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Oskar Van Deventer
Oskar van Deventer is a Dutch puzzle maker.[1] He prototypes puzzles using 3D Printing.[2][3] Many of his combination puzzles are in mass production by Uwe Mèffert and Witeden. His 17x17x17 "Over the Top Cube" Rubik's cube-style puzzle is the largest of its kind[4] Oskar van Deventer has also designed puzzles for Hanayama. He was a Guinness World Record holder for his 17x17x17 cube from 2012 to 2016[5] (In 2016 this was beaten by a 22x22x22 cube[6]). His work combines mathematics, physics, and design, and he collaborates at academic institutions.[7] In addition to being a puzzle maker, Oskar is a research scientist in the area of media networking and holds a Ph.D. in optics
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3D Printing
3D printing
3D printing
refers to processes in which material is joined or solidified under computer control to create a three-dimensional object,[1] with material being added together (such as liquid molecules or powder grains being fused together). 3D printing
3D printing
is used in both rapid prototyping and additive manufacturing (AM). Objects can be of almost any shape or geometry and typically are produced using digital model data from a 3D model or another electronic data source such as an Additive Manufacturing File
File
(AMF) file (usually in sequential layers). There are many different technologies, like stereolithography (STL) or fused deposit modeling (FDM)
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Alexander's Star
Alexander's Star
Alexander's Star
is a puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube, in the shape of a great dodecahedron.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Permutations 4 See also 5 External linksHistory[edit] Alexander's Star
Alexander's Star
was invented by Adam Alexander, an American mathematician, in 1982. It was patented on 26 March 1985, with US patent number 4,506,891, and sold by the Ideal Toy Company. It came in two varieties: painted surfaces or stickers. Since the design of the puzzle practically forces the stickers to peel with continual use, the painted variety is likely a later edition. Description[edit] The puzzle has 30 moving pieces, which rotate in star-shaped groups of five around its outermost vertices. The purpose of the puzzle is to rearrange the moving pieces so that each star is surrounded by five faces of the same color, and opposite stars are surrounded by the same color
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Octahedron
In geometry, an octahedron (plural: octahedra) is a polyhedron with eight faces, twelve edges, and six vertices. The term is most commonly used to refer to the regular octahedron, a Platonic solid
Platonic solid
composed of eight equilateral triangles, four of which meet at each vertex. A regular octahedron is the dual polyhedron of a cube. It is a rectified tetrahedron. It is a square bipyramid in any of three orthogonal orientations
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Skewb Diamond
The Skewb
Skewb
Diamond is an octahedron-shaped puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube. It has 14 movable pieces which can be rearranged in a total of 138,240 possible combinations. This puzzle is the dual polyhedron of the Skewb.Contents1 Description 2 Number of combinations 3 See also 4 External linksDescription[edit] The Skewb
Skewb
Diamond has 6 octahedral corner pieces and 8 triangular face centers. All pieces can move relative to each other. It is a deep-cut puzzle; its planes of rotation bisect it. It is very closely related to the Skewb, and shares the same piece count and mechanism. However, the triangular "corners" present on the Skewb
Skewb
have no visible orientation on the Skewb
Skewb
Diamond, and the square "centers" gain a visible orientation on the Skewb
Skewb
Diamond
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Dodecahedron
In geometry, a dodecahedron (Greek δωδεκάεδρον, from δώδεκα dōdeka "twelve" + ἕδρα hédra "base", "seat" or "face") is any polyhedron with twelve flat faces. The most familiar dodecahedron is the regular dodecahedron, which is a Platonic solid. There are also three regular star dodecahedra, which are constructed as stellations of the convex form. All of these have icosahedral symmetry, order 120. The pyritohedron is an irregular pentagonal dodecahedron, having the same topology as the regular one but pyritohedral symmetry while the tetartoid has tetrahedral symmetry. The rhombic dodecahedron, seen as a limiting case of the pyritohedron, has octahedral symmetry. The elongated dodecahedron and trapezo-rhombic dodecahedron variations, along with the rhombic dodecahedra, are space-filling
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Megaminx
The Megaminx
Megaminx
(/ˈmɛɡəmɪŋks/ or /ˈmeɪ-/) is a dodecahedron-shaped puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube. It has a total of 50 movable pieces to rearrange, compared to the 20 movable pieces of the Rubik's Cube.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Variations 5 Number of combinations 6 Records6.1 Top 5 solvers by single solve 6.2 Top 5 solvers by average of 5 solves7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The Megaminx, or Magic Dodecahedron, was invented by several people independently and produced by several different manufacturers with slightly different designs. Uwe Mèffert eventually bought the rights to some of the patents and continues to sell it in his puzzle shop under the Megaminx
Megaminx
moniker.[1] It is also known by the name Hungarian Supernova, invented by Dr. Cristoph Bandelow.[2] His version came out first, shortly followed by Meffert's Megaminx
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Pyraminx Crystal
