HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Outline Of Chocolate
The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to chocolate:Contents1 What is chocolate?1.1 What type of thing is chocolate? 1.2 What is chocolate made of?1.2.1 Necessary ingredients1.2.1.1 Substances found in cacao 1.2.1.2 Source of the cocao bean1.2.2 Optional ingredients 1.2.3 Ingredients of white chocolate2 Types 3 Production methods 4 Producers and trade organizations 5 Brands 6 Edibles6.1 Drinks7 History 8 Effects on health 9 Other articles 10 References 11 External linksWhat is chocolate?[edit] Chocolate
Chocolate
– raw or processed
[...More...]

"Outline Of Chocolate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Outline (list)
An outline, also called a hierarchical outline, is a list arranged to show hierarchical relationships and is a type of tree structure. An outline is used[1] to present the main points (in sentences) or topics (terms) of a given subject. Each item in an outline may be divided into additional sub-items. If an organizational level in an outline is to be sub-divided, it shall have at least two subcategories, as advised by major style manuals in current use.[2] An outline may be used as a drafting tool of a document, or as a summary of the content of a document or of the knowledge in an entire field. It is not to be confused with the general context of the term "outline", which a summary or overview of a subject, presented verbally or written in prose[3] (for example, The Outline of History
The Outline of History
is not an outline of the type presented below)
[...More...]

"Outline (list)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Côte D'Ivoire
Coordinates: 8°N 5°W / 8°N 5°W / 8; -5 Republic
Republic
of Côte d'Ivoire République de Côte d'Ivoire (French)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Union – Discipline – Travail" (French) "Unity – Discipline – Work"Anthem: L'Abidjanaise Song of AbidjanLocation of  Ivory Coast  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital Yamoussoukro
[...More...]

"Côte D'Ivoire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

First-pass Metabolism
The first pass effect (also known as first-pass metabolism or presystemic metabolism) is a phenomenon of drug metabolism whereby the concentration of a drug is greatly reduced before it reaches the systemic circulation.[1][2] It is the fraction of drug lost during the process of absorption which is generally related to the liver and gut wall. Notable drugs that experience a significant first-pass effect are imipramine, morphine, propranolol, buprenorphine, diazepam, midazolam, pethidine, marijuana, cimetidine, lidocaine, and nitroglycerin
[...More...]

"First-pass Metabolism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phenylacetic Acid
Phenylacetic acid
Phenylacetic acid
(PAA) (conjugate base phenylacetate), also known by various synonyms, is an organic compound containing a phenyl functional group and a carboxylic acid functional group. It is a white solid with a disagreeable odor. Endogeneously, it is a catabolite of phenylalanine. As a commercial chemical, because it can be used in the illicit production of phenylacetone (used in the manufacture of substituted amphetamines), it is subject to controls in countries including the United States
United States
and China.[2]Contents1 Names 2 Occurrence 3 Preparation 4 Applications4.1 Drug uses5 See also 6 ReferencesNames[edit] Synonyms include α-toluic acid, benzeneacetic acid, alpha tolylic acid, 2-phenylacetic acid, and β-phenylacetic acid. Occurrence[edit] Phenylacetic acid
Phenylacetic acid
has been found to be an active auxin (a type of plant hormone),[3] found predominantly in fruits
[...More...]

"Phenylacetic Acid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monoamine Oxidase
L- Monoamine
Monoamine
oxidases (MAO) (EC 1.4.3.4) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of monoamines.[1][2] They are found bound to the outer membrane of mitochondria in most cell types in the body
[...More...]

"Monoamine Oxidase" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Concentration
In chemistry, concentration is the abundance of a constituent divided by the total volume of a mixture. Several types of mathematical description can be distinguished: mass concentration, molar concentration, number concentration, and volume concentration.[1] The term concentration can be applied to any kind of chemical mixture, but most frequently it refers to solutes and solvents in solutions
[...More...]

