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Operation Tvigi 94
Operation Tvigi '94 was a military operation during the Croat-Bosniak War by the Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
(HVO). It took place on January 24, 1994. HVO forces claimed the village of Here from the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Rama brigade with this successful operation achieved a great strategic and moral goal: aside from the tactical victory, the HVO captured an important strategic position and broke the offensive of the Bosniak forces. The battle changed the balance of power on the Rama-Uskoplje front, marking a turning point in the war between the HVO and the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The victory by the HVO set the stage for the Washington Agreement.[how?][citation needed] References[edit]This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Operation Deny Flight
Operation Deny Flight
Operation Deny Flight
was a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) operation that began on 12 April 1993 as the enforcement of a United Nations (UN) no-fly zone over Bosnia and Herzegovina. The United Nations and NATO
NATO
later expanded the mission of the operation to include providing close air support for UN troops in Bosnia and carrying out coercive air strikes against targets in Bosnia. Twelve NATO
NATO
members contributed forces to the operation and, by its end on 20 December 1995, NATO
NATO
pilots had flown 100,420 sorties. The operation played an important role in shaping both the Bosnian War and NATO. The operation included the first combat engagement[10] in NATO's history, a 28 February 1994 air battle over Banja Luka, and in April 1994, NATO
NATO
aircraft first bombed ground targets in an operation near Goražde
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Battle Of Žepče
The Battle of Žepče
Žepče
was a battle between Army of B&H and HVO in Žepče, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
on the 24th of June 1993. The 319th Mountain Brigade which was located in the city found itself surrounded while other brigade of Army B&H took over high ground around city. Zepce was defended by HVO 111th xp Zepce brigade and Andrija Tadic battalion. After six days of fighting for Zepce, on 30 June Galib Dervisevic agrees to surrender of 305th and 319th Brigade after which brigades ceases to exist. Captured Bosnian soldiers numbered to around 5000. After the battle, and after HVO 'borrowed' several tanks from Bosnian Serb army. HVO launched offensive which enable them to pocket 5 Bosnian brigades from Maglaj to the south of Usora. References[edit]This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources
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Duša Killings
The Duša
Duša
killings refers to the shelling of the village of Duša, Gornji Vakuf
Gornji Vakuf
by the Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
on 18 January 1993, in which 7 Bosniak civilians were killed. Bosniak homes were burnt down after the HVO took control of the village.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Attack on Duša 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Gornji Vakuf
Gornji Vakuf
is a town to the south of the Lašva Valley, which had a population of about 10,000 Croats and 14,000 Bosniaks
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Štrpci Massacre
The Štrpci massacre
Štrpci massacre
was the massacre of 19 civilians (18 Bosniaks
Bosniaks
and one Croat) on 27 February 1993, taken from a Belgrade-Bar train at Štrpci station near Višegrad, on Bosnian territory. Fifteen Serbs were arrested in December 2014 and charged with war crimes for their participation in the massacre. Background[edit] The Belgrade-Bar railway crosses into Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
for 9 km, between the stations at Zlatibor
Zlatibor
and Priboj, both in Serbia. There is one station, Štrpci, but there are no border crossing facilities and trains do not routinely call at the station. The abducted passengers were taken off the train, robbed and physically abused
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Trusina Killings
The Trusina killings
Trusina killings
occurred on 16 April 1993 in the village of Trusina, located in the municipality of Konjic
Konjic
in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where 22 people, four Croat soldiers and 18 Croat civilians, were killed by the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ARBiH) during the Croat–Bosniak War.Contents1 Background 2 Trials 3 References 4 External linksBackground[edit]TrusinaLocation of Trusina in Bosnia and HerzegovinaOn 16 April 1993, between 8 and 9am, an engagement between the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
(ARBiH) and the forces of the Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
began. After the first few hours of the battle, ARBiH troops broke the Croatian defense, and captured Croat soldiers
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Korićani Cliffs Massacre
The Korićani Cliffs massacre was the mass murder of more than 200 Bosniak and Croat men on 21 August 1992, during the Bosnian War, at the Korićani Cliffs (Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian: Korićanske stijene) on Mount Vlašić in central Bosnia and Herzegovina. The victims, former detainees from the Bosnian Serb-run concentration camp at Trnopolje, were separated out from a larger group of civilians being taken to Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina-controlled territory in central Bosnia.[1] The massacre was carried out by members of the special response team of the Public Security Center (CJB) of Prijedor,[2] a
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Sovići And Doljani Massacres
