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Page, Arizona
Page is a city in Coconino County, Arizona, United States, near the Glen Canyon Dam
Glen Canyon Dam
and Lake Powell. As of the 2010 census, the population of the city was 7,247.[4]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics 4 Education 5 Economy5.1 Top employers6 Transportation 7 Media 8 Films and Television 9 Literature 10 Notable people 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Unlike other cities in the area, Page was founded in 1957 as a housing community for workers and their families during the construction of nearby Glen Canyon Dam
Glen Canyon Dam
on the Colorado River. Its 17-square-mile (44 km2) site was obtained in a land exchange with the Navajo Nation. The city is perched atop Manson Mesa at an elevation of 4,300 feet (1,300 m) above sea level and 600 feet (180 m) above Lake Powell. The city was originally called Government Camp, but was later named for John C
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City
A city is a large human settlement.[4][5] Cities generally have extensive systems for housing, transportation, sanitation, utilities, land use, and communication. Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization, roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability.[6] Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas—creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification
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1990 United States Census
The Twenty-first United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.[1] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1990 census, which contained over 100 questions. Full documentation on the 1990 census, including census forms and a procedural history, is available from the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. It was the first census to designate "Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander" as a racial group separate from Asians. To increase black participation in the 1990 United States
United States
Census, the bureau recruited Bill Cosby, Magic Johnson, Alfre Woodard, and Miss America Debbye Turner
Debbye Turner
as spokespeople.[2] The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series
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Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
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Great Basin Desert
Nevada, Utah, California
California
and Idaho
Idaho
and OregonConservationHabitat loss 90%[3]Protected 76.62%[2]The Great Basin
Great Basin
Desert
Desert
is part of the Great Basin
Great Basin
between the Sierra Nevada
Nevada
and the Wasatch Range. The desert is a geographical region that largely overlaps the Great Basin
Great Basin
shrub steppe defined by the World Wildlife Fund, and the Central Basin and Range ecoregion defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
and United States Geological Survey. It is a temperate desert with hot, dry summers and snowy winters.[4] The desert spans a large part of the state of Nevada, and extends into western Utah, eastern California, and Idaho
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Colorado Plateau
The Colorado
Colorado
Plateau, also known as the Colorado
Colorado
Plateau
Plateau
Province,[1] is a physiographic and desert region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners
Four Corners
region of the southwestern United States. This province covers an area of 337,000 km2 (130,000 mi2) within western Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, southern and eastern Utah, and northern Arizona. About 90% of the area is drained by the Colorado
Colorado
River and its main tributaries: the Green, San Juan, and Little Colorado. Most of the remainder of the plateau is drained by the Rio Grande
Rio Grande
and its tributaries.[2][3]:395 The Colorado
Colorado
Plateau
Plateau
is largely made up of high desert, with scattered areas of forests
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North American Monsoon
The North American monsoon, variously known as the Southwest monsoon, the Mexican monsoon, the New Mexican monsoon, or the Arizona monsoon,[1] is a pattern of pronounced increase in thunderstorms and rainfall over large areas of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico, typically occurring between July and mid September. During the monsoon, thunderstorms are fueled by daytime heating and build up during the late afternoon-early evening. Typically, these storms dissipate by late night, and the next day starts out fair, with the cycle repeating daily. The monsoon typically loses its energy by mid-September when drier and cooler conditions are reestablished over the region
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Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
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1960 United States Census
The Eighteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 179,323,175, an increase of 18.5 percent over the 151,325,798 persons enumerated during the 1950 Census.Contents1 Data availability 2 State rankings 3 City rankings 4 Notes 5 External linksData availability[edit] Microdata from the 1960 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System
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1970 United States Census
The Nineteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 203,392,031, an increase of 13.4 percent over the 179,323,175 persons enumerated during the 1960 Census.Contents1 Data availability 2 State rankings 3 City rankings 4 Conclusions 5 Notes 6 External linksData availability[edit] Microdata from the 1970 census are freely available through the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series. Aggregate data for small areas, together with electronic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System. These data were originally created and disseminated by DUALabs
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1980 United States Census
The Twentieth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 226,545,805, an increase of 11.4 percent over the 203,184,772 persons enumerated during the 1970 Census.[1]Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 References 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] The 1980 census collected the following information from all respondents:[2]Address Name Household relationship Sex Race Age Marital status Whether of Spanish/Hispanic origin or descentIt was the first census not to ask for the name of the "head of household."[3] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 1980 census, which contained over 100 questions
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2000 United States Census
[[File:Seal of the United States Census
United States Census
Bur tion = U.S. Census Bureau Sealframeless]]Census LogoGeneral informationCountry United StatesDate taken April 1, 2000Total population 281,421,906Percent change 13.2%Most populous state California 33,871,648Least populous state Wyoming 493,782The Twenty-second United States
United States
Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census.[1] This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.[2] Approximately 16 percent of households received a "long form" of the 2000 census, which contained over 100 questions
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Race (United States Census)
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Race and ethnicity in the United States
Census, defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget
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Per Capita Income
Per capita income or average income measures the average income earned per person in a given area (city, region, country, etc.) in a specified year. It is calculated by dividing the area's total income by its total population.[1][2]Contents1 As a measure of prosperity1.1 United States2 Critics 3 See also 4 ReferencesAs a measure of prosperity[edit] Per capita income is national income/total population. Per capita income is often used to measure an area's average income. This is used to see the wealth of the population with those of others. Per capita income is often used to measure a country's standard of living
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Poverty Line
The poverty threshold, poverty limit or poverty line is the minimum level of income deemed adequate in a particular country.[1] In practice, like the definition of poverty, the official or common understanding of the poverty line is significantly higher in developed countries than in developing countries.[2][3] In 2008, the World Bank came out with a figure (revised largely due to inflation) of $1.25 a day at 2005 purchasing-power parity (PPP).[4] In October 2015, the World Bank
World Bank
updated the international poverty line to $1.90 a day. The new figure of $1.90 is based on ICP purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations and represents the international equivalent of what $1.90 could buy in the US in 2011. The new IPL replaces the $1.25 per day figure, which used 2005 data
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