HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Owen Jones (architect)
OWEN JONES (15 February 1809 – 19 April 1874) was an English-born Welsh architect. A versatile architect and designer, he was also one of the most influential design theorists of the nineteenth century. He helped pioneer modern color theory , and his theories on flat patterning and ornament still resonate with contemporary designers today. He rose to prominence with his studies of Islamic decoration at the Alhambra
Alhambra
, and the associated publication of his drawings, which pioneered new standards in chromolithography . Jones was a pivotal figure in the formation of the South Kensington Museum
South Kensington Museum
(later to become the V&A ) through his close association with Henry Cole , the museum's first director, and another key figure in 19th century design reform. Jones was also responsible for the interior decoration and layout of exhibits for the Great Exhibition
Great Exhibition
building of 1851, and for its later incarnation at Sydenham . Jones advised on the foundation collections for the South Kensington
South Kensington
museum, and formulated decorative arts principles which became teaching frameworks for the Government School of Design , then at Marlborough House
Marlborough House

[...More...]

"Owen Jones (architect)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Royal Academy Schools
The ROYAL ACADEMY OF ARTS (RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House on Piccadilly in London. It has a unique position as an independent, privately funded institution led by eminent artists and architects; its purpose is to promote the creation, enjoyment and appreciation of the visual arts through exhibitions, education and debate. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Activities * 3 Royal Academy Schools * 4 Library, archive, and collections * 4.1 Wall and ceiling paintings * 4.2 Michelangelo\'s Taddei Tondo * 5 War memorials * 6 Membership * 7 See also * 8 References and sources * 9 Further reading * 10 External links HISTORYThe Royal Academy of Arts was founded through a personal act of King George III on 10 December 1768 with a mission to promote the arts of design in Britain through education and exhibition. The motive in founding the Academy was twofold: to raise the professional status of the artist by establishing a sound system of training and expert judgement in the arts, and to arrange the exhibition of contemporary works of art attaining an appropriate standard of excellence. Supporters wanted to foster a national school of art and to encourage appreciation and interest in the public based on recognised canons of good taste
[...More...]

"Royal Academy Schools" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

The Crystal Palace
THE CRYSTAL PALACE was a cast-iron and plate-glass structure originally built in Hyde Park, London , to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. More than 14,000 exhibitors from around the world gathered in its 990,000-square-foot (92,000 m2) exhibition space to display examples of technology developed in the Industrial Revolution . Designed by Joseph Paxton , the Great Exhibition building was 1,851 feet (564 m) long, with an interior height of 128 feet (39 m). The invention of the cast plate glass method in 1848 made possible the production of large sheets of cheap but strong glass, and its use in the Crystal Palace created a structure with the greatest area of glass ever seen in a building and astonished visitors with its clear walls and ceilings that did not require interior lights. The name of the building resulted from a piece penned by the playwright Douglas Jerrold , who in July 1850 wrote in the satirical magazine _Punch _ about the forthcoming Great Exhibition, referring to a "palace of very crystal". After the exhibition, it was decided to relocate the Palace to an area of South London to be rebuilt on Penge Common, at the top of Penge Peak next to Sydenham Hill , an affluent suburb of large villas. It stood there from 1854 until its destruction by fire in 1936
[...More...]

"The Crystal Palace" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sydenham
SYDENHAM (/ˈsɪdnəm/ ) is a district within the south east London Boroughs of Lewisham
Lewisham
, Bromley
Bromley
and Southwark
Southwark
. Prior to the creation of the County of London in 1889, Sydenham
Sydenham
was located in Kent
Kent
, bordering Surrey
Surrey
. Historically, the area was very affluent, with the Crystal Palace being relocated to Sydenham Hill
Sydenham Hill
in 1854. Today Sydenham
Sydenham
is a diverse area, with a population of 28,378 (2011 census) and borders Forest Hill , Dulwich , Crystal Palace , Penge , Beckenham , Catford and Bellingham . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Local area * 2.1 Commercial area * 2.2 Community * 2.3 Conservation areas * 2.4 Recreation * 2.5 Sydenham
Sydenham
Arts * 2.6 Notable buildings and structures * 3 Education * 4 Population * 4.1 Famous residents * 5 Transport * 5.1 Railway stations * 5.2 Buses * 5.3 Roads * 6 Geography * 6.1 Climate * 6.2 Location * 7 Trivia * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 External links HISTORY A map showing the Sydenham
Sydenham
ward of Lewisham
Lewisham
Metropolitan Borough as it appeared in 1916
[...More...]

