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Paleo-orthodoxy
Paleo-orthodoxy (from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
παλαιός "ancient" and Koine Greek ὀρθοδοξία "correct belief") is a Protestant Christian theological movement of the late 20th and early 21st centuries which focuses on the consensual understanding of the faith among the Ecumenical councils and Church Fathers
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Geoffrey Wainwright
Geoffrey Wainwright (born 1939) is a British theologian. He has spent much of his career in the United States
United States
and currently teaches at Duke Divinity School. Wainwright has made major contributions to modern Methodist
Methodist
theology. Biography[edit] Born in Monk Bretton, Barnsley, Yorkshire, England, in 1939, Geoffrey Wainwright is an ordained minister of the British Methodist
Methodist
Church. He received his university education in Cambridge, Geneva
Geneva
and Rome. He holds the Dr. Théol. degree from Geneva
Geneva
and the D.D
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East-West Schism
The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism
Schism
and the Schism
Schism
of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Roman
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Ancient Greek
The ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in Ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BCE to the 6th century CE. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BCE), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BCE), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BCE to the 4th century CE). It is antedated in the second millennium BCE by Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
and succeeded by Medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage on its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Koine Greek
Koine Greek
Koine Greek
(UK English /ˈkɔɪniː/,[1] US English /kɔɪˈneɪ/, /ˈkɔɪneɪ/ or /kiːˈniː/;[2][3]), also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during Hellenistic and Roman antiquity and the early Byzantine era, or Late Antiquity. It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries
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Christian Theology
Christian
Christian
theology is the theology of Christian
Christian
belief and practice.[1] Such study concentrates primarily upon the texts of the Old Testament
Old Testament
and of the New Testament, as well as on Christian tradition. Christian
Christian
theologians use biblical exegesis, rational analysis and argument
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Ecumenical Council
An ecumenical council (or oecumenical council; also general council)[1] is a conference of ecclesiastical dignitaries and theological experts convened to discuss and settle matters of Church doctrine and practice in which those entitled to vote are convoked from the whole world (oikoumene) and which secures the approbation of the whole Church.[2] The word "ecumenical" derives from the Late Latin oecumenicus "general, universal", from Greek oikoumenikos "from the whole world", from he oikoumene ge "the inhabited world (as known to the ancient Greeks); the Greeks and their neighbors considered as developed human society (as opposed to barbarian lands)", in later use "the Roman world" and in the Christian sense in ecclesiastical Greek, from oikoumenos, present passive participle of oikein "inhabit", from oikos "house, habitation."[3] The first seven
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Church Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church
Early Church
Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops. The term is used of writers or teachers of the Church not necessarily ordained[1] and not necessarily "saints"— Origen
Origen
Adamantius and Tertullian
Tertullian
are often considered Church Fathers, but are not saints, owing to their views later being deemed heretical.[2] Most Church Fathers are honored as saints in the Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Lutheranism, as well as other churches and groups
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Eastern Orthodox Church
Autocephaly
Autocephaly
recognized universally de facto, by some Autocephalous Churches de jure. Canonicity mostly recognized:AmericaPartially recognized autocephaly by Constantinople
Constantinople
and the Church of Greece
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Catholic Church
GodTrinity Pater Filius Spiritus Sanctus Consubstantialitas Filioque Divinum illud munusDivine Law Decalogus Ex Cathedra DeificatioRealms beyond the States of the Church Heaven Purgatory Limbo HellMysterium Fidei Passion of Jesus Crucifixion
Crucifixion
of Jesus Harrowing of Hell Resurrection AscensionBeatæ Mariæ Semper Virginis Mariology Veneration Immaculate Conception Mater Dei Perpetual virginity Assumption TitlesOther teachings Josephology Morality Body Lectures Sexuality Apologetics Divine grace Salvation Original sin Saints DogmaTexts Biblia Sacra S
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Vincent Of Lérins
Saint Vincent of Lérins (Latin: Vincentius) who died c. 445, was a Gallic monk and author of early Christian writings. One example was the Commonitorium, c. 434, which offers guidance in the orthodox teaching of Christianity. A proponent of semipelagianism, he opposed the Augustinian model of Grace and was probably the recipient of Prosper of Aquitaine's Responsiones ad Capitula Objectionum Vincentianarum.[3] His feast day is celebrated on 24 May.Contents1 Personal life 2 Commonitory 3 Semipelagianism 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksPersonal life[edit] Saint Vincent of Lérins was born in Toulouse, Gaul[4] to a noble family, and is believed to be the brother of St. Lupus of Troyes.[3] In his early life he engaged in secular pursuits; it is unclear whether these were civil or military, though the term he uses, "secularis militia", may imply the latter
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United Methodist
12,719,550 (6,951,278 in the U.S.)[8]Ministers 83,800Aid organization United Methodist
Methodist
Committee on ReliefSecondary schools 10Tertiary institutions 109Official website umc.orgThe United Methodist
Methodist
Church is a mainline Protestant
Protestant
denomination and a major part of Methodism. In the 19th century, its main predecessor—the Methodist
Methodist
Episcopal Church—was a leader in Evangelicalism. The present denomination was founded in 1968 in Dallas, Texas
Dallas, Texas
by union of the Methodist
Methodist
Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church
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Robert Jenson
Robert W. Jenson (2 August 1930 – 5 September 2017) was a leading American Lutheran
Lutheran
and ecumenical theologian. Contents1 Student years 2 Early career 3 Later career 4 Works4.1 Authored Works 4.2 Edited Works5 References 6 External linksStudent years[edit] Jenson studied classics and philosophy at Luther College in the late 1940s, before beginning theological studies at Luther Seminary
Luther Seminary
in 1951. Due to a car accident he missed most of his first-year seminary studies, and during that year he immersed himself in the works of Kant and Kierkegaard
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David Mills (editor)
David Mills (born 1957) is an American editor and writer who is known for his work within Christian media. He was the executive editor of the journal First Things and was the editor of Touchstone magazine from 2003 to 2008. Biography[edit] An activist in the conservative Episcopal movement, he was a long-time member of the board of the Evangelical and Catholic Mission
Evangelical and Catholic Mission
and of its successors the Episcopal Synod of America
Episcopal Synod of America
and Forward in Faith, editing the groups' theological The Evangelical Catholic from 1986 to 1998. He was also a member of the board of NOEL (the National Organization of Episcopalians for Life)
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Robert E. Webber
Robert Eugene Webber (November 27, 1933 – April 27, 2007) was an American theologian known for his work on worship and the early church. He played a key role in the Convergence Movement, a movement among evangelical and charismatic churches in the United States
United States
to blend charismatic worship with liturgies from the Book of Common Prayer and other liturgical sources.Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Education 4 Theological Influence 5 Partial bibliography 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] The son of a Baptist
Baptist
minister, Webber was raised for the first seven years of his life the small village, Mitulu, in the Belgian Congo where his parents were missionaries with the Africa Inland Mission.The Webber family had three children, Robert, an older sister and a younger brother
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Thomas C. Oden
Thomas Clark Oden (October 21, 1931 – December 8, 2016) was an American United Methodist theologian and religious author. He is often regarded as the father of the paleo-orthodox movement and is considered to be one of the most influential theologians of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century. He was Henry Anson Buttz Professor of Theology and Ethics at Drew University
Drew University
in New Jersey from 1980 until his retirement in 2004. He remained faculty emeritus until his death.[1] Life[edit] Oden was born in Altus, Oklahoma, the son of an attorney and music teacher. As a youth, he considered two vocations: lawyer or Methodist minister. At age ten, Oden’s family moved to Oklahoma City
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