"Concentration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brain
The brain is an organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals. The brain is located in the head, usually close to the sensory organs for senses such as vision. The brain is the most complex organ in a vertebrate's body. In a human, the cerebral cortex contains approximately 15–33 billion neurons,[1] each connected by synapses to several thousand other neurons. These neurons communicate with one another by means of long protoplasmic fibers called axons, which carry trains of signal pulses called action potentials to distant parts of the brain or body targeting specific recipient cells. Physiologically, the function of the brain is to exert centralized control over the other organs of the body. The brain acts on the rest of the body both by generating patterns of muscle activity and by driving the secretion of chemicals called hormones. This centralized control allows rapid and coordinated responses to changes in the environment
[...More...]

"Brain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Theophylline
Theophylline, also known as 1,3-dimethylxanthine, is a methylxanthine drug used in therapy for respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma under a variety of brand names. As a member of the xanthine family, it bears structural and pharmacological similarity to theobromine and caffeine, and is readily found in nature, and is present in tea (Camellia sinensis) and cocoa (Theobroma cacao)
[...More...]

"Theophylline" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lecithin
Lecithin
Lecithin
(UK: /ˈlɛsɪθɪn/, US: /ˈlɛsəθɪn/, from the Greek lekithos, "egg yolk") is a generic term to designate any group of yellow-brownish fatty substances occurring in animal and plant tissues, which are amphiphilic – they attract both water and fatty substances (and so are both hydrophilic and lipophilic), and are used for smoothing food textures, dissolving powders (emulsifying), homogenizing liquid mixtures, and repelling sticking materials.[1][2] Lecithins are mixtures of glycerophospholipids including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatid
[...More...]

"Lecithin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caffeine
Caffeine
Caffeine
is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the methylxanthine class.[10] It is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive drug. Unlike many other psychoactive substances, it is legal and unregulated in nearly all parts of the world. There are several known mechanisms of action to explain the effects of caffeine. The most prominent is that it reversibly blocks the action of adenosine on its receptor and consequently prevents the onset of drowsiness induced by adenosine. Caffeine
Caffeine
also stimulates certain portions of the autonomic nervous system. Caffeine
Caffeine
is a bitter, white crystalline purine, a methylxanthine alkaloid, and is chemically related to the adenine and guanine bases of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA)
[...More...]

"Caffeine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vanilla
Vanilla
Vanilla
is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod".[1] Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés
Hernán Cortés
is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.[2] Pollination
Pollination
is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived
[...More...]

"Vanilla" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sugar
Sugar
Sugar
is the generic name for sweet-tasting, soluble carbohydrates, many of which are used in food. There are various types of sugar derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose, and galactose. The "table sugar" or "granulated sugar" most customarily used as food is sucrose, a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. Sugar
Sugar
is used in prepared foods (e.g., cookies and cakes) and is added to some foods and beverages (e.g., coffee and tea). In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into the simple sugars fructose and glucose. Other disaccharides include maltose from malted grain, and lactose from milk. Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides. Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol and sugar alcohols may also have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugars
[...More...]

"Sugar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Milk
Milk
Milk
is a white liquid produced by the mammary glands of mammals. It is the primary source of nutrition for infant mammals (including humans who breastfeed) before they are able to digest other types of food. Early-lactation milk contains colostrum, which carries the mother's antibodies to its young and can reduce the risk of many diseases. It contains many other nutrients[1] including protein and lactose. As an agricultural product, milk is extracted from non-human mammals during or soon after pregnancy
[...More...]

"Milk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caramel
Caramel
Caramel
(/ˈkærəmɛl/ or /ˈkɑːrməl/[1][2]) is a medium- to dark-orange confectionery product made by heating a variety of sugars. It can be used as a flavoring in puddings and desserts, as a filling in bonbons, or as a topping for ice cream and custard. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 170 °C (338 °F). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and re-form into compounds with a characteristic color and flavor. A variety of candies, desserts, and confections are made with caramel: brittles, nougats, pralines, crème brûlée, crème caramel, and caramel apples
[...More...]

"Caramel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peanut
The peanut, also known as the groundnut and the goober[2] and taxonomically classified as Arachis
Arachis
hypogaea, is a legume crop grown mainly for its edible seeds. It is widely grown in the tropics and subtropics, being important to both small and large commercial producers. It is classified as both a grain legume[3] and, because of its high oil content, an oil crop.[4] World annual production of shelled peanuts was 42 million tonnes in 2014. Atypically among crop plants, peanut pods develop underground rather than aboveground
[...More...]

"Peanut" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.