"Sydenham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Exhibition
The GREAT EXHIBITION OF THE WORKS OF INDUSTRY OF ALL NATIONS or THE GREAT EXHIBITION, sometimes referred to as the CRYSTAL PALACE EXHIBITION in reference to the temporary structure in which it was held, was an international exhibition that took place in Hyde Park , London, from 1 May to 15 October 1851. It was the first in a series of World\'s Fairs , exhibitions of culture and industry that became popular in the 19th century, and it was a much anticipated event. The Great Exhibition was organized by Henry Cole and Prince Albert
Prince Albert
, husband of the reigning monarch, Queen Victoria
Queen Victoria
. It was attended by famous people of the time, including Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
, Samuel Colt , members of the Orléanist Royal Family and the writers Charlotte Brontë , Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens
, Lewis Carroll
Lewis Carroll
, George Eliot
George Eliot
and Alfred Tennyson . Music for the opening was under the direction of Sir George Thomas Smart and the continuous music from the exhibited organs for the Queen's procession was "under the superintendence of William Sterndale Bennett "
[...More...]

"Great Exhibition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wikisource
WIKISOURCE is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki , operated by the Wikimedia Foundation . Wikisource is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the _Déclaration universelle des Droits de l\'Homme_ ), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name PROJECT SOURCEBERG, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg . The name Wikisource was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later. The project has come under criticism for lack of reliability but it is also cited by organisations such as the National Archives and Records Administration . The project holds works that are either in the public domain or freely licensed ; professionally published works or historical source documents, not vanity products ; and are verifiable. Verification was initially made offline, or by trusting the reliability of other digital libraries
[...More...]

"Wikisource" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Color Theory
In the visual arts , COLOR THEORY or COLOUR THEORY is a body of practical guidance to color mixing and the visual effects of a specific color combination. There are also definitions (or categories) of colors based on the color wheel : primary color , secondary color and tertiary color . Although color theory principles first appeared in the writings of Leone Battista Alberti (c.1435) and the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci
Leonardo da Vinci
(c.1490), a tradition of "colory theory" began in the 18th century, initially within a partisan controversy over Isaac Newton 's theory of color (Opticks, 1704) and the nature of primary colors . From there it developed as an independent artistic tradition with only superficial reference to colorimetry and vision science . CONTENTS * 1 Color
Color
abstractions * 2 Historical background * 3 Traditional color theory * 3.1 Complementary colors * 3.2 Warm vs
[...More...]

"Color Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alhambra
The ALHAMBRA (/ælˈhæmbrə/ ; Spanish: ; Arabic : الْحَمْرَاء‎‎ , _Al-Ḥamrā_, lit. "The Red One"), the complete Arabic form of which was _Qalat Al-Hamra_, is a palace and fortress complex located in Granada
Granada
, Andalusia
Andalusia
, Spain
Spain
. It was originally constructed as a small fortress in AD 889 on the remains of Roman fortifications, and then largely ignored until its ruins were renovated and rebuilt in the mid-13th century by the Moorish emir Mohammed ben Al-Ahmar of the Emirate of Granada
Granada
, who built its current palace and walls. It was converted into a royal palace in 1333 by Yusuf I, Sultan of Granada
Granada
. After the conclusion of the Christian Reconquista
Reconquista
in 1492, the site became the Royal Court of Ferdinand and Isabella (where Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus
received royal endorsement for his expedition), and the palaces were partially altered to Renaissance tastes. In 1526 Charles I its most characteristic feature, however, is the dense wood of English elms brought by the Duke of Wellington in 1812
[...More...]

