HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Owen Jones (architect)
Owen Jones (15 February 1809 – 19 April 1874) was an English-born Welsh architect. A versatile architect and designer, he was also one of the most influential design theorists of the nineteenth century.[1] He helped pioneer modern colour theory,[2] and his theories on flat patterning and ornament still resonate with contemporary designers today. He rose to prominence with his studies of Islamic decoration at the Alhambra, and the associated publication of his drawings, which pioneered new standards in chromolithography. Jones was a pivotal figure in the formation of the South Kensington Museum
South Kensington Museum
(later to become the V&A) through his close association with Henry Cole, the museum's first director, and another key figure in 19th century design reform
[...More...]

"Owen Jones (architect)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Academy Schools
The Royal Academy of Arts
Royal Academy of Arts
(RA) is an art institution based in Burlington House
Burlington House
on Piccadilly
Piccadilly
in London
[...More...]

"Royal Academy Schools" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Piccadilly
Piccadilly
Piccadilly
(/ˌpɪkəˈdɪli/) is a road in the City of Westminster, London to the south of Mayfair, between Hyde Park Corner
Hyde Park Corner
in the west and Piccadilly Circus
Piccadilly Circus
in the east. It is part of the A4 road that connects central London to Hammersmith, Earl's Court, Heathrow Airport and the M4 motorway
M4 motorway
westward. St James's
St James's
is to the south of the eastern section, while the western section is built up only on the northern side. Piccadilly
Piccadilly
is just under 1 mile (1.6 km) in length, and is one of the widest and straightest streets in central London. The street has been a main thoroughfare since at least medieval times, and in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
was known as "the road to Reading" or "the way from Colnbrook"
[...More...]

"Piccadilly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Terracotta
Terracotta, terra cotta or terra-cotta (pronounced [ˌtɛrraˈkɔtta]; Italian: "baked earth",[2] from the Latin terra cocta),[3] a type of earthenware, is a clay-based unglazed or glazed ceramic,[4] where the fired body is porous. Terracotta
Terracotta
is the term normally used for sculpture made in earthenware, and also for various utilitarian uses including vessels (notably flower pots), water and waste water pipes, roofing tiles, bricks, and surface embellishment in building construction.[5] The term is also used to refer to the natural, brownish orange color, of most terracotta, which varies considerably. This article covers the senses of terracotta as a medium in sculpture, as in the Terracotta Army
Terracotta Army
and Greek terracotta figurines, and architectural decoration. Asian and European sculpture in porcelain is not covered
[...More...]

"Terracotta" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

De La Rue
De La Rue
De La Rue
plc (/ˈdɛlə ruː/ or US: /ˌdɛlə ˈruː/) is a British banknote manufacturing, security printing of passports and tax stamps, brand authentication and paper-making company with headquarters in Basingstoke, Hampshire, England. It also has a factory on the Team Valley Trading Estate, Gateshead, and other facilities at Loughton, Essex, and Bathford, Somerset.[2] There are overseas offices in Kenya, Sri Lanka and Malta
[...More...]

"De La Rue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Joseph Paxton
Sir Joseph Paxton
Joseph Paxton
(3 August 1803 – 8 June 1865) was an English gardener, architect and Member of Parliament, best known for designing the Crystal Palace, and for cultivating the Cavendish banana, the most consumed banana in the Western world.Contents1 Early life 2 Chatsworth2.1 Greenhouses3 Crystal Palace 4 Publishing 5 Political career 6 Later life 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Paxton was born in 1803, the seventh son of a farming family, in Milton Bryan, Bedfordshire. Some references, incorrectly, list his birth year as 1801. This is, as he admitted in later life, a result of misinformation he provided in his teens, which enabled him to enrol at Chiswick Gardens. He became a garden boy at the age of fifteen for Sir Gregory Osborne Page-Turner at Battlesden
Battlesden
Park, near Woburn
[...More...]

"Joseph Paxton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cast Iron
Cast iron
Cast iron
is a group of iron-carbon alloys with a carbon content greater than 2%.[1] Its usefulness derives from its relatively low melting temperature. The alloy constituents affect its colour when fractured: white cast iron has carbide impurities which allow cracks to pass straight through, grey cast iron has graphite flakes which deflect a passing crack and initiate countless new cracks as the material breaks, and ductile cast iron has spherical graphite "nodules" which stop the crack from further progressing. Carbon
Carbon
(C) ranging from 1.8–4 wt%, and silicon (Si) 1–3 wt% are the main alloying elements of cast iron. Iron alloys with lower carbon content (~0.8%) are known as steel. While this technically makes the Fe–C–Si system ternary, the principle of cast iron solidification can be understood from the simpler binary iron–carbon phase diagram
[...More...]

"Cast Iron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

J. M. W. Turner
Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (23 April 1775 – 19 December 1851), known as J. M. W. Turner
J. M. W. Turner
and contemporarily as William Turner,[a] was an English Romantic painter, printmaker and watercolourist, known for his expressive colourisation, imaginative landscapes and turbulent, often violent marine paintings. Turner was born in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden, London, to a modest lower middle-class family. He lived in London
London
all his life, retaining his Cockney accent
Cockney accent
and assiduously avoiding the trappings of success and fame. A child prodigy, Turner studied at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
of Arts from 1789, enrolling when he was 14, and exhibited his first work there at 21. During this period, he also served as an architectural draftsman
[...More...]

