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Orson Welles
George Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(/wɛlz/; May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer, and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film. He is remembered for his innovative[1] work in all three: in theatre, most notably Caesar (1937), a Broadway adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; in radio, the legendary[2] 1938 broadcast "The War of the Worlds"; and in film, Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
(1941), consistently ranked as one of the greatest films ever made. In his 20s, Welles directed a number of high-profile stage productions for the Federal Theatre Project, including an adaptation of Macbeth with an entirely African American cast, and the political musical The Cradle Will Rock. In 1937 he and John Houseman
John Houseman
founded the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented a series of productions on Broadway through 1941
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Wells House (North Adams, Massachusetts)
The Wells House is a historic house located at 568 West Main Street in North Adams, Massachusetts. Built about 1840, it is a locally rare surviving example of a Greek Revival farmhouse. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
in 1985.[1]Contents1 Description and history 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription and history[edit] The Wells House is located west of downtown North Adams, at the southwest corner of West Main Street (Massachusetts Route 2) and Notch Road. It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, with a gabled roof, interior brick chimneys, and a clapboarded exterior. Its bays on three sides are articulated by two-story Doric pilasters, which rise to an entablature below the cornice. The gable ends on the sides are fully pedimented
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Broadway Theatre
Broadway theatre,[nb 1] commonly known as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.[1] Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre
Broadway theatre
is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. The Theater District is a popular tourist attraction in New York City. According to The Broadway League, for the 2016–2017 season (which ended May 21, 2017), total attendance was 13,270,343 and Broadway shows had US$1,449,399,149 in grosses, with attendance down 0.4%, grosses up 5.5%, and playing weeks down 4.1%.[2] The great majority of Broadway shows are musicals
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Magic (illusion)
Magic, along with its subgenres of, and sometimes referred to as illusion, stage magic or street magic is a performing art in which audiences are entertained by staged tricks or illusions of seemingly impossible feats using natural means.[1][2] It is to be distinguished from paranormal magic which, it is claimed, are effects created through supernatural means. It is one of the oldest performing arts in the world.Contents1 History1.1 Magic tricks 1.2 Modern stage magic2 Categories of effects 3 Learning magic 4 Types of magic performance 5 Misuse of magic 6 Researching magic 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksHistory[edit] The term "magic" etymologically derives from the Greek word mageia (μαγεία). In ancient times, Greeks and Persians had been at war for centuries, and the Persian priests, called magosh in Persian, came to be known as magoi in Greek
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Baritone
A baritone[1] is a type of classical male singing voice whose vocal range lies between the bass and the tenor voice types. It is the most common male voice.[2][3] Originally from the Greek βαρύτονος (barýtonos), meaning heavy sounding, music for this voice is typically written in the range from the second F below middle C to the F above middle C (i.e. F2–F4) in choral music, and from the second A below middle C to the A above middle C (A2 to A4) in operatic music, but can be extended at either end
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British Film Institute
The British Film
Film
Institute (BFI) is a film and charitable organisation which promotes and preserves filmmaking and television in the United Kingdom. It was established by Royal Charter
Roya

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Chiaroscuro
Chiaroscuro
Chiaroscuro
(English: /kiˌɑːrəˈskjʊəroʊ/; Italian: [ˌkjaroˈskuːro]; Italian for light-dark), in art, is the use of strong contrasts between light and dark, usually bold contrasts affecting a whole composition. It is also a technical term used by artists and art historians for the use of contrasts of light to achieve a sense of volume in modelling three-dimensional objects and figures.[1] Similar effects in cinema and photography also are called chiaroscuro. Further specialized uses of the term include chiaroscuro woodcut for coloured woodcuts printed with different blocks, each using a different coloured ink; and chiaroscuro drawing for drawings on coloured paper in a dark medium with white highlighting. Chiaroscuro is a mainstay of black and white photography. The underlying principle is that solidity of form is best achieved by the light falling against it
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Lighting
Lighting
Lighting
or illumination is the deliberate use of light to achieve a practical or aesthetic effect. Lighting
Lighting
includes the use of both artificial light sources like lamps and light fixtures, as well as natural illumination by capturing daylight. Daylighting
Daylighting
(using windows, skylights, or light shelves) is sometimes used as the main source of light during daytime in buildings. This can save energy in place of using artificial lighting, which represents a major component of energy consumption in buildings. Proper lighting can enhance task performance, improve the appearance of an area, or have positive psychological effects on occupants. Indoor lighting is usually accomplished using light fixtures, and is a key part of interior design