The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal is a dodecahedral puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube and the Megaminx. It is manufactured by Uwe Mèffert and has been sold in his puzzle shop since 2008. The puzzle was originally called the Brilic,[1] and was first made in 2006 by Aleh Hladzilin,[2] a member of the Twisty Puzzles Forum. It is not to be confused with the Pyraminx, which is also invented and sold by Meffert.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Number of combinations 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]White-bodied Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal with a star pattern applied to the faces.The Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Crystal was patented in Europe on July 16, 1987. The patent number is DE8707783U. In late 2007, due to requests by puzzle fans worldwide, Uwe Mèffert began manufacturing the puzzle. The puzzles were first shipped in February 2008
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Skewb Ultimate
The Skewb
Skewb
Ultimate, originally marketed as Pyraminx
Pyraminx
Ball is a twelve-sided puzzle derivation of the Skewb, produced by famous toy-maker Uwe Meffert. Most versions of this puzzle are sold with six different colors of stickers attached, with opposite sides of the puzzle having the same color; however, some early versions of the puzzle have a full set of 12 colors.Contents1 Description 2 Solutions 3 Number of combinations 4 See also 5 External linksDescription[edit] The Skewb
Skewb
Ultimate is made in the shape of a dodecahedron, like the Megaminx, but cut differently. Each face is cut into 4 parts, two equal and two unequal
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Icosahedron
In geometry, an icosahedron (/ˌaɪkɒsəˈhiːdrən, -kə-, -koʊ-/ or /aɪˌkɒsəˈhiːdrən/[1]) is a polyhedron with 20 faces. The name comes from Greek εἴκοσι (eíkosi), meaning 'twenty', and ἕδρα (hédra), meaning 'seat'. The plural can be either "icosahedra" (/-drə/) or "icosahedrons". There are many kinds of icosahedra, with some being more symmetrical than others
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Impossiball
The Impossiball
Impossiball
is a rounded icosahedral puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube. It has a total of 20 movable pieces to rearrange, same as the Rubik's Cube, but all of the Impossiball's pieces are corners, like the Pocket Cube.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Number of combinations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] William O. Gustafson applied for a patent for the Impossiball
Impossiball
design in 1981 and it was issued in 1984.[1] Uwe Mèffert eventually bought the rights to some of the patents and continues to sell it in his puzzle shop under the Impossiball
Impossiball
moniker. Description[edit] The Impossiball
Impossiball
is made in the shape of an icosahedron that has been rounded out to a sphere, and has 20 pieces, all of them corners
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Dogic
The Dogic (/ˈdɒdʒɪk/) is an icosahedron-shaped puzzle like the Rubik's Cube. The 5 triangles meeting at its tips may be rotated, or 5 entire faces (including the triangles) around the tip may be rotated. It has a total of 80 movable pieces to rearrange, compared to the 20 pieces in the Rubik's Cube.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Solutions 4 Number of combinations4.1 12-color Dogic 4.2 10-color Dogic5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]The 10-color DogicThe Dogic was patented by Zoltan and Robert Vecsei in Hungary on 20 October 1993. The patent was granted 28 July 1998 (HU214709)
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Great Dodecahedron
In geometry, the great dodecahedron is a Kepler–Poinsot polyhedron, with Schläfli symbol
Schläfli symbol
5,5/2 and Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
Coxeter–Dynkin diagram
of . It is one of four nonconvex regular polyhedra
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Truncated Icosahedron
In geometry, the truncated icosahedron is an Archimedean solid, one of 13 convex isogonal nonprismatic solids whose faces are two or more types of regular polygons. It has 12 regular pentagonal faces, 20 regular hexagonal faces, 60 vertices and 90 edges. It is the Goldberg polyhedron
Goldberg polyhedron
GPV(1,1) or 5+,3 1,1, containing pentagonal and hexagonal faces. This geometry is associated with footballs (soccer balls) typically patterned with white hexagons and black pentagons. Geodesic domes such as those whose architecture Buckminster Fuller
Buckminster Fuller
pioneered are often based on this structure
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Pyramorphix
The Pyramorphix
Pyramorphix
(/ˌpɪrəˈmɔːrfɪks/, often misspelt Pyramorphinx) is a tetrahedral puzzle similar to the Rubik's Cube. It has a total of 8 movable pieces to rearrange, compared to the 20 of the Rubik's Cube. Though it looks like a simpler version of the Pyraminx, it is an edge-turning puzzle with the mechanism identical to that of the Pocket Cube.Contents1 Description 2 Number of combinations 3 Master Pyramorphix3.1 Solutions 3.2 Number of combinations4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] At first glance, the Pyramorphix
Pyramorphix
appears to be a trivial puzzle. It resembles the Pyraminx, and its appearance would suggest that only the four corners could be rotated. In fact, the puzzle is a specially shaped 2×2×2 cube, if the tetrahedron is considered to be demicube. Four of the cube's corners are reshaped into pyramids and the other four are reshaped into triangles
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Tuttminx
A Tuttminx
Tuttminx
(/ˈtʊtmɪŋks/ or /ˈtʌtmɪŋks/) is a Rubik's Cube-like twisty puzzle, in the shape of a truncated icosahedron. It was invented by Lee Tutt
Lee Tutt
in 2005.[1] It has a total of 150 movable pieces to rearrange, compared to 20 movable pieces of the Rubik’s Cube.Contents1 Description 2 Number of combinations 3 Variations 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] The Tuttminx
Tuttminx
has a total of 32 face centre pieces (12 pentagon and 20 hexagon), 60 corner pieces and 90 edge pieces. The face centres each have a single colour, which identifies the colour of that face in the solved state. The edge pieces have two colours and the corner pieces have three colours
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