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Ovary
The ovary is an organ found in the female reproductive system that produces an ovum. When released, this travels down the fallopian tube into the uterus, where it may become fertilized by a sperm. There is an ovary (from Latin ovarium, meaning 'egg, nut') found on the left and right sides of the body. The ovaries also secrete hormones that play a role in the menstrual cycle and fertility. The ovary progresses through many stages beginning in the prenatal period through menopause
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Sperm
Sperm
Sperm
is the male reproductive cell and is derived from the Greek word (σπέρμα) sperma (meaning "seed"). In the types of sexual reproduction known as anisogamy and its subtype oogamy, there is a marked difference in the size of the gametes with the smaller one being termed the "male" or sperm cell. A uniflagellar sperm cell that is motile is referred to as a spermatozoon, whereas a non-motile sperm cell is referred to as a spermatium. Sperm
Sperm
cells cannot divide and have a limited life span, but after fusion with egg cells during fertilization, a new organism begins developing, starting as a totipotent zygote. The human sperm cell is haploid, so that its 23 chromosomes can join the 23 chromosomes of the female egg to form a diploid cell
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Medical Subject Headings
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a comprehensive controlled vocabulary for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences; it serves as a thesaurus that facilitates searching. Created and updated by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), it is used by the MEDLINE/ PubMed
PubMed
article database and by NLM's catalog of book holdings. MeSH is also used by ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov
registry to classify which diseases are studied by trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. MeSH was introduced in 1960, with the NLM's own index catalogue and the subject headings of the Quarterly Cumulative Index Medicus (1940 edition) as precursors. The yearly printed version of MeSH was discontinued in 2007 and MeSH is now available online only.[2] It can be browsed and downloaded free of charge through PubMed
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Foundational Model Of Anatomy
The Foundational Model of Anatomy
Anatomy
Ontology (FMA) is a reference ontology for the domain of anatomy
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Lymph
Lymph
Lymph
is the fluid that circulates throughout the lymphatic system. The lymph is formed when the interstitial fluid (the fluid which lies in the interstices of all body tissues)[1] is collected through lymph capillaries. It is then transported through larger lymphatic vessels to lymph nodes, where it is cleaned by lymphocytes, before emptying ultimately into the right or the left subclavian vein, where it mixes back with the blood. Since the lymph is derived from the interstitial fluid, its composition continually changes as the blood and the surrounding cells continually exchange substances with the interstitial fluid. It is generally similar to blood plasma, which is the fluid component of blood. Lymph
Lymph
returns proteins and excess interstitial fluid to the bloodstream. Lymph
Lymph
may pick up bacteria and bring them to lymph nodes, where they are destroyed
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Latin
Latin
has contributed many words to the English language. In particular, Latin
Latin
(and Ancient Greek) roots are used in English descriptions of theology, the sciences, medicine, and law. By the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
(75 BC), Old Latin
Old Latin
had been standardised into Classical Latin
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External Iliac Artery
The external iliac arteries are two major arteries which bifurcate off the common iliac arteries anterior to the sacroiliac joint of the pelvis. They proceed anterior and inferior along the medial border of the psoas major muscles. They exit the pelvic girdle posterior and inferior to the inguinal ligament about one third laterally from the insertion point of the inguinal ligament on the pubic tubercle at which point they are referred to as the femoral arteries.[1] The external iliac artery is usually the artery used to attach the renal artery to the recipient of a kidney transplant.Contents1 Sources 2 Branches 3 Additional images 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksSources[edit]Front of abdomen, showing common iliac artery, the source of the external iliac arteryThe external iliac artery arises from the bifurcation of the common iliac artery
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Internal Iliac Artery
The internal iliac artery (formerly known as the hypogastric artery) is the main artery of the pelvis.Contents1 Structure1.1 Course 1.2 Branches 1.3 Structure in fetus 1.4 Variation1.4.1 Common branching variations2 Collateral circulation 3 Additional images 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksStructure[edit] The internal iliac artery supplies the walls and viscera of the pelvis, the buttock, the reproductive organs, and the medial compartment of the thigh
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Synonym
