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Palletized Load System
The Palletized Load System (PLS) is a truck-based logistics system that entered service in the United States
United States
Army in 1993. It performs line haul (long distance), local haul (short distance), unit resupply, and other missions in the tactical environment to support modernized and highly mobile combat units. It provides rapid movement of combat configured loads of ammunition and all classes of supply, shelters and containers. It mirrors similar systems in use with the British ( Demountable Rack Offload and Pickup System
Demountable Rack Offload and Pickup System
(DROPS)) and other armed forces.[3]Contents1 History 2 Palletized Load System components 3 Technical description 4 Manufacturer 5 Operational use 6 Operators 7 Other users 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 References (bibliography) 12 External linksHistory[edit] In January 1989, the U.S. Army
U.S

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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-outpu
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Detroit Diesel
Detroit
Detroit
Diesel Corporation (DDC) is an American diesel engine manufacturer headquartered in Detroit, Michigan, United States and a subsidiary of Daimler Trucks North America, itself a wholly owned subsidiary of the German Daimler AG. The company manufactures heavy-duty engines and chassis components for the on-highway and vocational commercial truck markets. Detroit
Detroit
Diesel has built more than 5 million engines since 1938[1], more than 1 million of which are still in operation worldwide
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SAE International
SAE International, initially established as the Society of Automotive Engineers, is a U.S.-based, globally active professional association and standards developing organization for engineering professionals in various industries. Principal emphasis is placed on transport industries such as automotive, aerospace, and commercial vehicles. SAE International
SAE International
has over 138,000 global members. Membership is granted to individuals, rather than companies. Aside from its standardization efforts, SAE International
SAE International
also devotes resources to projects and programs in STEM education, professional certification, and collegiate design competitions. SAE is commonly used in North America to indicate United States customary units (USCS or USC) measuring systems in automotive and construction tools. SAE is used as a tool marking to indicate that they are not metric (SI) based tools, as the two systems are incompatible
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Carbon Steel
Carbon
Carbon
steel is a steel with carbon content up to 2.1% by weight
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Yield (engineering)
The yield point is the point on a stress–strain curve that indicates the limit of elastic behavior and the beginning of plastic behavior. Yielding means the start of breaking of fibers. Yield strength
Yield strength
or yield stress is the material property defined as the stress at which a material begins to deform plastically whereas yield point is the point where nonlinear (elastic + plastic) deformation begins. Prior to the yield point the material will deform elastically and will return to its original shape when the applied stress is removed. Once the yield point is passed, some fraction of the deformation will be permanent and non-reversible. The yield point determines the limits of performance for mechanical components, since it represents the upper limit to forces that can be applied without permanent deformation
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Pascal (unit)
The pascal (symbol: Pa) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of pressure used to quantify internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus
Young's modulus
and ultimate tensile strength
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MAN KAT1
The MAN KAT1
MAN KAT1
was a family of high-mobility off-road trucks developed by MAN SE
MAN SE
for the German army.Contents1 History 2 General characteristics2.1 Design3 Variants (second generation)3.1 LKW 5 t mil gl KAT I und KAT I A1 (4×4) 3.2 LKW 7 t mil gl KAT I and KAT I A1 (6x6) 3.3 LKW 10 t mil gl KAT I (8x8) 3.4 LKW 15 t mil gl KAT I A1 (8x8)4 Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
replacement 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] In 1962 the Bundeswehr
Bundeswehr
planned to replace its fleet of vehicles, which still stemmed from the time the army had been founded. It wanted amphibious two-, three- and four-axle vehicles in the 4 to 10 ton payload range
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Four-stroke Engine
A four-stroke (also four-cycle) engine is an internal combustion (IC) engine in which the piston completes four separate strokes while turning the crankshaft. A stroke refers to the full travel of the piston along the cylinder, in either direction. The four separate strokes are termed:Intake: also known as induction or suction. This stroke of the piston begins at top dead center (T.D.C.) and ends at bottom dead center (B.D.C.). In this stroke the intake valve must be in the open position while the piston pulls an air-fuel mixture into the cylinder by producing vacuum pressure into the cylinder through its downward motion. The piston is moving down as air is being sucked in by the downward motion against the piston Compression: This stroke begins at B.D.C, or just at the end of the suction stroke, and ends at T.D.C. In this stroke the piston compresses the air-fuel mixture in preparation for ignition during the power stroke (below)
