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PC DOS
IBM
IBM
PC DOS
DOS
(an acronym for IBM
IBM
personal computer disk operating system) is a discontinued operating system for the IBM
IBM
Personal Computer, manufactured and sold by IBM
IBM
from the early 1980s into the 2000s. Before version 6.1, PC DOS
DOS
was an IBM-branded version of MS-DOS
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Rebranded
Rebranding
Rebranding
is a marketing strategy in which a new name, term, symbol, design, or combination thereof is created for an established brand with the intention of developing a new, differentiated identity in the minds of consumers, investors, competitors, and other stakeholders.[1] Often, this involves radical changes to a brand's logo, name, legal names, image, marketing strategy, and advertising themes. Such changes typically aim to reposition the brand/company, occasionally to distance itself from negative connotations of the previous branding, or to move the brand upmarket; they may also communicate a new message a new board of directors wishes to communicate. Rebranding
Rebranding
can be applied to new products, mature products, or even products still in development
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Acronym
An acronym is a word or name formed as an abbreviation from the initial components in a phrase or a word, usually individual letters (as in NATO
NATO
or laser) and sometimes syllables (as in Benelux). There are no universal standards of the multiple names for such abbreviations and of their orthographic styling. In English and most other languages, such abbreviations historically had limited use, but they became much more common in the 20th century
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Byte (magazine)
Byte
Byte
was an American microcomputer magazine, influential in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s because of its wide-ranging editorial coverage.[1] Whereas many magazines from the mid-1980s had been dedicated to the MS-DOS
MS-DOS
(PC) platform or the Mac, mostly from a business or home user's perspective, Byte
Byte
covered developments in the entire field of "small computers and software", and sometimes other computing fields such as supercomputers and high-reliability computing. Coverage was in-depth with much technical detail, rather than user-oriented. Byte
Byte
started in 1975, shortly after the first personal computers appeared as kits advertised in the back of electronics magazines. Byte was published monthly, with an initial yearly subscription price of $10
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Boca Raton, Florida
Boca Raton (/ˌboʊkə rəˈtoʊn/;[8][9] Spanish: Boca Ratón, pronounced [ˈboka raˈton]) is the southernmost city in Palm Beach County, Florida, United States, first incorporated on August 2, 1924[10] as "Bocaratone,"[11] and then incorporated as "Boca Raton" in 1925. The 2015 population estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau
U.S. Census Bureau
was 93,235.[4] However, approximately 200,000 people with a Boca Raton postal address reside outside its municipal boundaries.[12] Such areas include newer developments like West Boca Raton. As a business center, the city also experiences significant daytime population increases. It is one of the wealthiest communities in South Florida
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Paul Allen
Paul Gardner Allen (born January 21, 1953) is an American business magnate, investor and philanthropist. He co-founded Microsoft alongside Bill Gates. In June 2017, he was estimated to be the 46th-richest person in the world, with an estimated net worth of $21.1 billion.[2] Allen is the founder and Chairman[3] of Vulcan Inc., which manages his various business and philanthropic efforts
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Floppy Disks
A floppy disk, also called a floppy, diskette, or just disk, is a type of disk storage composed of a disk of thin and flexible magnetic storage medium, sealed in a rectangular plastic enclosure lined with fabric that removes dust particles
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Tim Paterson
Tim Paterson (born 1956) is an American computer programmer, best known for creating 86-DOS, an operating system for the Intel 8086. This system emulated the API of CP/M, which was created by Gary Kildall. 86-DOS
86-DOS
later formed the basis of MS-DOS, the most widely used personal computer operating system in the 1980s. Biography[edit] Paterson was educated in the Seattle Public Schools, graduating from Ingraham High School
Ingraham High School
in 1974. He attended the University of Washington, working as a repair technician for The Retail Computer Store in the Green Lake area of Seattle, Washington, and graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Computer Science[1] in June 1978
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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Mark Zbikowski
Mark "Zibo" Joseph Zbikowski (born March 21, 1956) is a former Microsoft
Microsoft
Architect and an early computer hacker. He started working at the company only a few years after its inception, leading efforts in MS-DOS, OS/2, Cairo and Windows NT. In 2006 he was honored for 25 years of service with the company, the third employee to reach this milestone, after Bill Gates
Bill Gates