"J. M. W. Turner" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Matthew Digby Wyatt
Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt (28 July 1820 – 21 May 1877) was a British architect and art historian who became Secretary of the Great Exhibition, Surveyor of the East India Company and the first Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Cambridge.[1] From 1855 until 1859 he was honorary secretary of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and in 1866 received the Royal Gold Medal.[2]Contents1 Life 2 Selected publications 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Born in Rowde, Wiltshire, Wyatt trained as an architect in the office of his elder brother, Thomas Henry Wyatt. He assisted Isambard Kingdom Brunel on the terminus of the Great Western Railway
Great Western Railway
at London Paddington (1854) and later designed a considerable expansion to the Bristol Temple Meads station (1871–8)
[...More...]

"Matthew Digby Wyatt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Richard Burchett
Richard Burchett
Richard Burchett
(1815–1875) was a British artist and educator on the fringes of the Pre-Raphaelite
Pre-Raphaelite
movement, who was for over twenty years the Headmaster of what later became the Royal College of Art. He was later described as "a prominent figure in the art-schools, a well instructed painter, and a teacher exceptionally equipped with all the learning of his craft" by his ex-pupil, the poet Austin Dobson. Burchett's pupils included the extremely varied talents of Kate Greenaway, Christopher Dresser, Elizabeth Thompson
Elizabeth Thompson
(Lady Butler), Sir George Clausen, Sir Luke Fildes, Gertrude Jekyll, Hubert von Herkomer, William Harbutt and Helen Allingham
[...More...]

"Richard Burchett" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Christopher Dresser
Christopher Dresser
Christopher Dresser
(4 July 1834 in Glasgow
Glasgow
– 24 November 1904 in Mulhouse) was a designer and design theorist, now widely known as one of the first and most important, independent designers. He was a pivotal figure in the Aesthetic Movement
Aesthetic Movement
and a major contributor to the allied Anglo-Japanese or Modern English style, both of which originated in England and had long-lasting international influence.Contents1 Biography 2 Partial bibliography 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit]Teapot of 1879Dresser was born in Glasgow, Scotland, of a Yorkshire family. At age 13, he began attending the Government School of Design, Somerset House, London.[citation needed] He received training in design and took botany as his specialization
[...More...]

"Christopher Dresser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mintons Ltd
Mintons
Mintons
was a major ceramics manufacturing company, originated with Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
(1765–1836) the founder of " Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
and Sons", who established his pottery factory in Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England, in 1793, producing earthenware. He formed a partnership, Minton & Poulson, c.1796, with Joseph Poulson who made bone china from c.1798 in his new near-by china pottery. When Poulson died in 1808, Minton carried on alone, using Poulson's pottery for china until 1816. He built a new china pottery in 1824
[...More...]

"Mintons Ltd" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Regent Street
Regent Street
Regent Street
is a major shopping street in the West End of London. It is named after George, the Prince Regent (later George IV) and was built under the direction of the architect John Nash. The street runs from Waterloo Place in St James's
St James's
at the southern end, through Piccadilly Circus
Piccadilly Circus
and Oxford Circus, to All Souls Church. From there Langham Place and Portland Place
Portland Place
continue the route to Regent's Park. The street was completed in 1825 and was an early example of town planning in England, replacing a number of earlier roads including Swallow Street. Nash's street layout has survived, although all the original buildings except All Souls Church have been replaced following reconstruction in the late 19th century.[1] The street is known for its flagship retail stores, including Liberty, Hamleys, Jaeger and the Apple Store
[...More...]

"Regent Street" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Longman & Co
Longman
Longman
is a publishing company founded in London, England, in 1724 and is owned by Pearson PLC. Since 1968, Longman
Longman
has been used primarily as an imprint by Pearson's Schools business
[...More...]

"Longman & Co" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Islamic Art
Islamic
Islamic
art encompasses the visual arts produced from the 7th century onward by people who lived within the territory that was inhabited by or ruled by culturally Islamic
Islamic
populations.[1] It is thus a very difficult art to define because it covers many lands and various peoples over some 1,400 years; it is not art specifically of a religion, or of a time, or of a place, or of a single medium like painting.[2] The huge field of Islamic
Islamic
architecture is the subject of a separate article, leaving fields as varied as calligraphy, painting, glass, pottery, and textile arts such as carpets and embroidery. Islamic
Islamic
art is not at all restricted to religious art, but includes all the art of the rich and varied cultures of Islamic
Islamic
societies as well
[...More...]

"Islamic Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Alfred Morrison
Alfred Morrison (1821–1897) was an English collector, known for his interest in works of art, autographs and manuscripts.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 NotesLife[edit] The second son of James Morrison (1790–1857) the businessman, he had from his father a large fortune. He went to the University of Edinburgh, and spent a student year at Trinity College, Cambridge, travelled, and later unsuccessfully stood for parliament.[1][2] Morrison was High Sheriff of Wiltshire
High Sheriff of Wiltshire
in 1857. He died at Fonthill Gifford, Wiltshire, on 22 December 1897, at the age of 76.[3] Works[edit] Morrison's houses at Fonthill and on Carlton House Terrace, London, contained Persian carpets, Chinese porcelain, Greek gems and gold work, and miniatures
[...More...]

"Alfred Morrison" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.