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Diesel Engine
The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel, which is injected into the combustion chamber, is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to the mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. With the fuel being injected into the air just before combustion, the dispersion of the fuel is uneven; this is called a heterogeneous air-fuel mixture
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Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power, or the rate at which work is done. There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is about 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
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Automatic Transmission
An automatic transmission, also called auto, self-shifting transmission, n-speed automatic (where n is its number of forward gear ratios), or AT, is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Like other transmission systems on vehicles, it allows an internal combustion engine, best suited to run at a relatively high rotational speed, to provide a range of speed and torque outputs necessary for vehicular travel. The number of forward gear ratios is often expressed for manual transmissions as well (e.g., 6-speed manual). The most popular form found in automobiles is the hydraulic automatic transmission. Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. This system uses a fluid coupling in place of a friction clutch, and accomplishes gear changes by hydraulically locking and unlocking a system of planetary gears
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Transfer Case
A transfer case is a part of the drivetrain of four-wheel-drive, all-wheel-drive, and other multiple powered axle vehicles. The transfer case transfers power from the transmission to the front and rear axles by means of drive shafts. It also synchronizes the difference between the rotation of the front and rear wheels, and may contain one or more sets of low range gears for off-road use.Contents1 Functions 2 Types2.1 Drive type2.1.1 Gear-driven 2.1.2 Chain-driven2.2 Housing type2.2.1 Married 2.2.2 Divorced/independent2.3 Transfer case
Transfer case
shift type2.3.1 M.S.O.F. 2.3.2 E.S.O.F.3 See also 4 ReferencesFunctions[edit]The transfer case receives power from the transmission and sends it to both the front and rear axles. This can be done with gears, hydraulics, or chain drive. On some vehicles, such as four-wheel-drive trucks or vehicles intended for off-road use, this feature is controlled by the driver
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Two-stroke Engine
A two-stroke (or two-cycle) engine is a type of internal combustion engine which completes a power cycle with two strokes (up and down movements) of the piston during only one crankshaft revolution. This is in contrast to a "four-stroke engine", which requires four strokes of the piston to complete a power cycle during two crankshaft revolutions. In a two-stroke engine, the end of the combustion stroke and the beginning of the compression stroke happen simultaneously, with the intake and exhaust (or scavenging) functions occurring at the same time. Two-stroke engines often have a high power-to-weight ratio, power being available in a narrow range of rotational speeds called the "power band"
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Global Positioning System
The Global Positioning System
System
(GPS), originally Navstar GPS,[1] is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States
United States
Air Force.[2] It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver
GPS receiver
anywhere on or near the Earth
Earth
where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites.[3] Obstacles such as mountains and buildings block the relatively weak GPS
GPS
signals. The GPS
GPS
does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS
GPS
positioning information
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Axle
An axle is a central shaft for a rotating wheel or gear. On wheeled vehicles, the axle may be fixed to the wheels, rotating with them, or fixed to the vehicle, with the wheels rotating around the axle.[1] In the former case, bearings or bushings are provided at the mounting points where the axle is supported. In the latter case, a bearing or bushing sits inside a central hole in the wheel to allow the wheel or gear to rotate around the axle. Sometimes, especially on bicycles, the latter type axle is referred to as a spindle.Contents1 Terminology 2 Vehicle axles 3 Structural features and design 4 Drive axle 5 Dead axle (lazy axle) 6 Lift axle 7 Full-floating vs semi-floating 8 See also 9 Notes 10 External linksTerminology[edit] On cars and trucks, several senses of the word axle occur in casual usage, referring to the shaft itself, its housing, or simply any transverse pair of wheels
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