A synonym is a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language. Words that are synonyms are said to be synonymous, and the state of being a synonym is called synonymy. For example, the words begin, start, commence, and initiate are all synonyms of one another. Words are typically synonymous in one particular sense: for example, long and extended in the context long time or extended time are synonymous, but long cannot be used in the phrase extended family. Synonyms with the exact same meaning share a seme or denotational sememe, whereas those with inexactly similar meanings share a broader denotational or connotational sememe and thus overlap within a semantic field
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Solanum
Bassovia Leptostemonum Lyciosolanum Solanum (but see text)SynonymsAndrocera Nutt. Aquartia Jacq. Artorhiza Raf. Bassovia Aubl. Battata Hill Bosleria A.Nelson Ceranthera Raf. Cliocarpus Miers Cyphomandra
Cyphomandra
Mart. ex Sendtn. Diamonon Raf. Dulcamara Moench Lycopersicon
Lycopersicon
Mill. Melongena Mill. Normania Lowe Nycterium Vent. Ovaria Fabr. Parmentiera
Parmentiera
Raf. (non DC.: preoccupied) Petagnia Raf. Pheliandra Werderm. Pseudocapsicum Medik. Scubulus Raf. Solanastrum Fabr. Solanocharis Bitter Solanopsis Bitter Triguera Cav. Solanum
Solanum
is a large and diverse genus of flowering plants, which include two food crops of high economic importance, the potato and the tomato
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Section (botany)
In botany, a section (Latin: sectio) is a taxonomic rank below the genus, but above the species.[1] The subgenus, if present, is higher than the section, and the rank of series, if present, is below the section. Sections may in turn be divided into subsections.[2] Sections are typically used to help organise very large genera, which may have hundreds of species.[1] A botanist wanting to distinguish groups of species may prefer to create a taxon at the rank of section or series to avoid making new combinations, i.e. many new binomial names for the species involved.[1] Examples: Lilium
Lilium
section Martagon Rchb. are the Turks' cap lilies Plagiochila
Plagiochila
aerea Taylor is the type species of Plagiochila
Plagiochila
sect. BursataeReferences[edit]^ a b c Tod F. Stuessy (2009). "The Genus". Plant Taxonomy: the Systematic Evaluation of Comparative Data (2nd ed.). Columbia University Press
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Simple Cuboidal Epithelium
Simple cuboidal epithelium
Simple cuboidal epithelium
is a type of epithelium that consists of a single layer of cuboidal (cube-like) cells. These cuboidal cells have large, spherical and central nuclei. Simple cuboidal epithelia are found on the surface of ovaries, the lining of nephrons, the walls of the renal tubules, and parts of the eye and thyroid. On these surfaces, the cells perform secretion and absorption.Contents1 Location 2 Function 3 References 4 External linksLocation[edit] Simple cuboidal cells are also found in kidney tubules, glandular ducts, ovaries, and the thyroid gland. Simple cuboidal cells are found in single rows with their spherical nuclei in the center of the cells and are directly attached to the basal surface
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Mesothelium
The mesothelium is a membrane composed of simple squamous epithelium[1] that forms the lining of several body cavities: the pleura (thoracic cavity), peritoneum (abdominal cavity including the mesentery), mediastinum and pericardium (heart sac). Mesothelial tissue also surrounds the male internal reproductive organs (the tunica vaginalis testis) and covers the internal reproductive organs of women (the tunica serosa uteri). Mesothelium
Mesothelium
that covers the internal organs is called visceral mesothelium, while the layer that covers the body walls is called the parietal mesothelium. Mesothelium is the epithelial component of serosa.Contents1 Origin 2 Structure 3 Function 4 Role in disease 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigin[edit] Mesothelium
Mesothelium
derives from the embryonic mesoderm cell layer, that lines the coelom (body cavity) in the embryo
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Peritoneal Cavity
The peritoneal cavity is a potential space between the parietal peritoneum (the peritoneum that surrounds the abdominal wall) and visceral peritoneum (the peritoneum that surrounds the internal organs).[1][2] Both the parietal and visceral peritonea are not different but the same peritoneum given two names depending on their function/location. It is one of the spaces derived from the coelomic cavity of the embryo, the others being the pleural cavities around the lungs and the pericardial cavity around the heart. It is the largest serosal sac, and the largest fluid-filled cavity,[3] in the body and secretes approximately 50 mL of fluid per day
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Cumulus Oophorus
The cumulus oophorus ( Latin
Latin
cumulus=heap, Greek oo=egg + phor=carrier; Latinized ending "-us"), also called discus proligerus, is a cluster of cells (called cumulus cells) that surround the oocyte both in the ovarian follicle and after ovulation. In the antral follicle, it may be regarded as an extension of the membrana granulosa
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