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Packard
Packard was an American luxury automobile marque built by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan, United States. The first Packard automobiles were produced in 1899, and the last true Packard in 1956, when they built the Packard Predictor, their last concept car. Packard bought Studebaker in 1953 and formed Studebaker-Packard Corporation of South Bend, Indiana
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Shock Absorber
A shock absorber or damper is a mechanical or hydraulic device designed to absorb and damp shock impulses. It does this by converting the kinetic energy of the shock into another form of energy (typically heat) which is then dissipated
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Rebadging
Badge engineering, sometimes called rebadging, is the practice of applying a different badge or trademark (brand, logo or manufacturer's name/make/marque) to an existing product (e.g., an automobile) and subsequently marketing the variant as a distinct product. Due to the high cost of designing and engineering a new model or establishing a brand (which may take many years to gain acceptance), economies of scale make it less expensive to rebadge a product once or multiple times than to create different models. The term badge engineering is an intentionally ironic misnomer, in that little or no actual engineering takes place. The term originated with the practice of replacing an automobile's emblems to create an ostensibly new model sold by a different maker
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordin
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Black Motor Company
The Black was a brass era United States automobile, built at 124 East Ohio Street, Chicago, Illinois, in 1906. It was a high wheeler buggy priced at a surprisingly low US$375-$450, when
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Grand Boulevard (Detroit)
A boulevard (French, from Dutch: Bolwerk – bulwark, meaning bastion), often abbreviated Blvd, is a type of large road, usually running through a city. In modern American usage it often means a wide, multi-lane arterial thoroughfare, often divided with a median down the centre, and perhaps with roadways along each side designed as slow travel and parking lanes and for bicycle and pedestrian usage, often with an above-average quality of landscaping and scenery.

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Steering Wheel
A steering wheel (also called a driving wheel or a hand wheel) is a type of steering control in vehicles. Steering wheels are used in most modern land vehicles, including all mass-production automobiles, as well as buses, light and heavy trucks, and tractors. The steering wheel is the part of the steering system that is manipulated by the driver; the rest of the steering system responds to such driver inputs
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Alexander Winton
Alexander Winton (June 20, 1860 – June 21, 1932) was a Scottish-American bicycle, automobile and diesel engine designer and inventor
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Buffalo, New York
Buffalo is the second largest city in the U.S. state of New York and the largest city in Western New York. As of 2018, the population was 256,304. The city is the county seat of Erie County and a major gateway for commerce and travel across the Canada–United States border, forming part of the bi-national Buffalo Niagara Region. The Buffalo area was inhabited before the 17th century by the Native American Iroquois tribe and later by French colonizers. The city grew significantly in the 19th and 20th centuries as a result of immigration, the construction of the Erie Canal and rail transportation, and its close proximity to Lake Erie. This growth provided an abundance of fresh water and an ample trade route to the Midwestern United States while grooming its economy for the grain, steel and automobile industries that dominated the city's economy in the 20th century
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United States Dollar
The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the Coinage Act of 1792. One dollar is divided into 100 cents (Symbol: ¢) or 1000 mills (for accounting purposes and for taxing. Symbol: ₥). The Coinage Act of 1792 created a decimal currency by creating the following coins: tenth dollar, one-twentieth dollar, one-hundredth dollar. In addition the act created the dollar, half dollar, and quarter dollar coins. All of these coins are still minted in 2020. In addition, several forms of paper money were introduced by Congress over the years. The latest of these, the Federal Reserve Note, was authorized by the Federal Reserve Act of 1913, while all existing U.S. currency remains legal tender. Issuance of the previous form of the currency (U.S
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Cleveland, Ohio
Cleveland (/ˈklvlənd/ KLEEV-lənd) is a city in the U.S. state of Ohio, and the county seat of Cuyahoga County, the state's second most-populous county. Located along Lake Erie, the city proper has a population of 388,072, making Cleveland the 51st largest city in the United States, and the second-largest city in Ohio after Columbus. Greater Cleveland ranked as the 32nd-largest metropolitan area in the United States, with 2,055,612 people in 2016. The city anchors the Cleveland–Akron–Canton Combined Statistical Area, which had a population of 3,515,646 in 2010 and ranks 15th in the United States. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie, approximately 60 miles (100 kilometers) west of the Pennsylvania state border. It was founded by European Americans in 1796 near the mouth of the Cuyahoga River
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South Bend, Indiana
South Bend is a city in and the county seat of St. Joseph County, Indiana, United States, on the St. Joseph River near its southernmost bend, from which it derives its name. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total of 101,168 residents; its Metropolitan Statistical Area had a population of 318,586 and Combined Statistical Area of 721,296. It is the fourth-largest city in Indiana, serving as the economic and cultural hub of Northern Indiana. The highly ranked University of Notre Dame is located just to the north in unincorporated Notre Dame, Indiana and is an integral contributor to the region's economy. The area was originally settled in the early 19th century by fur traders and was established as a city in 1865. The St. Joseph River shaped South Bend's economy through the mid-20th century
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New York City
New York City (NYC), also known as the City of New York or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States
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