"Alhambra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chromolithography
CHROMOLITHOGRAPHY is a unique method for making multi-colour prints . This type of colour printing stemmed from the process of lithography , and includes all types of lithography that are printed in colour. When chromolithography is used to reproduce photographs, the term photochrome is frequently used. Lithographers sought to find a way to print on flat surfaces with the use of chemicals instead of raised relief or recessed intaglio techniques. Chromolithography became the most successful of several methods of colour printing developed by the 19th century; other methods were developed by printers such as Jacob Christoph Le Blon , George Baxter and Edmund Evans , and mostly relied on using several woodblocks with the colours. Hand-colouring also remained important; elements of the official British Ordnance Survey maps were coloured by hand by boys until 1875. The initial technique involved the use of multiple lithographic stones, one for each colour, and was still extremely expensive when done for the best quality results. Depending on the number of colours present, a chromolithograph could take even very skilled workers months to produce. However much cheaper prints could be produced by simplifying both the number of colours used, and the refinement of the detail in the image. Cheaper images, like advertisements, relied heavily on an initial black print (not always a lithograph), on which colours were then overprinted
[...More...]

"Chromolithography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

South Kensington Museum
3,432,325 (2015) * Ranked 6th nationally (2015) * Ranked 11th globally (2013) DIRECTOR Tristram Hunt PUBLIC TRANSIT ACCESS South Kensington WEBSITE vam.ac.uk In 2000, an 11-metre high, blown glass chandelier by Dale Chihuly was installed as a focal point in the rotunda at the V&A's main entrance. The VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM (often abbreviated as the V&A), London, is the world's largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert . The V&A is located in the Brompton district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea , in an area that has become known as " Albertopolis " because of its association with Prince Albert, the Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial
and the major cultural institutions with which he was associated. These include the Natural History Museum , the Science Museum and the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport . Like other national British museums, entrance to the museum has been free since 2001 . The V&A covers 12.5 acres (5.1 ha) and 145 galleries. Its collection spans 5,000 years of art, from ancient times to the present day, from the cultures of Europe , North America , Asia and North Africa
[...More...]

"South Kensington Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

V&A
3,432,325 (2015) * Ranked 6th nationally (2015) * Ranked 11th globally (2013) DIRECTOR Tristram Hunt PUBLIC TRANSIT ACCESS South Kensington WEBSITE vam.ac.uk In 2000, an 11-metre high, blown glass chandelier by Dale Chihuly was installed as a focal point in the rotunda at the V&A's main entrance. The VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM (often abbreviated as the V&A), London, is the world's largest museum of decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 4.5 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert . The V&A is located in the Brompton district of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea , in an area that has become known as " Albertopolis " because of its association with Prince Albert, the Albert Memorial
Albert Memorial
and the major cultural institutions with which he was associated. These include the Natural History Museum , the Science Museum and the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
. The museum is a non-departmental public body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport . Like other national British museums, entrance to the museum has been free since 2001 . The V&A covers 12.5 acres (5.1 ha) and 145 galleries. Its collection spans 5,000 years of art, from ancient times to the present day, from the cultures of Europe , North America , Asia and North Africa
[...More...]

"V&A" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry Cole
SIR HENRY COLE (15 July 1808 – 18 April 1882) was a British civil servant and inventor who facilitated many innovations in commerce and education in 19th century in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland . Cole is credited with devising the concept of sending greetings cards at Christmas time, introducing the world's first commercial Christmas card in 1843. CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Felix Summerly pseudonym * 3 Cole and the exhibitions * 4 Museums * 5 Honours and legacy * 6 References * 7 Further reading * 8 External links BIOGRAPHY The world's first commercially produced Christmas card , made by Henry Cole
Henry Cole
1843. Henry Cole
Henry Cole
was born in Bath the son of Captain Henry Robert Cole, then of the 1st Dragoon Guards , and his wife Lætitia Dormer. He was sent in 1817 to Christ\'s Hospital , and upon leaving school in 1823 became clerk to Francis Palgrave , and then a sub-commissioner under the Record Commission . Cole was employed in transcribing records, but found time to study water-colour painting under David Cox , and exhibited sketches at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
. He lived with his father in a house belonging to the novelist Thomas Love Peacock , who retained two rooms in it, and became a friend of young Cole
[...More...]