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Major Film Studio
A major film studio is a production and distribution company that releases a substantial number of films annually and consistently commands a significant share of box office revenue in a given market. In the American and international markets, the major film studios, often simply known as the majors, are commonly regarded as the six diversified media conglomerates whose various film production and distribution subsidiaries collectively command approximately 80 to 85% of U.S. box office revenue.[1][2] The term may also be applied more specifically to the primary motion picture business subsidiary of each respective conglomerate. The "Big Six" majors, whose operations are based in or around the Los Angeles neighborhood of Hollywood, are all centered in film studios active during Hollywood's Golden Age of the 1930s and 1940s. In three cases—20th Century Fox, Warner Bros., and Paramount Pictures—the studios were one of the "Big Five" majors during that era as well
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Studio System
The studio system (which was used during a period known as the Golden Age of Hollywood) is a method of film production and distribution dominated by a small number of "major" studios in Hollywood. Although the term is still used today as a reference to the systems and output of the major studios, historically the term refers to the practice of large motion picture studios between the 1920s and 1960s of (a) producing movies primarily on their own filmmaking lots with creative personnel under often long-term contract, and (b) dominating exhibition through vertical integration, i.e., the ownership or effective control of distributors and exhibition, guaranteeing additional sales of films through manipulative booking techniques such as block booking. The studio system was challenged under the anti-trust laws in a 1948 Supreme Court ruling which sought to separate production from the distribution and exhibition and ended such practices, thereby hastening the end of the studio system
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Repertory Theatre
A repertory theatre (also called repertory, rep or stock) can be a Western theatre or opera production in which a resident company presents works from a specified repertoire, usually in alternation or rotation. In the British system, however, it used to be that even quite small towns would support a rep and the resident company would present a different play every week, either a revival from the full range of classics or, if given the chance, a new play, once the rights had been released after a West End or Broadway run. However the companies were not known for trying out untried new work
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St. Joseph, Missouri
St. Joseph (informally St. Joe) is a city in and the county seat of Buchanan County, Missouri, United States.[4] It is the principal city of the St. Joseph Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Buchanan, Andrew, and DeKalb counties in Missouri
Missouri
and Doniphan County, Kansas. As of the 2010 census, St. Joseph had a total population of 76,780, making it the eighth largest city in the state, third largest in Northwest Missouri.[5] St. Joseph, named after the biblical Saint Joseph, is located on the Missouri
Missouri
River. It is perhaps best known as the starting point of the Pony Express
Pony Express
and the death place of Jesse James; Hip Hop star Eminem was born here as well.[6] St
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Wisconsin
Wisconsin
Wisconsin
(/wɪˈskɒnsɪn/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota
Minnesota
to the west, Iowa
Iowa
to the southwest, Illinois
Illinois
to the south, Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior
Lake Superior
to the north. Wisconsin
Wisconsin
is the 23rd largest state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee, which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan
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Kenosha, Wisconsin
Kenosha /kɛˈnoʊˌʃɑː/ is a city in and the county seat of Kenosha County, Wisconsin, United States.[8] Kenosha is on the southwestern shore of Lake Michigan. With an estimated population of 99,889 as of July 1, 2013,[9] it is the fourth-largest city in Wisconsin
Wisconsin
and the fourth-largest city on Lake Michigan
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School Of The Art Institute Of Chicago
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Chicago
(SAIC) is one of America's largest accredited independent schools of art and design. It is located in the Loop in Chicago, Illinois. The school is associated with the museum of the same name, and "The Art Institute of Chicago" or " Chicago
Chicago
Art Institute" often refers to either entity. Providing degrees at the undergraduate and graduate levels, SAIC has been recognized by U.S
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Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Los Angeles
(/lɔːs ˈændʒələs/ (listen);[a] Spanish: Los Ángeles; Spanish for "The Angels"),[16] officially the City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles
and often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in California; the second most populous city in the United States, after New York City; and the third-most populous city in North America, after Mexico City
Mexico City
and New York City. With an estimated population of nearly four million people,[11] Los Angeles is the cultural, financial, and commercial center of Southern California. The city is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood, the entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles
Los Angeles
lies in a basin, adjacent to the Pacific Ocean, with mountains as high as 10,000 feet (3,000 m), and deserts
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