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Orkney
Orkney
Orkney
/ˈɔːrkni/ (Old Norse: Orkneyjar, Pictish: Insi Orc, "islands of the pigs"), also known as the Orkney
Orkney
Islands,[Notes 1] is an archipelago in the Northern Isles
Northern Isles
of Scotland, situated off the north coast of Great Britain. Orkney
Orkney
is 16 kilometres (10 mi) north of the coast of Caithness
Caithness
and comprises approximately 70 islands, of which 20 are inhabited.[2][3][4] The largest island, Mainland, is often referred to as "the Mainland"
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Old Irish
Old Irish (Old Irish: Goídelc; Irish: Sean-Ghaeilge; Scottish Gaelic: Seann Ghàidhlig; Manx: Shenn Yernish; sometimes called Old Gaelic[2][3]) is the name given to the oldest form of the Goidelic languages for which extensive written texts are extant. It was used from c.600 to c.900. The primary contemporary texts are dated c.700–850; by 900 the language had already transitioned into early Middle Irish. Some Old Irish texts date from the 10th century, although these are presumably copies of texts composed at an earlier time period. Old Irish is thus the ancestor of Modern Irish, Manx, and Scottish Gaelic.[2] Old Irish is known for having a particularly complex system of morphology and especially of allomorphy (more or less unpredictable variations in stems and suffixes in differing circumstances) as well as a complex sound system involving grammatically significant consonant mutations to the initial consonant of a word
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Archipelago
An archipelago (/ɑːrkɪˈpɛləɡoʊ/ ( listen) ark-i-PEL-ə-goh), sometimes called an island group or island chain, is a chain, cluster or collection of islands, or sometimes a sea containing a small number of scattered islands. The word archipelago is derived from the Greek ἄρχι- – arkhi- ("chief") and πέλαγος – pélagos ("sea") through the Italian arcipelago. In Italian, possibly following a tradition of antiquity, the Archipelago
Archipelago
(from medieval Greek *ἀρχιπέλαγος and Latin archipelagus) was the proper name for the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
and, later, usage shifted to refer to the Aegean Islands
Aegean Islands
(since the sea is remarkable for its large number of islands).Contents1 Types 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksTypes[edit] Archipelagos may be found isolated in large amounts of water or neighbouring a large land mass
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Willem Blaeu
Willem Janszoon
Willem Janszoon
Blaeu (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈʋɪləm ˈjɑnsoːm ˈblʌu];[1] 1571 – 21 October 1638), also abbreviated to Willem Jansz. Blaeu, was a Dutch cartographer, atlas maker and publisher. He was one of the notable representatives of the Netherlandish/Dutch school of cartography in its golden age (the 16th and 17th centuries).Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy 3 Works published by Willem Blaeu 4 Literature 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Blaeu was born at Uitgeest
Uitgeest
or Alkmaar. As the son of a well-to-do herring salesman, he was destined to succeed his father in the trade, but his interests lay more in mathematics and astronomy
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Insular Scots
Insular is an adjective used to describe:An island Someone who is isolated and parochial Insular may also refer to:Contents1 Sub-national territories or regions 2 Periods of political isolation 3 Other uses 4 See alsoSub-national territories or regions[edit] Insular Chile Insular region of Colombia Insular Ecuador, administratively known as Galápagos Province Insular Region (Equatorial Guinea) Insular Italy Insular Portugal, comprises the Madeira and Azores Autonomous Regions Insular Southeast Asia Insular areas of the United States Insular Cases, a series of U.S. Supreme Court decisions in 1901, about the status of U.S. territories acquired in the Spanish–American War Bureau of Insular Affairs, a unit of the U.S
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World Heritage Site
A World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
is a landmark or area which is selected by the United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as having cultural, historical, scientific or other form of significance, and is legally protected by international treaties. The sites are judged important to the collective interests of humanity. To be selected, a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
must be an already classified landmark, unique in some respect as a geographically and historically identifiable place having special cultural or physical significance (such as an ancient ruin or historical structure, building, city, complex, desert, forest, island, lake, monument, mountain, or wilderness area)
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UNESCO
The United Nations
United Nations
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO;[2] French: Organisation des Nations unies pour l'éducation, la science et la culture) is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) based in Paris