"Henry Cole" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

South Kensington
SOUTH KENSINGTON is an affluent district of West London
London
in the Royal Borough of Kensington
Kensington
and Chelsea and partly the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
. It is a built-up area 2.4 miles (3.9 km) west- south-west of Charing Cross . CONTENTS * 1 Geography * 2 History * 3 Notable residents * 4 Nearby places * 5 References * 6 External links GEOGRAPHYIt is hard to define boundaries for South Kensington, but a common definition is the commercial area around the South Kensington
Kensington
tube station and the adjacent garden squares and streets (such as Thurloe Square, opposite the Victoria and Albert Museum ). The smaller neighbourhood around Gloucester Road tube station can also be considered a part, and Albertopolis
Albertopolis
around Exhibition Road
Exhibition Road
, which includes the Natural History Museum , the Science Museum , the Victoria and Albert Museum and Baden-Powell House . Other institutions such as the Royal Albert Hall
Royal Albert Hall
, Imperial College
Imperial College
London
London
, the Royal Geographical Society , the Royal College of Art
Royal College of Art
, the Royal College of Music are within the City of Westminster, but considered to be in South Kensington
[...More...]

"South Kensington" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Royal College Of Art
The ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART or RCA is a public research university in London , in the United Kingdom. It offers postgraduate degrees in art and design to students from over 60 countries; it is the only entirely postgraduate art and design university in the world. :118 In the 2017 QS World University Rankings by Subject, the RCA was placed first in the Art and Design subject area. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Campuses * 3 Courses * 4 Rankings * 5 Alumni * 6 Awards and prizes * 7 References * 8 Further reading HISTORYThe RCA was founded in Somerset House in 1837 as the GOVERNMENT SCHOOL OF DESIGN or METROPOLITAN SCHOOL OF DESIGN. Richard Burchett became head of the school in 1852. In 1853 it was expanded and moved to Marlborough House , and then, in 1853 or 1857, to South Kensington , on the same site as the South Kensington Museum . It was renamed the NORMAL TRAINING SCHOOL OF ART in 1857 and the NATIONAL ART TRAINING SCHOOL in 1863. During the later 19th century it was primarily a teacher training college ; pupils during this period included George Clausen , Christopher Dresser , Luke Fildes , Kate Greenaway and Gertrude Jekyll . In 1896 or 1897 the school received the name ROYAL COLLEGE OF ART, and the emphasis of teaching there shifted to the practice of art and design
[...More...]

"Royal College Of Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Marlborough House
Coordinates : 51°30′18″N 0°8′9″W / 51.50500°N 0.13583°W / 51.50500; -0.13583 Marlborough House - south side MARLBOROUGH HOUSE is a Grade I listed mansion in St James\'s , City of Westminster north of The Mall and east of St James\'s Palace and is the headquarters of the Commonwealth of Nations and the seat of the Commonwealth Secretariat . It was built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough , the favourite and confidante of Queen Anne . For over a century it served as the London residence of the Dukes of Marlborough . CONTENTS * 1 Construction * 2 Royal residence * 3 Commonwealth Secretariat * 4 Features * 5 Public opening times * 6 Transport * 7 References * 8 Bibliography * 9 External links CONSTRUCTION In its original form Marlborough House had just two storeys. This illustration of c.1750 shows the garden front. The Duchess wanted her new house to be "strong, plain and convenient and good". The architect Christopher Wren and his son of the same name designed a brick building with rusticated stone quoins (cornerstones) that was completed in 1711. The house was taken up by the Crown in 1817
[...More...]

"Marlborough House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thames Street, London
THAMES STREET, divided into Lower and Upper Thames Street, is a road in the City of London
City of London
, the historic and financial centre of London
London
. It forms part of the busy A3211 route (prior to being rebuilt as a major thoroughfare in the late 1960s, it was the B132) from Tower Hill to Westminster
Westminster
. The London
London
Bridge underpass marks the divide between Upper and Lower Thames Street, with Lower to the east and Upper to the west. HISTORY Looking east down Thames Street, at the London
London
Bridge underpass, in c. 1965 (left) and in 2013 (right). The street has clearly become a major thoroughfare in today's City of London. Thames Street is mentioned in the diary of Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
. The first mention of the road, however, is from 1013 when the Custom-house was founded on the street. During the reign of King Henry VIII , the street contained the London