and Steve Ballmer.[citation needed] He is currently a technical adviser to several companies and a PhD student at the University of Washington. He was the designer of the MS-DOS
MS-DOS
executable file format, and the headers of that file format start with his initials: the ASCII characters 'MZ' (0x4D, 0x5A).[1]Contents1 Early years 2 Microsoft 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEarly years[edit] Zbikowski was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1956
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Megabyte
The megabyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. Its recommended unit symbol is MB. The unit prefix mega is a multiplier of 1000000 (106) in the International System of Units (SI).[1] Therefore, one megabyte is one million bytes of information. This definition has been incorporated into the International System of Quantities. However, in the computer and information technology fields, several other definitions are used that arose for historical reasons of convenience. A common usage has been to designate one megabyte as 1048576bytes (220 B), a measurement that conveniently expresses the binary multiples inherent in digital computer memory architectures. However, most standards bodies have deprecated this usage in favor of a set of binary prefixes,[2] in which this quantity is designated by the unit mebibyte (MiB)
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Unix
Unix
Unix
(/ˈjuːnɪks/; trademarked as UNIX) is a family of multitasking, multiuser computer operating systems that derive from the original AT&T Unix, development starting in the 1970s at the Bell Labs research center by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, and others.[3] Initially intended for use inside the Bell System, AT&T licensed Unix
Unix
to outside parties in the late 1970s, leading to a variety of both academic and commercial Unix
Unix
variants from vendors like the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(BSD), Microsoft
Microsoft
(Xenix), IBM (AIX), and Sun Microsystems
Sun Microsystems
(Solaris)
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Windows XP
Windows XP
Windows XP
(codenamed Whistler) is a personal computer operating system that was produced by Microsoft
Microsoft
as part of the Windows NT
Windows NT
family of operating systems. It was released to manufacturing on August 24, 2001, and broadly released for retail sale on October 25, 2001. Development of Windows XP
Windows XP
began in the late 1990s as "Neptune", an operating system built on the Windows NT
Windows NT
kernel which was intended specifically for mainstream consumer use. An updated version of Windows 2000
Windows 2000
was also originally planned for the business market; however, in January 2000, both projects were shelved in favor of a single OS codenamed "Whistler", which would serve as a single OS platform for both consumer and business markets
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Windows NT
Windows NT
Windows NT
is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. It is a processor-independent, multiprocessing, multi-user operating system. The first version of Windows NT
Windows NT
was Windows NT 3.1
Windows NT 3.1
and was produced for workstations and server computers. It was intended to complement consumer versions of Windows that were based on MS-DOS
MS-DOS
(including Windows 1.0
Windows 1.0
through Windows 3.1x). Gradually, the Windows NT
Windows NT
family was expanded into Microsoft's general-purpose operating system product line for all personal computers, deprecating the Windows 9x
Windows 9x
family. "NT" formerly expanded to "New Technology" but no longer carries any specific meaning
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IBM PC Network
The IBM
IBM
PC Network was IBM's first LAN system.[1][2] It consisted of network cards, cables, and a small device driver known as NetBIOS (Network Basic Input/Output System). It used a data rate of 2 Mbit/s.Contents1 Broadband 2 Baseband 3 See also 4 ReferencesBroadband[edit] The original broadband version in 1984 communicated over 75 Ω RG-11-type cable using frequency-division multiplexing, so traffic travelled on separate transmit and receive frequency ranges, using a Sytek head-end device to translate between the two signals, and it was intended that the cable be shared, with video and voice traffic using other bands. It ran at 2 Mbit/s. NetBIOS was developed by Sytek Inc as an API for software communication over this IBM
IBM
PC Network LAN technology; with Sytek networking protocols being used for communication over the wire
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IBM PC Convertible
The IBM PC Convertible is the first laptop computer released by IBM. Released on April 3, 1986, the Convertible was also the first IBM computer to use the 3½-inch floppy disk format which went on to become the industry standard. Like modern laptops, it featured power management and the ability to run from batteries. It was the follow-up to the IBM Portable and was model number 5140. It was replaced in 1991 by the IBM PS/2 L40 SX, and in Japan by the IBM Personal System/55note, which was the predecessor to the ThinkPad.Contents1 Predecessors 2 Description 3 Reception 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPredecessors[edit] IBM engineers in 1983 reportedly developed a Tandy Model 100-like laptop, codenamed "Sweetpea", which Don Estridge rejected for not being PC compatible
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