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Margaret Of Denmark, Queen Of Scotland
Margaret
Margaret
is a female first name, derived via French (Marguerite) and Latin (Margarita) from Greek Margarites, derived from the noun margaron meaning 'pearl'.[1] The Greek is derived through contact from the Old Persian
Old Persian
word for pearl *margārīta- (compare Modern Persian morvārīd "pearl"), which was cognate to the Sanskrit मञ्जरी mañjarī meaning "pearl" or "cluster of blossoms".[2][3][4][5] Margaret
Margaret
has been an English name since the 11th century, and remained popular throughout the Middle Ages. It became less popular between the 16th century and 18th century, but became more common again after this period, becoming the second most popular name in the United States
United States
in 1903
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Dowry
A dowry is a transfer of parental property, gifts or money at the marriage of a daughter.[1] Dowry
Dowry
contrasts with the related concepts of bride price and dower. While bride price or bride service is a payment by the groom or his family to the bride's parents, dowry is the wealth transferred from the bride's family to the groom or his family, ostensibly for the bride. Similarly, dower is the property settled on the bride herself, by the groom at the time of marriage, and which remains under her ownership and control.[2] Dowry
Dowry
is an ancient custom, and its existence may well predate records of it. Dowries continue to be expected, and demanded as a condition to accept a marriage proposal, in some parts of the world, mainly in parts of Asia, Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and the Balkans
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Mesolithic
In Old World archaeology, the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
(Greek: μέσος, mesos "middle"; λίθος, lithos "stone") is the period between Paleolithic
Paleolithic
and Neolithic, the three periods together forming the Stone Age. The term "Epipaleolithic" is often used for areas outside northern Europe, but was also the preferred synonym used by French archaeologists until the 1960s. The type of culture associated with the Mesolithic
Mesolithic
varies between areas, but it is associated with a decline in the group hunting of large animals in favour of a broader hunter-gatherer way of life, and the development of more sophisticated and typically smaller lithic tools and weapons than the heavy chipped equivalents typical of the Paleolithic
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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Annexation
Annexation
Annexation
( Latin
Latin
ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the administrative action[1] and concept in international law relating to the forcible transition of one state's territory by a
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Gnaeus Julius Agricola
Gnaeus Julius Agricola
Gnaeus Julius Agricola
(/əˈɡrɪkələ/; 13 June 40 – 23 August 93) was a Gallo-Roman general responsible for much of the Roman conquest of Britain. Written by his son-in-law Tacitus, the De vita et moribus Iulii Agricolae is the primary source for most of what is known about him,[1] along with detailed archaeological evidence from northern Britain.[2] Agricola began his military career in Britain, serving under governor Gaius Suetonius Paulinus. His subsequent career saw him serve in a variety of positions; he was appointed quaestor in Asia province in 64, then Plebeian Tribune
Plebeian Tribune
in 66, and praetor in 68. He supported Vespasian
Vespasian
during the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69), and was given a military command in Britain when the latter became emperor
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Countries Of The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) comprises four countries: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and Wales.[1][2] Within the United Kingdom, a unitary sovereign state, Northern Ireland, Scotland
Scotland
and Wales
Wales
have gained a degree of autonomy through the process of devolution. The UK Parliament and British Government deal with all reserved matters for Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and Scotland
Scotland
and all non-transferred matters for Wales, but not in general matters that have been devolved to the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Assembly, Scottish Parliament and National Assembly for Wales
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Wild Boar
The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine[3] Eurasian wild pig,[4] or simply wild pig,[5] is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform.[4] Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN[1] and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene,[6] and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World.[7] As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length.[2] The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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