The Sovići and Doljani massacres were war crimes committed against Bosniaks
Bosniaks
by Croatian Defence Forces
Croatian Defence Forces
(HVO) on 17 April 1993, and afterwards in the villages of Doljani and Sovići. According to the ICTY, Croat/HVO forces attacked the villages of Doljani and Sovići, about 50 kilometers north of Mostar
Mostar
in the morning on 17 April 1993. The attack was part of a larger Croatian Defence Forces offensive aimed at taking Jablanica, the main Bosnian Muslim dominated town in the area. The HVO commanders had calculated that they needed two days to take Jablanica. Sovići's geopolitical location was of strategic significance for the HVO as it was en route to Jablanica
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Mokronoge Massacre
The Mokronoge massacre was the massacre of nine Bosniak civilians, in the Duvno
Duvno
Valley
Valley
village of Mokronoge, in Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was committed on 10 August 1993 by Croatian Defence Forces
Croatian Defence Forces
(HVO) soldiers during the Bosnian War.[1][2] In November 1999, Zagreb District Court found Ivan Baković guilty in absentia and sentenced him to 15 year imprisonment.[3] After Ivan Baković was arrested, he was also tried in the Cantonal Court in Livno
Livno
and found guilty of war crimes committed against the civilian population
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Stupni Do Massacre
The Stupni Do massacre was a massacre committed by Croatian forces on Bosniak civilians during the Croat–Bosniak war in the village of Stupni Do in Vareš
Vareš
municipality. It was committed on 23 October 1993 by Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
(HVO) units called "Apostoli" and "Maturice" led by Ivica Rajić, who pleaded guilty before ICTY
ICTY
for war crimes on October 2005. The Croat
Croat
forces took control of the village and massacred most of the captured people. They raped the women before killing them and looted all houses before setting them on fire
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Križančevo Selo Killings
The Križančevo Selo killings
Križančevo Selo killings
occurred in Križančevo Selo, a hamlet in the Lašva Valley
Lašva Valley
in central Bosnia, where a disputed number, possibly as many as 74,[citation needed] Croat soldiers and civilians were killed during an attack by the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ARBiH) on Croatian Defence Council
Croatian Defence Council
(HVO) positions from 22–23 December 1993.[1] The attack occurred when the region was embroiled in the Croat–Bosniak war, and eight months after the Ahmići massacre
Ahmići massacre
in the nearby village of Ahmići. Križančevo Selo is a hamlet situated near the town of Vitez, near the larger villages of Dubravica and Šantići
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Washington Agreement
The Washington Agreement
Washington Agreement
was a ceasefire agreement between the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
and the unrecognized Croatian Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia, signed in Washington on 18 March 1994 and Vienna.[1] It was signed by Bosnian Prime Minister Haris Silajdžić, Croatian Foreign Minister Mate Granić
Mate Granić
and President of Herzeg-Bosnia Krešimir Zubak. Under the agreement, the combined territory held by the Croat
Croat
and Bosnian government forces was divided into ten autonomous cantons, establishing the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Prijedor Ethnic Cleansing
During the Bosnian War, there was an ethnic cleansing campaign committed by the Bosnian Serb
Bosnian Serb
political and military leadership mostly against Bosniak civilians in the Prijedor
Prijedor
region of Bosnia and Herzegovina
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Zvornik Massacre
The Zvornik massacre refers to acts of mass murder and violence committed against Bosniaks and other non-Serb civilians in Zvornik by Serb paramilitary groups[2][3][4] ("Arkanovci", Territorial Defence units, White Eagles, Yellow Wasps[5]) at the beginning of the Bosnian War in 1992
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Operation Neretva '93
Operation Neretva
Neretva
'93 was an Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Herzegovina
(ARBiH) operation against the Croatian Defence Council (HVO) in September 1993 on a 200 km long front from Gornji Vakuf to south of Mostar, one of its largest of the year, on areas which were included in the Croatian Republic of Herzeg-Bosnia. The ARBiH did not achieve its objective to break through to southern Neretva
Neretva
valley and defeat the HVO in Herzegovina
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Grabovica Massacre
The Grabovica massacre
Grabovica massacre
refers to the murders of at least 13[1][2] ethnic Croat inhabitants of the village of Grabovica near Jablanica by members of the Army of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnia and Herzegovina
(ARBiH) 9th Brigade and other unidentified members of ARBiH on 8 or 9 September 1993. Some sources cite a higher number of victims but these have never been officially corroborated.[3]Contents1 Background 2 Murders 3 Investigation 4 ICTY Trial 5 Verdicts 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References8.1 BooksBackground[edit] Main article: Croat–Bosniak War In order to conduct combat operations in Herzegovina to lift the HVO blockade of Mostar, units of the 9th Brigade, the 10th Brigade and the 2nd Independent Battalion, all subordinated to the ARBiH 1st Corps, were sent from Sarajevo
Sarajevo
to the Jablanica sector during Operation Neretva '93 of the ARBiH
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