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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Architecture Of England
The architecture of England
England
is the architecture of modern England
England
and in the historic Kingdom of England. It often includes buildings created under English influence or by English architects in other parts of the world, particularly in the English and later British colonies and Empire, which developed into the Commonwealth of Nations. Apart from Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
architecture, the major forms of non-vernacular architecture employed in England
England
before 1900 originated elsewhere in western Europe, chiefly in France and Italy, while 20th-century Modernist architecture
Modernist architecture
derived from both European and American influences. Each of these foreign modes became assimilated within English architectural culture and gave rise to local variation and innovation, producing distinctive national forms
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Metropolitan Area
A metropolitan area, sometimes referred to as a metro area or commuter belt, is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industry, infrastructure, and housing.[1] A metro area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions and municipalities: neighborhoods, townships, boroughs, cities, towns, exurbs, suburbs, counties, districts, states, and even nations like the eurodistricts
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English-speaking World
Approximately 330 to 360 million people speak English as their first language.[1] The United States
United States
has the most native speakers at 258 million. Additionally, there are 60 million native English speakers in the United Kingdom, 19 million in Canada, 16.5 million in Australia, 4.5 million in Ireland, and 3.8 million in New Zealand. Other countries also use English as their primary and official languages. English is the third largest language by number of native speakers, after Mandarin and Spanish.[2] Estimates that include second language speakers vary greatly, from 470 million to more than 1 billion
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British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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ONS Coding System
In the United Kingdom, the Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
maintains a series of codes to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data. These codes are referred to as ONS codes or GSS codes referring to the Government Statistical Service of which ONS is part. The previous hierarchical system of codes has been replaced as from January 2011[1] by a nine-character code for all types of geography, in which there is no relation between the code for a lower-tier area and the corresponding parent area
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ISO 3166-2
ISO 3166-2 is part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO), and defines codes for identifying the principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states) of all countries coded in ISO 3166-1. The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 2: Country subdivision
Country subdivision
code. It was first published in 1998. The purpose of ISO 3166-2 is to establish an international standard of short and unique alphanumeric codes to represent the relevant administrative divisions and dependent territories of all countries in a more convenient and less ambiguous form than their full names
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-07T11:14:27+01:00.Contents1
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST), civil time in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and Portugal
Portugal
is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+0 to UTC+1), so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union
European Union
have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 CET, which is 01:00 GMT)
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UTC0
UTC±00:00 is the following time: Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the basis for the world's civil time. Western European Time
Western European Time
(Ireland,
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Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
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British Mixed
Mixed is an ethnicity category that has been used by the United Kingdom's Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
since the 1991 Census. Colloquially it refers to British citizens or residents whose parents are of two or more different races or ethnic backgrounds
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Other White
The term Other White is a classification of ethnicity in the United Kingdom and has been used in documents such as the 2011 UK Census
2011 UK Census
to describe people who self-identify as white persons who are not of the English, Welsh, Scottish or Irish ethnic groupings. The category does not comprise a single ethnic group but is instead a method of identification for white people who are not represented by other white census categories. This means that the Other White group contains a diverse collection of people with different countries of birth, languages and religions
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White British
White British is an ethnicity classification used in the 2011 United Kingdom Census. As a result of the 2011 census the White British population stood at 51,736,290 (81.9% of the UK total population).[1][2][3] (NB. This total includes the population estimate for Northern Ireland, where only the term 'White' is used in ethnic classification
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Other Ethnic Group (United Kingdom Census)
A number of different systems of classification of ethnicity in the United Kingdom exist. These schemata have been the subject of debate, including about the nature of ethnicity, how or whether it can be categorised, and the relationship between ethnicity, race, and nationality.Contents1 National statistics1.1 History and debate 1.2 Self-definition 1.3 Ethnicity
Ethnicity
categories2 Police 3 Schools 4 Healthcare 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksNational statistics[edit]The ethnic group question used in the 2011 census in England. In Wales, "Welsh" and "English" were listed in the opposite order of the "White" column
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