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Order (biology)
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
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De Candolle System
The De Candolle system is a system of plant taxonomy by French (Swiss) botanist Augustin Pyramus de Candolle
Augustin Pyramus de Candolle
(1778−1841).Contents1 History 2 Systems2.1 Flore française 2.2 Théorie élémentaire de la botanique 2.3 Prodromus2.3.1 Subclassis I. THALAMIFLORÆ [Part I] 2.3.2 Subclassis II. CALYCIFLORÆ [Parts II - VII] 2.3.3 Subclassis III. COROLLIFLORÆ [Parts VIII - XIII(1)] 2.3.4 Subclassis IV
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Hallucicrania
Hallucicrania
Hallucicrania
is an extinct clade of procolophonomorph parareptiles from the early Cisuralian
Cisuralian
epoch (middle Sakmarian stage) to the latest Triassic
Triassic
period (latest Rhaetian
Rhaetian
stage) of Africa, Antarctica, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America
North America
and South America.[1][2] Phylogeny[edit] Hallucicrania
Hallucicrania
was named Michael S. Y. Lee in 1995, and defined as the node-based taxon formed by Lanthanosuchoidea
Lanthanosuchoidea
and Pareiasauria
Pareiasauria
and all its descendants.[3] The clade Ankyramorpha
Ankyramorpha
named by the paleontologists Michael deBraga and Robert R
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Fishes
Tetrapods Fish
Fish
are the gill-bearing aquatic craniate animals that lack limbs with digits. They form a sister group to the tunicates, together forming the olfactores. Included in this definition are the living hagfish, lampreys, and cartilaginous and bony fish as well as various extinct related groups. Tetrapods emerged within lobe-finned fishes, so cladistically they are fish as well. However, traditionally fish are rendered paraphyletic by excluding the tetrapods (i.e., the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals which all descended from within the same ancestry). Because in this manner the term "fish" is defined negatively as a paraphyletic group, it is not considered a formal taxonomic grouping in systematic biology
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International Code Of Zoological Nomenclature
The International Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN) is a widely accepted convention in zoology that rules the formal scientific naming of organisms treated as animals. It is also informally known as the ICZN Code, for its publisher, the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (which shares the acronym "ICZN"). The rules principally regulate:How names are correctly established in the frame of binominal nomenclature[1] Which name must be used in case of name conflicts How scientific literature must cite namesZoological nomenclature is independent of other systems of nomenclature, for example botanical nomenclature. This implies that animals can have the same generic names as plants. The rules and recommendations have one fundamental aim: to provide the maximum universality and continuity in the naming of all animals, except where taxonomic judgment dictates otherwise
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Prefix
A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word.[1] Adding it to the beginning of one word changes it into another word. For example, when the prefix un- is added to the word happy, it creates the word unhappy
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Boreoeutheria
Boreoeutheria
Boreoeutheria
(synonymous with Boreotheria) (Greek: βόρειο "north" + ευ "good" + θεριό "beast") is a clade (magnorder) of placental mammals that is composed of the sister taxa Laurasiatheria (most hoofed mammals, most pawed carnivores, and several other groups) and Euarchontoglires
Euarchontoglires
(Supraprimates)
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Parareptilia
Parareptilia
Parareptilia
("at the side of reptiles") is a subclass or clade of reptiles which is variously defined as an extinct group of primitive anapsids, or a more cladistically correct alternative to Anapsida. Whether the term is valid depends on the phylogenetic position of turtles, whose relationships to other reptilian groups are still uncertain. History of classification[edit] The name Parareptilia
Parareptilia
was coined by Olson in 1947 to refer to an extinct group of Paleozoic
Paleozoic
reptiles, as opposed to the rest of the reptiles or Eureptilia
Eureptilia
("true reptiles").Life restoration of Nyctiphruretus
Nyctiphruretus
acudensThe name fell into disuse until it was revived by cladistic studies, to refer to those anapsids that were thought to be unrelated to turtles. Gauthier et al
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Simiiformes
The simians (infraorder Simiiformes) are monkeys and apes, cladistically including: the New World monkeys or platyrrhines, and the catarrhine clade consisting of the Old World monkeys and apes (including humans). The simian and tarsier lines of haplorhines diverged about 60 million years ago (during the Cenozoic era). Forty million years ago, simians from Africa colonized South America, giving rise to the New World monkeys
