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Opposition (parliamentary)
Parliamentary
Parliamentary
opposition is a form of political opposition to a designated government, particularly in a Westminster-based parliamentary system. This article uses the term government as it is used in Parliamentary
Parliamentary
systems, i.e. meaning the administration or the cabinet rather than the state. The title of "Official Opposition" usually goes to the largest of the parties sitting in opposition with its leader being given the title "Leader of the Opposition". In First Past the Post
First Past the Post
assemblies, where the tendency to gravitate into two major parties or party groupings operates strongly, government and opposition roles can go to the two main groupings serially in alternation. The more proportional a representative system, the greater the likelihood of multiple political parties appearing in the parliamentary debating chamber
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Official Opposition (India)
Official Opposition is a term used in India
India
to designate the political party which has secured the largest number of seats in the Lower House of parliament (Lok Sabha) but is not a part of the ruling party or coalition. A political party is officially accorded the status of an opposition party in Lok Sabha, only if it secures at least 10 percent of the seats.1950-1977: vacant 1977- 1979 : Indian National Congress 1984-1989 : vacant[1] 1989 - 1991: Indian National Congress 1991 - 1998: Bharatiya Janata Party 1998 - 2004: Indian National Congress 2004 - 2009: Bharatiya Janata Party 2009 - 2014: Bharatiya Janata Party 2014 - 2019: vacant, No opposition party secured 10% of the total seats (55/543).The Opposition’s main role is to question the government of the day and hold them accountable to the public.The Opposition is equally responsible in upholding the best interests of the people of the country
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Anti-Administration Party
The Anti-Administration party (1789–1792) was an informal faction led by James Madison
James Madison
and Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
that opposed policies of then Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton
Alexander Hamilton
in the first term (1789–1792) of President George Washington. This was not an organized political party, but an unorganized faction and most had been Anti-Federalists in 1788, meaning they opposed ratification of the Constitution of the United States. However, the situation was fluid, with members moving in and out. Although contemporaries often referred to Hamilton's opponents as "Anti-Federalists", historians[who?] prefer not to use this term because several leaders supported ratification, including Virginia Congressman James Madison
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Minority Leader
In U.S. politics, the minority leader is the floor leader of the second largest caucus in a legislative body.[1] Given the two-party nature of the U.S. system, the minority leader is almost inevitably either a Republican or a Democrat. The position could be considered similar to that of the Leader of the Opposition in Parliamentary systems. In bicameral legislatures, the counterpart to the minority leader in the lower house is the Speaker, and the majority leader is hence only the second-most senior member of the majority caucus. Contrastingly, in upper houses the titular Speaker is frequently a separately elected officer such as a lieutenant governor or vice president. The minority leader is often assisted in his/her role by one or more whips, whose job is to enforce party discipline on votes deemed to be crucial by the party leadership and to ensure that members do not vote against the position of the party leaders
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Opposition Front Bench (Ireland)
The Opposition Front Bench in Ireland
Ireland
are the front (and most visible) benches of the parties outside the Government. Since the 2016 general election, the following parties occupy the front benches on the opposition side:Fianna Fáil Front Bench Sinn Féin Front Bench Labour Party Front Bench Green Party Front BenchSee also[edit]Front bench (Ireland) Technical groupReferences[edit]This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article about government in Ireland
Ireland
is a stub
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Pro-democracy Camp (Hong Kong)
The pro-democracy camp or pan-democracy camp (Chinese: 民主派 or 泛民主派) refers to a political alignment that supports increased democracy, namely the universal suffrage of the Chief Executive and the Legislative Council as given by the Basic Law under the "One Country, Two Systems" framework. The pro-democrats generally embrace liberal values such as rule of law, human rights, civil liberties and social justice, yet their economic positions vary. They are often identified as the "opposition camp" due to its non-cooperative and sometimes confrontational stance toward the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
SAR and Chinese central governments. Opposite to the pro-democracy camp is the pro-Beijing camp, whose members are perceived to be supportive of the central government of China
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Opposition (Croatia)
Recent referendums1991 (independence) 2012 (EU membership) 2013 (constitution)Administrative divisionsCounties (Županija)Foreign relationsMinistry of Foreign and European AffairsDiplomatic missions PassportVisa requirementsOther countries Atlasv t eIn Croatia, the Opposition (Croatian: Opozicija; Oporba) comprises all political parties represented in the Croatian Parliament
Croatian Parliament
that are not part of the Government which is supported by the parliamentary majority. The Leader of the Opposition (Croatian: Vođa opozicije; Šef oporbe) is the unofficial title held by the leader of the largest party with no representatives within the government
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Opposition (Australia)
In Australian parliamentary practice, the Opposition or Official Opposition is usually the official title of the second largest party or coalition of parties in the Australian House of Representatives with its leader being given the title Leader of the Opposition. The Opposition serves the same function as the official opposition in other Commonwealth of Nations
Commonwealth of Nations
monarchies that follow the Westminster conventions and practices. It is seen as the alternative government and the existing administration's main opponent in the Australian Parliament and at a general election. By convention, the Opposition Leader in the federal Parliament comes from the House of Representatives, as does the deputy, although the Government and Opposition may also both have leaders in the Senate
