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Georgia(country)
Coordinates: 42°00′N 43°30′E / 42.000°N 43.500°E / 42.000; 43.500 Today transport in Georgia is provided by rail, road, ferry, and Today transport in Georgia is provided by rail, road, ferry, and air. Total length of roads excluding occupied territories is 20,553 kilometers and railways – 1,576 km.[214] Positioned in the Caucasus and on the coast of the Black Sea, Georgia is a key country through which energy imports to the European Union from neighbouring Azerbaijan pass. Traditionally, the country was located on an important north–south trade route between European Russia and the Near East and Turkey.[citation needed] In recent years Georgia has invested large amounts of money in the modernization of its transport networks
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Bolsheviks

The Bolsheviks (Russian: Большевики, from большинство bolshinstvo, 'majority'),[a] also known in English as the Bolshevists,[2][b] were a radical, far-left, and revolutionary Marxist faction founded by Vladimir Lenin and Alexander Bogdanov that split from the Menshevik faction[c] of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (RSDLP), a revolutionary socialist political party formed in 1898, at its Second Party Congress in 1903.[4] After forming their own party in 1912, the Bolsheviks took power during the October Revolution in the Russian Republic in November 1917, overthrowing the Provisional Government of Alexander Kerensky, and became the only ruling party in the subsequent Soviet Russia and its successor state, the Soviet Union. They considered themselves the leaders of the revolutionary proletariat of Russia
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Pratt & Whitney R-1830

The Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp is an American aircraft engine widely used in the 1930s and 1940s. Produced by Pratt & Whitney, it is a two-row, 14-cylinder, air-cooled radial design with seven cylinders on a row. It displaces 1,830 cu in (30.0 L) and its bore and stroke are both 5.5 in (140 mm). A total of 173,618 R-1830 engines were built,[1] and from their use in two of the most-produced aircraft ever built, the four-engined B-24 heavy bomber and twin-engined DC-3 transport, more Twin Wasps may have been built than any other aviation piston engine in history. A "bored-out" version (to a 5.75 inch/146 mm cylinder bore) with a slightly higher power rating and other slight changes in detail design was produced as the R-2000. Mostly retired today, it is still used on Douglas DC-3 and various museum aircraft and warbirds seen at airshows
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Cockpit
A cockpit or flight deck is the area, usually near the front of an aircraft or spacecraft, from which a pilot controls the aircraft. The word cockpit seems to have been used as a nautical term in the 17th century, without reference to cock fighting. It referred to an area in the rear of a ship where the cockswain's station was located, the cockswain being the pilot of a smaller "boat" that could be dispatched from the ship to board another ship or to bring people ashore. The word "cockswain" in turn derives from the old English terms for "boat-servant" (coque is the French word for "shell"; and swain was old English for boy or servant).[3] The midshipmen and master's mates were later berthed in the cockpit, and it served as the action station for the ship's surgeon and his mates during battle. Thus by the 18th century, "cockpit" had come to designate an area in the rear lower deck of a warship where the wounded were taken
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