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Catarrhini
Cercopithecoidea
Cercopithecoidea
( Old World
Old World
monkeys) Hominoidea
Hominoidea
(apes) Catarrhini
Catarrhini
is one of the two subdivisions of the simians, the other being the plathyrrhine ( New World
New World
monkeys). The Catarrhini
Catarrhini
contains the Old World
Old World
monkeys and the apes; the latter of which are in turn further divided into the lesser apes or gibbons and the great apes, consisting of the orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and humans. The Catarrhine are all native to Africa
Africa
and Asia
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Suffix
In linguistics, a suffix (sometimes termed postfix) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word. Common examples are case endings, which indicate the grammatical case of nouns or adjectives, and verb endings, which form the conjugation of verbs. Particularly in the study of Semitic languages, suffixes are called afformatives, as they can alter the form of the words. In Indo-European studies, a distinction is made between suffixes and endings (see Proto-Indo-European root). Suffixes can carry grammatical information or lexical information. An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence[1] or a grammatical suffix[2] or ending
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Michael Benton
Michael James "Mike" Benton[5] FRS[3] (born 8 April 1956) is a British palaeontologist, and professor of vertebrate palaeontology in the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Bristol.[6] His published work has mostly concentrated on the evolution of Triassic reptiles but he has also worked on extinction events and faunal changes in the fossil record.[4][7][8]Contents1 Education 2 Research 3 Awards and honours 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksEducation[edit] Benton was educated at the University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
and Newcastle University where he was awarded a PhD in 1981. Research[edit] Benton's research investigates palaeobiology, palaeontology, and macroevolution.[4][9][10] Benton is the author of several palaeontology text books (e.g
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Armen Takhtajan
Armen Leonovich Takhtajan
Takhtajan
or Takhtajian (Armenian: Արմեն Լևոնի Թախտաջյան; Russian: Армен Леонович Тахтаджян; surname also transliterated Takhtadjan, Takhtadzhi︠a︡n
Takhtadzhi︠a︡n
or Takhtadzhian, pronounced TAHK-tuh-jahn) (June 10, 1910 – November 13, 2009), was a Soviet-Armenian botanist, one of the most important figures in 20th century plant evolution and systematics and biogeography. His other interests included morphology of flowering plants, paleobotany, and the flora of the Caucasus. He was born in Shusha
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Augustus Quirinus Rivinus
Augustus Quirinus Rivinus
Augustus Quirinus Rivinus
(9 December 1652 – 20 December 1723), also known as August Bachmann or A. Q. Bachmann, was a German physician and botanist who helped to develop better ways of classifying plants.Contents1 Life and work 2 Principal works 3 Associated eponyms 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingLife and work[edit]"Horminum tingitanum" (Salvia tingitana) from Ordo Plantarum 1690Rivinus was born in Leipzig, Germany, and studied at the University of Leipzig
Leipzig
(1669–1671), continued his studies in the University of Helmstedt (where he received M.D. in 1676). In 1677, he started lecturing in medicine at the University of Leipzig, in 1691 appointed to two chairs, that of physiology and of botany, and made the curator of the University medical garden. In 1701, he became professor of pathology, in 1719, professor of therapeutics and permanent dean of the Faculty of Medicine
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Mineral
A mineral is a naturally occurring chemical compound,[1] usually of crystalline form and not produced by life processes. A mineral has one specific chemical composition, whereas a rock can be an aggregate of different minerals or mineraloids. The study of minerals is called mineralogy. As of March 2018[update], there are more than 5,500 known mineral species;[2] 5,312 of these have been approved by the International Mineralogical Association (IMA).[3] Minerals are distinguished by various chemical and physical properties. Differences in chemical composition and crystal structure distinguish the various species, which were determined by the mineral's geological environment when formed. Changes in the temperature, pressure, or bulk composition of a rock mass cause changes in its minerals
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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