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Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition (United Kingdom)
Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition, or the Official Opposition, in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is led by the Leader of the Opposition. This is usually the political party with the second-largest number of seats in the House of Commons, as the largest party will usually form Her Majesty's Government. Since May 2010, the Official Opposition has been the Labour Party, currently led by Jeremy Corbyn.Contents1 Origins 2 Opposition days 3 Leader of the Opposition 4 Ministers' Questions4.1 Prime Minister's Questions 4.2 Other Ministers' Questions5 Seating 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The phrase His Majesty's Opposition was coined in 1826, before the advent of the modern two-party system, when Parliament consisted more of interests, relationships and factions rather than the highly coherent political parties of today (although the Whigs and Tories were the two main parties)
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Official Opposition (New Zealand)
Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition, or commonly the Official Opposition, in New Zealand
New Zealand
is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the ruling government—it does not provide ministers. This is usually the second-largest party in the House of Representatives, although in certain unusual circumstances it may be the largest party (due to a larger government bloc, as is currently the case) or even a third or fourth party.Contents1 Overview 2 Shadow Cabinet2.1 List of Shadow Cabinets3 ReferencesOverview[edit] The Opposition aims to hold the government accountable and to present itself to the electorate as a credible government in waiting. For example, during Question Time, Opposition spokespersons will ask questions of Ministers with the aim of highlighting a weakness or embarrassing the government
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Official Opposition (Canada)
Provincial and territorial executive councilsPremiersLegislative (Queen-in-Parliament) Federal parliamentSenateSpeaker of the Senate Government Leader in the Senate Opposition Leader in the Senate Senate divisionsHouse of CommonsSpeaker of the house Government Leader in the house Opposition Leader in the house Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition Leader of the Opposition Shadow cabinetProvincial and territorial parliamentsJudicial (Queen-on-the-Bench) Court systemSupreme courtFederal chief justice (Richard Wagner)Provincial and territorial courtsProvincial chief justicesConstitutionBritish North America Acts Peace, order, and good government Charter of Rights and FreedomsElectionsFederal electoral districts Federal electoral system 42nd federal election (2015) Provincial electoral districts Politics of the provincesLocal government Municipal governmentRelated topics
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Opposition Party (Hungary)
The Opposition Party was a Hungarian political party between 1847 and 1849.Contents1 History 2 List of notable members of the Opposition Party 3 Literature 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Revolutionary crowd in front of the Hungarian National Museum
Hungarian National Museum
on 15 March 1848The first 'popular representational' National Assembly in Pest in 1848During the Hungarian Reform Era several opposition circles appeared. Among the first was the National Circle from which later the Pest Circle split. When the two organizations newly merged, they formed the Opposition Circle which can be seen as the pedecessor of the Opposition Party. For the elections of the National Assembly in 1847 it was needed to establish a new political force
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South Africa
[Note 1]11 languagesAfrikaans Northern Sotho English Southern Ndebele Southern Sotho Swazi Tsonga Tswana Venda Xhosa ZuluEthnic groups (2014[3])80.2% Black 8.8% Coloured 8.4% White 2.5% AsianReligion See Religion in South AfricaDemonym South AfricanGovernment Unitary dominant-party parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentCyril Ramaphosa• Deputy PresidentDavid Mabuza• Chairperson of the National Council of ProvincesThandi Modise• Speaker of the National AssemblyBaleka Mbete• Chief JusticeMogoeng MogoengLegislature Parliament• Upper houseNational Council• Lower houseNational AssemblyIndependence from the United Kingdom• Union31 May 1910• Self-governance11 December 1931• Republic31 May 1961•
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Singapore
Singapore
Singapore
(/ˈsɪŋ(ɡ)əpɔːr/ ( listen)), officially the Republic
Republic
of Singapore, is a sovereign city-state and island country in Southeast Asia. It lies one degree (137 kilometres or 85 miles) north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, with Indonesia's Riau Islands
Riau Islands
to the south and Peninsular Malaysia
Peninsular Malaysia
to the north. Singapore's territory consists of one main island along with 62 other islets
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Tokenism
Tokenism is the practice of making only a perfunctory or symbolic effort to be inclusive to members of minority groups, especially by recruiting a small number of people from underrepresented groups in order to give the appearance of racial or sexual equality within a workforce.[1][2][3] The effort of including a token employee to a workforce is usually intended to create the impression of social inclusiveness and diversity (racial, religious, sexual, etc.) in order to deflect accusations of social discrimination.[4]Contents1 History1.1 In television 1.2 In the media 1.3 In the workplace 1.4 In politics2 In fiction 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksHistory[edit] The social concept and the employment practice of tokenism became understood in the popular culture of the United States in the late 1950s.[citation needed]
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Debating Chamber
A debate chamber is a room for people to discuss and debate. Debate chambers are used in governmental and educational bodies, such as a parliament, congress, city council, or a university, either for formal proceedings or for informal discourse, such as a deliberative assembly. When used for legislative purposes, a debate chamber may also be known as a council chamber, legislative chamber, or similar term. Some countries, such as New Zealand, use the term debating chamber as a formal name for the room that houses the national legislature.[1]Contents1 Debating 2 Psychology and geometry 3 History 4 Names 5 Seating configuration5.1 Auditorium 5.2 Council
Council
and court 5.3 Rectangular 5.4 Hybrid 5.5 Fan-shaped 5.6 Circular6 Virtual 7 Notes and references 8 External linksDebating[edit]Debating can happen almost anywhere
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