola Mobility
Motorola Mobility
was sold to Google
Google
in 2012, and acquired by Lenovo
Lenovo
in 2014.[7] Motorola
Motorola
designed and sold wireless network equipment such as cellular transmission base stations and signal amplifiers
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GPS
The Global Positioning System
System
(GPS), originally Navstar GPS,[1] is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States
United States
Air Force.[2] It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver
GPS receiver
anywhere on or near the Earth
Earth
where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites.[3] Obstacles such as mountains and buildings block the relatively weak GPS
GPS
signals. The GPS
GPS
does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS
GPS
positioning information
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Barcode Reader
A barcode reader (or barcode scanner) is an electronic device that can read and output printed barcodes to a computer. Like a flatbed scanner, it consists of a light source, a lens and a light sensor translating optical impulses into electrical ones. Additionally, nearly all barcode readers contain decoder circuitry analyzing the barcode's image data provided by the sensor and sending the barcode's content to the scanner's output port.Contents1 Types of barcode scanners1.1 Technology1.1.1 Pen-type Scanners 1.1.2 Laser
Laser
scanners 1.1.3 CCD readers (also known as LED scanners) 1.1.4 Camera-based readers 1.1.5 Omnidirectional barcode scanners 1.1.6 Cell phone cameras 1.1.7 Smartphones1.2 Housing2 Methods of connection2.1 Early serial interfaces 2.2 Proprietary interfaces 2.3 Keyboard wedge (e.g
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Watch
A watch is a timepiece intended to be carried or worn by a person. It is designed to keep working despite the motions caused by the person's activities. A wristwatch is designed to be worn around the wrist, attached by a watch strap or other type of bracelet. A pocket watch is designed for a person to carry in a pocket. Watches progressed in the 17th century from spring-powered clocks, which appeared as early as the 14th century. During most of its history the watch was a mechanical device, driven by clockwork, powered by winding a mainspring, and keeping time with an oscillating balance wheel. In the 1960s the electronic quartz watch was invented, which was powered by a battery and kept time with a vibrating quartz crystal. By the 1980s the quartz watch had taken over most of the market from the mechanical watch. Today most watches that are inexpensive and medium-priced, used mainly for timekeeping, have quartz movements
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Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
or WiFi (/ˈwaɪfaɪ/) is a technology for wireless local area networking with devices based on the IEEE 802.11
IEEE 802.11
standards. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
is a trademark of the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.[1] Devices that can use Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, phones and tablets, digital cameras, smart TVs, digital audio players and modern printers. Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
compatible devices can connect to the Internet
Internet
via a WLAN and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors
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Memory Card
A memory card, flash card or memory cartridge is an electronic flash memory data storage device used for storing digital information. These are commonly used in portable electronic devices, such as digital cameras, mobile phones, laptop computers, tablets, PDAs, portable media players, video game consoles, synthesizers, electronic keyboards, and digital pianos.Contents1 History 2 Data table of selected memory card formats 3 Overview of all memory card types3.1 Comparison4 Video game consoles 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] PC Cards (PCMCIA) were the first commercial memory card formats (type I cards) to come out, but are now mainly used in industrial applications and to connect I/O devices such as modems
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3Com
3Com
3Com
Corporation was a digital electronics manufacturer best known for its computer network products. The company was founded in 1979 by Robert Metcalfe, Howard Charney, Bruce Borden, and Greg Shaw and recruited Bill Krause from Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
to be its president in February 1981 when it raised its first round of venture capital. Metcalfe explained the name 3Com
3Com
was a contraction of "Computer Communication Compatibility",[2] with its focus on Ethernet
Ethernet
technology that he had co-invented, which enabled the networking of computers. 3Com
3Com
provided network interface controller and switches, routers, wireless access points and controllers, IP voice
IP voice
systems, and intrusion prevention systems. The company was based in Santa Clara, California
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U.S. Robotics Corp.
U.S. Robotics Corporation, often called USR, is a company that produces USRobotics computer modems and related products. Its initial marketing was aimed at bulletin board systems, where its high-speed HST protocol made FidoNet transfers much faster, and thus less costly. During the 1990s it became a major consumer brand with its Sportster line. The company had a reputation for high quality and support for the latest communications standards as they emerged, notably in its V.Everything line, released in 1996. With the reduced usage of analog or voiceband modems in North America in the early 21st century, USR began branching out into new markets. The company purchased Palm, Inc. for its PalmPilot PDA, but was itself purchased by 3Com soon after. 3Com spun off USR again in 2000, keeping Palm and returning USR to the now much smaller modem market. After 2004 the company is formally known as USR
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